Tell me about/ show me your ex-racers

HashRouge

Well-Known Member
Joined
16 February 2009
Messages
9,254
Location
Manchester
Visit site
Now that my Masters degree is drawing to an end I'm starting to think about getting myself a riding horse again (need to get a job first though :p). In an ideal world I'd buy B, a 6 year old showjumper, from my former boss, but unfortunately I can't imagine myself ever having £40,000+ to spend on a horse! So I'm starting to think about what I would like and I've seen some very nice ex-race horses on here, so thought I'd see if those of you who own them would be willing to show me pictures and tell me more about them. The thing that worries me most with ex-racers is not the behavioural side but the possibility of back and foot problems, as it may just be because people often post about problems on here, but it seems like there are far more instances of kissing spines, for example, with ex-racers. So I'd like to hear the good and the bad, as well as where you got them from, i.e. did they come more or less straight from the track or had they been through a specialist rehab yard first, or had they been through several other homes etc?

All comments and insights welcome. Realistically it is likely to be a year or so before I am really able to get a new one, I'm just dreaming/ planning for the future!
 

DD265

Well-Known Member
Joined
12 April 2013
Messages
761
Visit site
I've never had one, but what I would say is that people naturally post more about issues than they do about "good" horses ;)
 

be positive

Well-Known Member
Joined
9 July 2011
Messages
19,396
Visit site
I have two in my yard, the first came here initially to rest after a tendon injury, he was gifted to his joint owners daughter and she brought him back into full work, he did a season pointing then retired to become her riding horse, currently being aimed at low level eventing he has enjoyed doing a few hunter trials and recently won his first ever frilly being placed show jumping, he has a fab temperament and loves being pampered.
Soundness wise he seems fairly tough having recovered from the tendon injury and remained sound, we did find out he had been routinely injected into most joints during his time in the racing yard, no evidence that it was required the vet is known to inject anything if asked, his feet are amazing having been dreadful when he arrived he is now working barefoot and they are strong, deep soles with good heels and my farrier thinks they are "perfect" they self trim so he only has to tidy up once in a while.

The other horse is sound enough, he is not in regular work and seems happy enough to do as much or as little as his owner has time for, his feet are ok, he is shod in front only and it can be rather hit and miss when he gets them done so to say they could be better would be the best way to describe them although they are certainly not bad.
 

paddi22

Well-Known Member
Joined
5 December 2010
Messages
6,297
Visit site
love mine to bits, but he's been years of vets bills and heartbreak. Got him to event but he just didn't have the temperament at all, even though he has lovely paces and can loose jump brilliantly. Eventually he turned into a nice little dressage horse but was always quirky. Super sharp and reared, but we got that sorted eventually. Then his sacroilliac and kissing spine got worse and now he's sitting in a field eating grass for the summer. He has the sweetest temperament and was my favourite horse to ride as he was so athletic and responsive, so heartbroken he's retired now.

I love exracers and would love to take another one on, but i honestly don't think i can afford the maintenance and vets bills on them. Mine is just a walking disaster!
 

Goldenstar

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 March 2011
Messages
46,517
Visit site
Mine is called J he's ten now and has been with me nearly five years .
He's a beautifully put together grey who was so nappy in training he never made it to the racecourse he had a home between training and me and was with various pro's (eventing ) between four and five .
He started event training but not far in he decided he disliked that as well and became nappy again .
I had always loved him so bought him at this point .
I quickly discovered he has a significant tooth/jaw problem and this took some time and a lot of money to sort and cost about £2000 a year in dentals ongoing.
He had very poor feet although these are now much much better he will always need very careful management in this area .
He's a very good flat work horse fun to train and enjoys it he's a great fun hack and galloping out hunting is one of life's best pleasures .
Kind to do he's a great friend and a tough but fair field boss he's my mate .
He's is not however a reliable jumper he's a good jumper he's just very cautious and really naughty is the only thing you can say about him.
He does not like jumping shows so I don't take him he enjoys most clinics but sometimes just decides don't like this one and can be a real pain
Apart from the issues mentained he's been very sound although he has a talent for getting random minor injuries just before you want to take him somewhere .
He beautiful and quirky he's matured into a very large and good looking horse .
 
Joined
28 February 2011
Messages
16,451
Visit site
Meet Gray Mountain. I took him home from work nearly 5 years ago now with a tendon that had literally torn in half. He had crap feet - to the extent that he had big metal staples across them.holding them together whilst he was in training.

Now? He has never had a days bother with his tendon. I am just careful what I do with him. His feet - he is unshod 8 months of the year and only gets fronts on when showing just to give him a wee bit of grip in the ring incase he slips. Why I worry about this at shows when he spends the winter cannoning about on any ground barefoot is beyond me! He can rock crunch with the best of them.now! He is a total dude and a half. Never had a days lameness since his tendon fixed, can be a bit cold backed when first brought back into work but that's it.

If you get one straight out of a yard ask the horses lass about it ;) they will tell the majority of the truth and the complete and utter truth if they don't like you and want to put you off *cough*speaking from.experience*cough* :D

GrayMo%20Dabbs_zps5xqoglov.jpg
 

Evie91

Well-Known Member
Joined
12 May 2012
Messages
2,172
Location
Warwickshire
Visit site
My share horse is an ex racer. He is fab, a real sweetie.
Owner had him off the track, evented to novice, thought to have the scope to go further,then he was diagnosed with KS. Had op made good recovery, unlikely to regain former glory though. Also has spavins, arthritic changes and had a sarcoid - he's 11 now.
He is kept fit and is sound. I can do bit of everything on him. He is the worlds greatest hack but takes his confidence from rider (I'm confident so he is too), is a dream to jump. I've yet to take him cross country and to the gallops but that's on the cards.
He loves his food, is a great, lovable character, really tries to please. Easy to do - easy going boy but can have little panics about funny things - adds to his character.
His stable mate is also an ex racer - events to novice, bit more high maintenance and quirky than my share.
I would certainly recommend a TB - can't beat them as far as I'm concerned :)
 

saskiahorsey

Well-Known Member
Joined
3 July 2013
Messages
202
Location
up north
Visit site
I have one got him straight out of racing ... Wouldnt settle at busy livery yard so moved him to fields 24/7 out with my mare and pony ... Hes thrived looks great totally chilled easy to handle ( stands in hurricane whilst i do rugs etc or pick feet not tied up) ridden work to commence once the weather gets better but hes been hardier than i thought ... Certainly no wimp... Well rugged of course but up to now happy as larry and no extra feed hes on high fibre like the rest with just linseed added ... Also took his shoes off as feet were crap but hes been let down since oct and they look fab now ... Hope hes as good ridden as he has been to do up to now ��
 

McFluff

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 April 2014
Messages
1,794
Visit site
My first horse of a lifetime was an ex-racer.
She had been retrained when I got her, and was brilliant to ride - light, responsive and quick to learn. She had been through rough times though and took time to trust. Once she did she would do anything for you.
She didn't need hard feed (looked great on grass and hay and went loopy on anything else). She did need a rug, but had to be careful not to over rug as she was warm (often in a lightweight when other is medium or heavy and she was comfy).
She did have bad feet when arrived but got much better kept barefoot and treated regularly with Kevin bacon stuff.
She liked being in work, was a one person horse and ultimately couldn't cope with rehab for kissing spines, so I made the tough decision.
Would happily go for another ex-racer if the 'person' was right for me - the time I had with her was amazing and she taught me so much.
 

Mrs G

Well-Known Member
Joined
12 August 2014
Messages
1,017
Visit site
When I got my ex racer I didn't have a great deal to spend but I found an athletic, nicely put together young horse, suitable as an all rounder, all for £1500. I've had him from a 4yr old, he's now 9yrs and I got him from a dealer who'd had him from the racing yard about 3 months and started his retraining. I couldn't have coped without lots of help as he has proved to be a tricky ******; prone to bucking and broncing! He is the least spooky horse going but he is excitable and very opinionated. He has good feet, grows a fabulously luxuriant winter coat, is quite a good doer and has only ever had the vet out (other than for routine vacs) for an allergic reaction to multiple wasp stings! I do think the racing industry can screw them up, either physically and/or mentally (eg mine cribs and I feed him with ulcers in mind), but if you get one that's come out of racing sound you stand a good chance.
 
Last edited:

skipper

Well-Known Member
Joined
3 March 2011
Messages
134
Visit site
I have one and he is, quite honestly, the best horse I have ever had cross my path. I think my lucky stars for him every day. :)

I bought him directly from the trainer, having been out of racing for around 2 months, he was 9 years old at the time, ex-steeplechaser who raced his whole life (preferring soft ground and longer distance so taxing conditions) with a degree of success, retired sound and passed a 5 stage vetting with flying colours when I bought him. He is the toughest, soundest little horse you could imagine! He arrived here with the most enormous, suppurating corns on 3 of his soles, stayed sound on them even after the farrier had dug them out. Only thing I do find with him is that he's difficult to put (and keep!) weight on, but this being said he did ok through the winter and we seem to have found a good balance now and he's gradually building up his topline and starting to look a bit less like a racehorse! Ridden wise he is a total delight, he makes me beam from ear to ear every day. Clever, willing and talented, he'll jump anything and his flatwork improves every time I sit on him. He was a bit aloof and 'stuck in his shell' when he arrived but we've got more of a bond and an understanding now and he has started to want to be around people more. He's so bold and nothing fazes him because he's seen nearly everything before. He's sensitive and isn't for everyone but if you're reasonably competent (and I am incredibly average!) and a quiet rider he'll try his heart out for you.

I've known some not-so-great ex-racers but I've known many fantastic ex-racers, personally I'd have another one any day of the week in a heartbeat. I really don't think I'd ever have another 'type' of horse now, I have far more behavioural and health issues with my Warmblood, and he was meant to be the dream competition horse!
 

claracanter

Well-Known Member
Joined
18 January 2012
Messages
1,626
Visit site
I have had mine for 5 years. He is quirky, intelligent and handsome. He has great feet, much better than my warmblood 's. He can give me the most incredible feeling when I'm riding him and although we do compete, some of our canters out hacking will remain the best things ever to do on a sunny afternoon.
Also with an ex racer you can do lots of ROR events which are great fun, subsidised and you can meet other people who just love TB's.
You sound like you are experienced so get one. A good TB is better than a good anything else in my opinion:)
 

Northern

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 February 2013
Messages
891
Visit site
I have had my ex-racer for almost five years now. I bought her as an untouched four year old (raced three times as a two year old and was subsequently sacked!). She has been the best horse, not a nasty bone in her body but can get quite hot when the occasion arises. She is the tough but fair boss of our herd, can be bolshy if you let her (she doesn't get away with that with me!). We do eventing and she honestly seems to really enjoy it, is careful and has excellent self preservation. She is currently not in work as we are sorting out some slight lameness issues (she has one wonky foreleg with some arthritic changes). Hopefully once we have those sorted we can get back to what we enjoy doing :) . She is probably one of the most low maintenance horses I know, stays fat (too fat!) on average grass and is very easy to keep looking healthy and happy.

Thoroughbreds here (Australia) are super common (and popular), especially for eventing. On the whole most of the TBs I know have been excellent allrounder horses. If you get one that is sound in body and temperament, you will have a cracker horse who will go all the way for you.

Obligatory pony picture to finish :)

 

Bunnymare

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 September 2013
Messages
71
Visit site
I had mine gifted to me after 2 years of loaning, she's now 12.

She's a sensitive type and hots up at the drop of a hat and we've had several scary moments, although now she's older she seems a lot happier and chilled. She loves her work, especially poles and jumping and we do low level dressage.

Her feet aren't too bad, fully shod but I do feed her a supplement for them. We've just had a lameness work up as she didn't seem quite right behind, fine in trot but stiff in canter, but so far the vet can't find a real problem. Apart from this we've had no huge vet's bills or bouts of illness or lameness.

I often thought about going back to something a little less high maintenance and highly strung but I can't see myself having anything else than a tb now. They're clever, quick to learn, courageous and mine is a very loving girl and she is much loved even with her quirks 😍
 

skipper

Well-Known Member
Joined
3 March 2011
Messages
134
Visit site
Don't let it worry you unduly, pick one sensibly and carefully and there's no reason they should cost you more in vet bills than any other horse. I knew my boy was tough and sound as he'd raced for the majority of his life with no issues, passed an extensive vetting and has proven himself to be sound. Sure, it may catch up with him later in life, but the same could be said of any hunter/competition horse/any horse that does a job that puts demands on them physically. He's prone to mud fever and a pillock out in the field so comes in with the odd cut or scrape reasonably regularly but they've never needed more than a quick wash and a blast of purple spray and have never made him lame.

For comparison, the TB cost me a pittance, the trainer and his owners were immensely keen for him to go to a good home so were honest and upfront with me, I had references and full reports available for him and he has been sound as a pound since I bought him, despite corns etc. (fairly usual when transferring to 'normal' shoes according to my farrier). My Warmblood is younger than the TB, cost me a fortune, has led a pampered life as a breeding stallion followed by a short stint showjumping, was sold as being totally sound and has since spent 5 months out of the year I have owned him out of work with lameness issues, has lost the vision for no clear reason in one eye, cost me an enormous amount of my savings in vet bills, has lost all of his value because of this and is going to have to be relegated to light hacking for the rest of his life. Any horse comes with inherent risks of unsoundness/vet bills but if you do what you can to ensure you are purchasing a sound horse then there's no reason a TB would be any more prone to it than any other horse. If they can stay sound throughout a racing career and in training the chances are they're reasonably tough and they can be such wonderful horses. I would honestly never have anything else now. :)
 
Joined
28 February 2011
Messages
16,451
Visit site
Walking vets bill. My advise would be go to one of the racehorse charities and loan one through them.

Not always. My big ginger lad has had 2 coli call outs which were just one visit 2 years apart and a tendon scan. That's in 8 years. Not a walking vets bill.

My big grey has had no vets call outs what so ever in 5 years. Not a walking vets bill.

My other wee grey who is no longer with me had a call out for choke 4years into my ownership of him and then the day he was pts. 8 years I had him for. Not a walking vets bill.

Maybe I have been lucky. Maybe because I don't mollycoddle them they toughen up like a native. Maybe because they only have 1 part of a routine which is no dinner before 6 pm - but could be anything until midnight - they don't colic.

Every horse is different and as I say, maybe I have just been very lucky with the ones I have had.
 

nikkimariet

Well-Known Member
Joined
18 December 2010
Messages
5,437
Location
N/A
Visit site
I've never had one, but what I would say is that people naturally post more about issues than they do about "good" horses ;)

Warmbloods have just as much bad press though?...

Walking vets bill. My advise would be go to one of the racehorse charities and loan one through them.

Don't be too quick... I know someone who's spent a fortune (through Insurance) on a prolific exracer bought through a charity. It has a pinned cannon that wasn't disclosed, ulcers and has had to go through KS surgery...

So just to blow everything out the water...

Here's Fig. By Galileo.

12938129_1335959496430966_6279015818580462589_n_zpsbzh6r6zt.jpg


He's now 12yo, I've had him since 7yo Dec 11. He retired sound Oct 11, having raced in Aus, Japan and the UK.

The only problems he's ever given me were doing the splits in the field last Autumn and thus developing a huge hematoma on his butt and needing a month off work, and a bout of ulcer attacks. The latter being rather expensive, but that's on me as I don't insure.

However, neither are 'injuries' solely sustained by the exracer contingent...

He's been to the Regionals prelim to advanced medium, the Area Festivals novice to advanced medium. He's got 70%+ prelim to advanced medium. He's been ROR Elementary and Medium champion. Top 10 placings at High Profiles and Premier Leagues. In his 4 years of dressage he has taken me to the Winter Nationals 4 times... Currently training PSG plus and aimed at that level sometime this year.

He jumps, he hacks, he goes to the gallops and the beach. No he's not a kids pony, no he's not a novice rider and no you couldn't put your granny on him. He's fussy, a poor doer, slightly hysterical in the field and although hacks fearlessly on his own he kinda winds up any company. High maintenance? Absolutely! But you know what? I don't care. He's a cuddly lovebug and a huge over achiever. He always tries his best and he's achieved amazing things. You can leave his stable door open, his tack on the door, change rugs in the field, he is fab at loading (and travelling, provided his back legs are tied together!) and I ride him bareback pretty frequently and have yet to die.

He's awesome. I brought him home for the sum of £1,000 because I fell in love with his personality. He moves like stink too, which is great, but I love his heart. I would definitely have another exracer in the future, without a doubt. I won't be having one straight after Fig though because he's just set too high a standard for another to immediately compare.

He also has great feet and is barefoot, just in case anyone is about to say they all have cr@p feet too!
 

dominobrown

Well-Known Member
Joined
15 March 2010
Messages
4,305
Location
North England
Visit site
One of the horses I loved from previous job is now up for sale. I pointed her myself.
Loads of plonkers interested in her from the fb ad and its so sad. She is really sensitive but easy, however in the wrong hands it would be a disaster. Had one person try her when I still worked there and a refused to sell her to them, she just hates riders who yank and kick, and there is never any need to anyways.
Nikki and fran, can you please buy her!!! I currently dont have time and space to buy her (no livery around here!) Would love to see her go to an experienced home with someone who ca ride!
 

HashRouge

Well-Known Member
Joined
16 February 2009
Messages
9,254
Location
Manchester
Visit site
Warmbloods have just as much bad press though?...



Don't be too quick... I know someone who's spent a fortune (through Insurance) on a prolific exracer bought through a charity. It has a pinned cannon that wasn't disclosed, ulcers and has had to go through KS surgery...

So just to blow everything out the water...

Here's Fig. By Galileo.

12938129_1335959496430966_6279015818580462589_n_zpsbzh6r6zt.jpg


He's now 12yo, I've had him since 7yo Dec 11. He retired sound Oct 11, having raced in Aus, Japan and the UK.

The only problems he's ever given me were doing the splits in the field last Autumn and thus developing a huge hematoma on his butt and needing a month off work, and a bout of ulcer attacks. The latter being rather expensive, but that's on me as I don't insure.

However, neither are 'injuries' solely sustained by the exracer contingent...

He's been to the Regionals prelim to advanced medium, the Area Festivals novice to advanced medium. He's got 70%+ prelim to advanced medium. He's been ROR Elementary and Medium champion. Top 10 placings at High Profiles and Premier Leagues. In his 4 years of dressage he has taken me to the Winter Nationals 4 times... Currently training PSG plus and aimed at that level sometime this year.

He jumps, he hacks, he goes to the gallops and the beach. No he's not a kids pony, no he's not a novice rider and no you couldn't put your granny on him. He's fussy, a poor doer, slightly hysterical in the field and although hacks fearlessly on his own he kinda winds up any company. High maintenance? Absolutely! But you know what? I don't care. He's a cuddly lovebug and a huge over achiever. He always tries his best and he's achieved amazing things. You can leave his stable door open, his tack on the door, change rugs in the field, he is fab at loading (and travelling, provided his back legs are tied together!) and I ride him bareback pretty frequently and have yet to die.

He's awesome. I brought him home for the sum of £1,000 because I fell in love with his personality. He moves like stink too, which is great, but I love his heart. I would definitely have another exracer in the future, without a doubt. I won't be having one straight after Fig though because he's just set too high a standard for another to immediately compare.

He also has great feet and is barefoot, just in case anyone is about to say they all have cr@p feet too!

Now that is a very, very nice example of how an ex-racer can turn out!
 

Nudibranch

Well-Known Member
Joined
21 April 2007
Messages
7,073
Location
Shropshire
Visit site
I've had 3 so far, so they must have something to recommend them. Current one is a total bimbo. Very handsome, although his conformation isn't too great, but he really is a bit pea brained. Perhaps "closer to his instincts" would be a kinder description! His feet are ok, and he is ridden unshod. Likes being groomed but not overly affectionate. My first was quite smart, and cuddly with it, but this one and the previous could take you or leave you really. He was quite successful in his career and was retired with a suspensory, but it healed well and he's been sound since. Injury wise, between the 3 they've had arthritis, narcolepsy, the aforementioned suspensory, and the bimbo ran straight through a fence while turned out for no apparent reason, racking up a good 2K in vet's bills. But nothing that couldn't happen to any horse I guess.
I like them, but my heart has always been with Cleveland Bays since I had the pleasure of owning one. She was the ultimate allrounder, with the heart of a lion. Plus my current 4yo is a TB x drum, so effectively a WB, and he is already shaping up as my horse of a lifetime.
 

Micropony

Well-Known Member
Joined
31 May 2015
Messages
1,360
Location
NW London
Visit site
Don't have one, but know a few pretty well. As long as you pick sensibly I wouldn't say they are more of a walking vet bill than any other horse. The Micropony's best mate is a 21yo ex NH horse who retired sound at 12 having been pin fired on all 4 legs (apparently they did it as a matter of routine back in the day ). His owner looks after him carefully, with regular bodywork etc, and he's never had problems with his back or his feet or anything else you would attribute to his first career. He will never achieve the dizzy heights of a Fig, but he's a super chap and really pretty hardy.
 

nikkimariet

Well-Known Member
Joined
18 December 2010
Messages
5,437
Location
N/A
Visit site
Nikki and fran, can you please buy her!!! I currently dont have time and space to buy her (no livery around here!) Would love to see her go to an experienced home with someone who ca ride!

Aww bless her! Sadly not got facilities for two :(

Now that is a very, very nice example of how an ex-racer can turn out!

He's so incredibly cute!

Fig is just too gorgeous. I love following your journey.

Thank you :)

As long as you pick sensibly I wouldn't say they are more of a walking vet bill than any other horse....

Exactly this! I picked sound and tough and sane!

He will never achieve the dizzy heights of a Fig, but he's a super chap and really pretty hardy.

Never say never ;) But also not everyone wants dizzy heights. Fig would have made a cracking all rounder or PC ride for a buzzy fun kid or younger rider.
 

Firewell

Well-Known Member
Joined
8 May 2008
Messages
7,817
Visit site
Mine is such a doll I love him. I got him as a 4yr old, he had only raced once for various different reasons.
He always has been so laid back and easy. I've had so much fun with him. He loves to work and is up for any job. He will jump *anything*, he never stops, he is scopey and so genuine, he will help you out time and time again and never holds it against you. I can bury him into 1m20 and he will chip in and pop over. He knows when something is important to me and he simply doesn't let me down.
He's also the most low maintenance horse in the world. He lives out, eats only grass, hay and a balancer, has great feet, he isn't clingy, he doesn't fuss if his routine changes. You can put him anywhere, on his own, with friends, in, out, whatever. He is a babe for the vet, dentist, to clip, farrier, will stand for hours to be pampered, loads, travels brilliant. You don't have to ride him everyday and he doesn't need lunging after time off.
He has a gorgeous in your pocket personality. He is bright, cheeky, cuddly and an absolute beauty. He fell out of the beautiful tree and hit every branch on the way down.
He's tough, sound, clean legged.
He is a proper horse though. He can have a buck and a leap about when excited (only 1 or 2 and they can be big but not enough to make you fall) and when I least expect it he likes to keep me on my toes hacking with a spook- spin-run manouver (often at nothing and on the way home!). He also likes to duck out his stable and bog off when I open the door, it's pretty meditated and only occurs when he has lulled me into a false sense of security by being perfect for months. That's his personality though, he thinks he is funny but sometimes he will cross the line and needs a confident rider/handler to say No and for that reason I am always respectful of him.
He's a fabulous one of a kind horse.
 

Northern

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 February 2013
Messages
891
Visit site
Walking vets bill. My advise would be go to one of the racehorse charities and loan one through them.

I don't think it's fair to paint a whole breed with the one brush. Sure many of them have issues, but so do many other breeds... My mare has never needed a (non routine) vet visit until a few weeks ago, that's in almost five years of ownership.
 

Victoria25

Well-Known Member
Joined
5 August 2011
Messages
961
Visit site
I got an ex racer straight from the track (last race was about two weeks earlier) - she walked straight into the box, got out the other end, walked down the main road half asleep, got turned out for a few months, I got on her and rode her like she'd been a riding horse all of her life (after a two year successful racing career) ... and that was three years ago - the most quiet, docile horse Ive ever seen - I'd let a 5 year old kid ride her down the main road in rush hour on her) ... fab horse!
 

Damnation

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 February 2008
Messages
9,663
Location
North Cumbria
Visit site
This was Poutu.



She was my Ex Racer, bought at 4 straight off the track because I couldn't afford anything else as a 16 year old.

Pros:
She was good in traffic, amazing in the school, novices could ride her, good feet (one abscess in 3 and a half years and 1 lost shoe) and only shod infront. Could be left alone in the field and stable after all her mates had come in and not care. Good doer, not stressy at all, good to clip, box, shoe, hack in company. If she didn't have her back problem (below) she would have been amazing. Not a world beater but I recon we could have got to Elementary/Medium. She was so trainable and willing to please.

Cons: To get to that level of "manners" took alot of blood sweat and tears as she was paticularly dominant but once she knew where the line was she was a dobbin. Could NOT hack alone, very nappy. Bronked me off 3 times. Turns out she had a slipped disk in her spine just behind the saddle area and had to be PTS. She also had a huge scar on her shoulder from a field injury which is how I think she did her back but that was before I bought her.

I learnt so much and I wouldn't change what happened. I loved my little TB. You can tell her back wasn't good in the pic above. Hips tucked under when she stood.

I now have Buffy, she is technically a TB X but she is a KWPN registered Dutch Warmblood.







Pros: Amazing ground manners, good to clip, box, shoe, no stable vices. Doesn't buck, rear, nap, pull to grass or even pull at all. Can go out with mares, foals, geldings, a mixture of all of the above! Impeccable ground manners.

Cons: Complete and utter stress head under saddle, once she see's red, hold on tight! She was imported from Holland as a rising 7 year old and I don't know what they did to her but its traumatised her. CANNOT ride or approach her with a whip and completely hypersensative to your leg aids and so sharp to ride. If someone else uses a whip and she hears it she freaks out. I have never hit her and neither did her previous home. She has panic bolted with me. She also has a torn muscle in her hindquater which makes her pretty unsellable aswell as the fact she is 15 and been out of work for 2 years. She is sound though.
 
Top