Treats WITHOUT alfalfa in them?

Joined
22 December 2012
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Hi!

I’m wanting to buy a tub of treats for my horse, but all the ones we have ordered so far have alfalfa in them (even ones which said otherwise on the website!!). My girl seems to be quite sensitive on alfalfa so we cut it out of her feed completely.
Does anyone know who sells a tub of treats without it in?

Thanks!
 

ester

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I don't think the agrobs meadow kisses do. though you can also use their weisencobs for treats if you are up for buying a big bag!

I'm not sure if the equimins do, they only specify plant fibres.

ooh Knew Id forgotten one, pure feeds are grass based.
 
Joined
22 December 2012
Messages
9
I don't think the agrobs meadow kisses do. though you can also use their weisencobs for treats if you are up for buying a big bag!

I'm not sure if the equimins do, they only specify plant fibres.

ooh Knew Id forgotten one, pure feeds are grass based.
I’ll take a look at those! Thank you!
 

Nasicus

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Think I'm turning into a spokesperson here lmao, but I really rate Kramers Haycobs as treats.

https://www.kramer.co.uk/Horse/Horse-Feed-Supplements/Hard-Feed-Forage/Hay-Cobs

They're chunky treat sized, take a bit of effort to chew so they don't just gobble them down, and they're just hay, so no molasses or alfalfa or any other bits and bobs. Good in a treat ball, don't crumble to dust in your pocket, and the horses think they're great!

Plus it's £6.99 for 10kg, which is brilliant value when you compare it against the cost of a 1kg bag of treats.
 

cauda equina

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I think carrots are as safe as anything
The only downside is they make your pockets soggy if you cut them into chunks
 

TPO

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Feedmark's Herbalicious treats are alfa free I think. There is wheat feed, wheat, grass meal and molasses in them but no alfa (unless the grass referred to is Lucerne but not stated as such) - I was gifted a tub and randomly read the ingredients last night.
 

holeymoley

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Think I'm turning into a spokesperson here lmao, but I really rate Kramers Haycobs as treats.

https://www.kramer.co.uk/Horse/Horse-Feed-Supplements/Hard-Feed-Forage/Hay-Cobs

They're chunky treat sized, take a bit of effort to chew so they don't just gobble them down, and they're just hay, so no molasses or alfalfa or any other bits and bobs. Good in a treat ball, don't crumble to dust in your pocket, and the horses think they're great!

Plus it's £6.99 for 10kg, which is brilliant value when you compare it against the cost of a 1kg bag of treats.
Do you by any chance know exactly what is in them? I got the catalogue for Kramer the other day and would love to buy Lots! Liked the look of some feed stuff but there didn’t seem to be exact ingredients or %’s and I have a very sensitive insulin resistant horse.
 

supsup

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If you follow the link, there's a small red "pdf" symbol underneath the pictures. If you click of it you get a pdf of the bag label. It says 100% meadow hay for the hay cobs, but the analysis for those isn't very detailed. Not sure about other feeds, but I'd check the webpage and look for the link to the pdf of the label.
 

holeymoley

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Brilliant thank you. Never noticed the pdf before. I would’ve thought there would be a sugar % as it is meadow hay. Hmm.
 

supsup

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Brilliant thank you. Never noticed the pdf before. I would’ve thought there would be a sugar % as it is meadow hay. Hmm.
The laws don't require the label analysis to show sugar (just the usual, energy, protein, ash, etc.). Ten years ago, none of the UK brands did either, until there was enough pressure/interest from customers to know the sugar/starch levels of the feeds they buy. I also think that for a natural product such as hay cobs, it's difficult on a practical levels to give an accurate level of sugar as this will change from crop to crop, and they probably don't want to test each batch and change the label accordingly (or be caught out giving an average value which then isn't accurate for a particular batch).
I do sometimes wonder how accurate the levels are that are provided by some of the UK suppliers of plain grass products. Do they really manage to grow that consistent a crop, and do they test regularly enough so that the number on the bag corresponds to what's inside? I'm guessing they've tested the occasional batch, and go with an average value.
 
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