Tough decision

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8 July 2021
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I've had a rough time in both my personal and professional life recently, lost a massive amount of money so things are tight financially. I turned my 3yo out to save on time/money but he can only stay there until they switch to their winter grazing in October ish, long story but basically he was cut late and whilst isn't coltish in wanting to mount, he's possessive of the mares which won't work when they're in a smaller space with haylage out - he'll end up guarding it and causing fights. I don't particularly want to bring him back to the yard as winter turnout isn't great and it would obviously increase my workload.

On paper it makes sense to sell, he's not an easy horse, I'm currently too fat to ride him once backed and I'm very time poor as well as money being tighter than I'd like. The thing is, is he's my dream horse - everything I've always wanted and I'm very attached to him. Classic head vs heart decision.

Ultimately there's only me who can decide how to proceed but wonder if you guys have any words of wisdom? I'm toying with the idea of finding gelding only turnout and holding off backing until 5 or 6 when I have more time?

(new account as you know how gossip travels!)
 

bonny

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I wouldn’t leave him till he’s 5 or 6 especially as you say he’s not easy now. I think it sounds like a better option to sell him and then start again in a couple of years when your situation will hopefully be better.
 

paddi22

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When you say he's your dream horse, is that because of particular breeding? because if it isn't I'd probably just sell. Market is so good at the moment. You could potentially pay 3 years of grass livery and end up with a horse that temperament-wise isn't what you want and there's always a chance he won't be a fit for the discipline you want to do. Also realistically is there a chance he will always be a bit light for you riding wise too? when you say he isn't easy, would this potentially translate to ridden attitude? Theres no harm leaving him a few years before backing and that will stand to him. it's just you have a few 'buts' there that would tip it to selling for me.
 

Tarragon

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Is it your intention to work with him on the ground over the next couple of years while he is turned out with the geldings? Or just leave him be until you try backing him?
I think that if you are time poor and not in a good place financially, I would save your money and sell him now. He is at a good age for someone else to pick up and if you haven't the time to start his training I am not sure that another 2 years just being a horse in a herd will be in his best interest.
If you are not paying for his livery, you might be in a financial position to buy your perfect horse sooner than you think.
 
Joined
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In your position I would look for gelding only turnout and leave the backing until he is older, which might be better timing for you, anyway. I don't like the idea of backing 3 yr olds, as a matter of course.
Ah sorry if it wasn't clear, the intention wasn't to back him this year anyway - mentally he's ready for a bit of groundwork but physically he's nowhere near ready for any proper work, I'm not a fan of rushing babies either.

I'd originally planned to leave him where he was and reevaluate come spring but that's no longer an option. Decent turnout isn't easy to find round here, fell really lucky with this place but she doesn't have the space to accommodate his antics
 
Joined
8 July 2021
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When you say he's your dream horse, is that because of particular breeding? because if it isn't I'd probably just sell. Market is so good at the moment. You could potentially pay 3 years of grass livery and end up with a horse that temperament-wise isn't what you want and there's always a chance he won't be a fit for the discipline you want to do. Also realistically is there a chance he will always be a bit light for you riding wise too? when you say he isn't easy, would this potentially translate to ridden attitude? Theres no harm leaving him a few years before backing and that will stand to him. it's just you have a few 'buts' there that would tip it to selling for me.
No, breeding isn't anything particularly desirable and you're totally right re him possibly not being what I want under saddle, especially given that he's not the most straightforward to handle/manage. Deep down I know the right thing is to sell, just hard to admit it.

Do I want the pressure of having to obsessively watch my weight and deal with quirks? Not particularly.
 

bonny

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No, breeding isn't anything particularly desirable and you're totally right re him possibly not being what I want under saddle, especially given that he's not the most straightforward to handle/manage. Deep down I know the right thing is to sell, just hard to admit it.

Do I want the pressure of having to obsessively watch my weight and deal with quirks? Not particularly.
I think you’ve answered your own question .
 

Littlebear

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I would also sell in your position, it is hard but none of it sounds right for you at the present time. You can always go back to it with a more suitable horse later down the line x
 

windand rain

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Hmmm it would seem the best option to sell but I cannot see an issue with him being backed at 6. I also don't think horses care much what they do as long as they have food, company water and someone to check they haven't got hurt or sick. There needs are simple it is humans that complicate things. On the other hand if you need or want to sell now is the time, prices are high, he is a good age and you are cash and time limited and as you say he may not be the right size for you to be comfortable riding. Thing is if you back him at 6 for many purchasers it will be an older green horse so reduces your market
 
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meleeka

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Are you likely to be light enough to ride him when he’s 6?

I don’t think you need to rush into any decisions if you can find turnout for him. It’ll be a good couple of years before you need to worry about him being ‘wasted’.
 

Pinkvboots

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I would find a gelding only turnout for now then look at the situation in a while his only 3 so you could 're think in a year, then maybe find a yard with suitable turnout so you can start ground work and backing.
 

SatansLittleHelper

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While I think you probably should sell if that's what your gut is telling you, I thought I'd mention my situation.
My younger horse came to me 2 years ago as a 4 Yr old, was then backed and ridden away over 9 weeks last year just as lockdown hit the first time. He's done next to nothing since as he has been very physically immature and now, at 6, is finally looking like he's up to being restarted. Let me tell you that he gives zero shits about not working lol. However, he is a very, very easy horse to have around.
 

Gloi

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Little update - he went on sales livery and sold within a few days. He's in a fab home and I know it was the right decision, however hard it was to go through with! Thanks everyone
Sad for you to go through it but probably the best in the circumstances. Now concentrate on getting everything in your life in order so you can get your new dream horse in a couple of years.
 

Cluelessblonde

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I was going to say sell but I'm glad you came that decision once your at peace with it. I have sold my heart horse because it was too sharp and I'm a mum now and I just don't feel comfortable taking those risks anymore. You will honestly be thankful when ur back on ur feet and in a better head space
 
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