Trailer woes (loading)

esselle

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Thank you for all these wonderful suggestions. Have only just picked up these last few replies.

We will try again over the weekend. I really hope it doesn't take the whole summer though as someone suggested as that will mean missed her whole first season showjumping :-(
 

twiggy2

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after witnessing a couple of big accidents over the years that both involved horses that owners had taken months/years trying to be endlessly patient and working within the horses comfort zone I would get professional help, my personal choice for that help would be guy robertson horsemanship, he will work with horse and once things are safe he will work with horse /owner and handler.

an extra few hundred pounds now to have a horse that is safe to load on any trailer is nothing and means you can get out and do stuff
 

muckypony

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Patience is the key. I spent over 3 hours on several occasions trying to load my boy and someone actually even told me they thought he was 'unfixable'! I fed him on the lorry or ramp (depending how far he managed to get!) for a few weeks and I think I've cracked it. No pressure, just praise every step forwards even if it isnt all the way into the trailer.

Mine is still nervous when the ramp goes up but once in I just have to go. Some days I still just feed him on their.

Be patient, you'll get there!
 

TarrSteps

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Thank you for all these wonderful suggestions. Have only just picked up these last few replies.

We will try again over the weekend. I really hope it doesn't take the whole summer though as someone suggested as that will mean missed her whole first season showjumping :-(

Honestly, if it's taking that sort of time GET HELP. There is no reason for that. I'm with twiggy in that loading is an essential skill and something that a good trainer can both sort and help you continue successfully in short order.

Quite apart from competing, I think there is a health issue at stake. What if the horse needs emergency transport for some reason? Even sedation only goes so far and it's often not a good option for an ill or injured horse anyway.

I don't think force is the way forward but I want to be SURE I can get any horse I'm responsible for loaded, wherever, whenever.
 

Moomin1

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Honestly, if it's taking that sort of time GET HELP. There is no reason for that. I'm with twiggy in that loading is an essential skill and something that a good trainer can both sort and help you continue successfully in short order.

Quite apart from competing, I think there is a health issue at stake. What if the horse needs emergency transport for some reason? Even sedation only goes so far and it's often not a good option for an ill or injured horse anyway.

I don't think force is the way forward but I want to be SURE I can get any horse I'm responsible for loaded, wherever, whenever.

I fully agree, though in real emergencies then sedation is always an option to load, though obviously a last resort and certainly not what I would like to rely on.
 

MagicMelon

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I think you just need to practice literally every single day so it becomes no big deal to her. With a bad loader I had, I would give the horse his dinner in it every night, if he didnt go in then he didnt get his food. I would definately only try loading though when you have the time to get her in and not to end on a bad note of her refusing to go in as then she's won! If she refuses to go in then she gets to go back to her field/stable/friends!
 

TarrSteps

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Genuine question for people who have used the 'little and often' approach. . .how do you "practice" if the horse won't go in reasonably calmly in the first place and you can't "quit" without getting it completely in? Would it not make sense to have a system for preparing and then introducing the process in doable chunks? That's all a professional is going to do (me included), just that the whole process will be addressed in a session or two and then the "practice" will involve repeating that perfected system. How do you go about it if you don't have a workable system?

I do get the idea of letting very young horses "play" with loading, letting them climb and out, but I've not found this as successful with older horses that have developed an issue. I'm also not sure it's the safest course with a box and it can be hard on the vehicle if the baby horses decide to, say, strip all the rubber off it!
 
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