Unable to load cob - best method to get her on?

Ranyhyn

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Last weekend I was unable to load my cob. I was borrowing a friends lorry, side loading and I dont think she understood the question. So anyway, I had to go somewhere, so didn't have time to fart arse about with her then. So am borrowing kind friends lorry to practise this Sunday.

Do you think it will be beneficial to bring her excellently behaved horse with her - to show mine the idea OR do you think that wont help at all?

She's not at all food motivated, because she's built like Heather from Eastenders and she's as stubborn as a mule BUT not frightened. She has the look of one, either deeply confused or deeply deeply disgusted with the question.

Any thoughts greatfully receieved.
 

L&M

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Firstly I would try to load her with another horse - if she happily goes on then, you know it is not the issue of being side loading and she should understand the concept.

I have found a dually halter a great help for a non loader - it works on a pressure and release reward system, and although trickier to use with a side loading lorry (I have one so can speak from experience!), can still be effective.

Good luck!
 
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kerrieberry2

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I would probably try and load her on her own, as I have found that once a horse is already on those side loading lorrys the area for the 2nd horse looks very small, so if you have a big mare, she might like A LOT of space, so might load better if she has more space!

the only time I'd try with another horse is if, its her best mate, and she tends to do anything that horse does! otherwise they might pull faces and it might make it more difficult!

when I got my youngster, he was unhandled he wouldn't load on a side loading lorry, we covered the ramp and the floor with straw and just stood on the ramp with a feed bucket, talking and ignoring him! after a while he walked up to the bucket and basically loaded himself! so the straw option might help too?
 

STRIKER

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Reverse her on, tapping her chest so she walks backwards, when on give her some treats and tie her up for a minute then let down and do it again. Can you make the ramp level with the box rather than at an angle this can put them off as the sound is worrying
 

happyclappy

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i would only use another horse if they are the best of friends and not keen on being seperated. bonus this way is you wont need to load both every time as your horse will be used to being alone.

patience is needed, let her see, start placing her hooves or you can slowly place a hoof onto the ramp, wait then anther hoof. i agree with keeping the ramp as level as possible. my mare hates steep ramps but now accepts shallow ramps. with each small achievement, praise, praise, praise


good luck,
 

meandmyself

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Put her on a lunge line. Every time she refuses to load, then put her to work. (Backing up, circles.) Lots of praise when she goes forward even a little bit.
 

teapot

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Patience and repetitive practice. So if it means you spend weekend after weekend just stood with her on the ramp so be it.
 

lelly

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I too agree with using a dually head collar. Just a few training sessions and she will learn to walk forward when you ask. I have had great results using a dually.
 

Ranyhyn

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The ramp is very low already as friends lorry is a new van conversion but I have thought about the camber as the top door is quite low and this could well be causing an issue.
She loads perfectly on trailer and travels quietly, so Im satisfied she's not scared - just not sure what to do.

On the groundwork suggestions I think this could be good, I have done a lot of work with her handling because she was prone to being a typical bolshy cob and I now have her walking next to me, starting and stopping as I do with zero contact on the lead.

Will update you how we do tomorrow, thanks for all your suggestions.
 
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