Testosterone/hormone levels - Rig Test

Kenzo

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Does anyone you know the difference in the amount of testosterone/hormone etc levels that are acceptable for a gelding, what levels they are for a proven rig and what they usually are for a stallions?

I know there is some kind of chart which the lab go by when they have tested the blood but I've tried looking on he net but can't quite seem to find anything.

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any info would be great.
 

kal40

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Have you tried calling your vet? Someone in their office might be able to point you in the right direction.
 

BeckyDiamond

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Hi Kenzo

Your vet will be able to perform the test but having spoken to my vet about this a couple of years ago, the test can often turn out to be a waste of money.

My horse (ex racehorse) will sometimes display quite extreme stallion beahviour and has even been known to mount my friends poor mare! He can get extremely terratorial around mares, aggressive to other geldings and even refuse to be seperated from "his" mare(s). I spoke to my vet and he informed me that it's quite uncommon for a horse to be a true "rig" and that my horses behaviour was probably learnt behaviour due to being cut late, rather than behaviour caused by any hormone inbalance

I usually find that, if he becomes difficult to handle (aka a right pain in the arse!), seperating him from any mares for a couple of weeks usually settles him down

Apologies if this doesn't answer your sepcific question but may save you some money!
 

Kenzo

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Thank you both for your replies,

Yes the blood test was done last Monday, lab results were due in today, vet said he'd ring me when they get the info back from the lab.

I just wondered if they would just give me a straight yes or no and thats it or tell me a bit more about he scale they measure it by, for example no he's not a rig but does have a higher level of testosterone than normal geldings which is bla bla % or less but in your horses cases its bla bla %

The vet did explain to me the 2 operations that could be done (if he was) but that depends on if there is just a certain amount of tissue left from a castration that can still cause the levels to increase, if both are still retained (never actually dropped) or if there is just one still inside, again depends if they are up the near the liver or behind up near his bottom area.

I honestly don't think he is, I just had it done because other people on the yard have suggested that he might be so its for everyone's piece of mind that's all.

Thank you for replies.
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f_s_

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I agree with the OP that rig tests are often a waste of time. True rigs are rare.

Also,(as in our case) the cause is probably learnt behaviour due to being cut late. We have had to put ours on regumate, and he even goes over the top of this!!!
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I also find that as long as he is with "his" mare, he's not too bothered. He is dangerous though, certainly not for the novice owner/handler!!! Please be careful, as riggy horses can be very unpredictable
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(I'm sure you are well aware of this btw
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kal40

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I havn't had much experience with horsey blood tests but a lot of experience with human ones. They tend to have 'normal ranges' and if the readings are outside (at either end of the scale) then thats when its flagged up.

Problem is that no-one knows what the starting point is for each individual (animal or human). The other problem is some docs/vets don't treat a condition even though it is borderline, they like to wait until its over the line.

Good luck with the test. It'll be interesting to hear the result.
 

Kenzo

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Oh yes I'm careful and I don't think he is, its just to stop everyone else worrying if you see what I mean, he's a lot better to handle now than 18 months ago, he used to attacked me in the school and rear at me when catching him so I've seen him at his worst trust me on that one! but he was not very well handled ...he didnt even know how to lead when I got him (he was a month off turning 3) so it was just a case learning the ropes and being mastered, so all that was expected.

The vets couldnt even tell me how much the test was going to be, I hope its not too expensive
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, they said its the lab that bill me not he vets.
 

Foxford

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Kenzo - my friends horse had this test last year. The results came back "inconclusive". Her horse was a 4yo Fresian who had been imported into the UK at 3. Passport said gelding, and he had a castration scar - behaviour said otherwise. If I remember correctly, they ultrasounded him and found one testicle quite high up. When they opened him up they found he had two inguinally retained testicles. PM me if you want to know any more. He is fine now!
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