Training treats

KHippo

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What do you use? Struggling in training sessions as my pup has no interest in food most of the time when outside, which is making heelwork a challenge... Tried chicken, sausage, hotdogs, cheese. Looking for suggestions on the stinkiest tastiest treats to try & keep a spaniel nose busy & focussed on me instead of the floor!

Pic to prove she can have eyes on me sometimes 😂

AB96E22C-5061-4CDD-B61F-AAFBF149870D.jpeg
 
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Oh my goodness what a cutie:). That is the face of a person who can't be easily fooled, lollol

I hope the cowlick in the center of her head never goes away:):):)

My Rottweiler is a food monger (I would call her worse but it would get me a trip to the woodshed:). All she needs are those Milkbone Minis, lollol

How about some of those salmon treats that come in foil bags, stink to high heaven, and have to be kept sealed in the refrigerator?
 

Blazingsaddles

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What do you use? Struggling in training sessions as my pup has no interest in food most of the time when outside, which is making heelwork a challenge... Tried chicken, sausage, hotdogs, cheese. Looking for suggestions on the stinkiest tastiest treats to try & keep a spaniel nose busy & focussed on me instead of the floor!

Pic to prove she can have eyes on me sometimes 😂

View attachment 31161
Training indoors without distractions might be more useful for the time being. You have a breed that is easily distracted😀
 

KHippo

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Training indoors without distractions might be more useful for the time being. You have a breed that is easily distracted😀
Thank you, despite refering to her as the pup, she’s actually nearly 8 months old & 12 weeks into her gundog training. She has nailed heelwork in the house I just need to up the game in the treats department to regain some focus when out & about in places where the floor smells more interesting than chicken 🤦🏻‍♀️
 

CorvusCorax

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Very boring answer but I use the dog's normal food allowance and the dog must work for his food. If the dog is not hungry/knows he is being fed anyway, especially if food is not his primary drive then the job will be harder. If the dog learns this (listening to mummy = food) from a young age your life will be a lot easier.

If prey or hunt drive is higher (which it probably will be) then you need to channel that. The main problem is with recall/engagement is that most human beings are very boring indeed and we forget to make ourselves more interesting and important than all the distractions ;)
 

twiggy2

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She looks very much like our pups from last year, where is she from?
Try building up with distractions slowly so you can practice what you want rather than fighting what you don't.
Indoors, then garden, then disused car park with no there people or dogs etc etc
 

KHippo

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Thank you all for your suggestions. A ball will keep her attention but she will be 2m ahead running backwards while she waits for you to throw it, so no good for heelwork :rolleyes:

She really is very good for her age, stop whistle, retrieving to hand & steadiness all going well - she just gets distracted 50% of the time during heelwork as its not very exciting - she can do it & half of the time she is great! If I try to make it more interesting with changes of pace/direction, occasional ball throws as a reward, then we end up with "Tigger on acid"!

We are only working with very minimal distractions at the moment during practice, although even in our weekly classes with 6 other dogs around, on a "distracted day" it is the floor which is more interesting than anything else! Still, good to know she can use her nose!

She looks very much like our pups from last year, where is she from?
She came from a breeder near Horsham, West Sussex?
 

druid

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I've trained a few spaniels now. All heel work is started on a lead, set off with dog at heel in sit and strike off with the leg furthest from the dog. Walk purposely forward focusing on a point on the horizon. As soon as the dog forges ahead, is distracted etc make a sharp turn 90 degrees towards them and walk straight ahead again. You effectively spend a bit of time doing squares until pup learns its his/her responsibility to remain at heel. I phase the lead out by draping it over their back slowly during the sessions once on lead heel is confirmed. Keep sessions short 3-4min is plenty. Heeling is hardworking for a dogs brain

I regularly hunt one and heel 2-3 off lead at the sane time :)
 

KHippo

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I've trained a few spaniels now. All heel work is started on a lead, set off with dog at heel in sit and strike off with the leg furthest from the dog. Walk purposely forward focusing on a point on the horizon. As soon as the dog forges ahead, is distracted etc make a sharp turn 90 degrees towards them and walk straight ahead again. You effectively spend a bit of time doing squares until pup learns its his/her responsibility to remain at heel. I phase the lead out by draping it over their back slowly during the sessions once on lead heel is confirmed. Keep sessions short 3-4min is plenty. Heeling is hardworking for a dogs brain

I regularly hunt one and heel 2-3 off lead at the sane time :)
Thank you Druid - I am now very dizzy! But I think we made progress so will see how we get on over the next few days. Maybe we will make it out of the car park soon o_O
 

druid

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Hope it helps...it usually clicks after a few days but you do need to persist in proofing it! Also, only ever say "heel" or whatever your command is when the dog is *at heel* to start....otherwise it becomes meaningless to the dog!
 
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I've trained a few spaniels now. All heel work is started on a lead, set off with dog at heel in sit and strike off with the leg furthest from the dog. Walk purposely forward focusing on a point on the horizon. As soon as the dog forges ahead, is distracted etc make a sharp turn 90 degrees towards them and walk straight ahead again. You effectively spend a bit of time doing squares until pup learns its his/her responsibility to remain at heel. I phase the lead out by draping it over their back slowly during the sessions once on lead heel is confirmed. Keep sessions short 3-4min is plenty. Heeling is hardworking for a dogs brain

I regularly hunt one and heel 2-3 off lead at the sane time :)

Fizzing eck, I'm just happy to get home in one piece :p
 
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