Use of Vitex Agnus-Castus in place of Prascend

wickedwilfred

Well-Known Member
Joined
2 August 2010
Messages
55
I live in France and have a horse on Prascend, where it costs twice as much. Does anyone have experience of using Vitex Agnus-Castus which is listed on the internet as an alternative.
 

Hepsibah

Well-Known Member
Joined
24 January 2016
Messages
526
Yes. Agnus Castus can be helpful in masking some of the symptoms and for some horses who can't tolerate Prascend it is the only alternative but isn't a treatment. I used it for my mare for a while before having her tested and put on Prascend but the difference it made was negligable in comparison to the Prascend. If I had another diagnosed, I wouldn't bother with the Agnus Castus.
 

ycbm

Well-Known Member
Joined
30 January 2015
Messages
41,176
You can also use mucuna, velvet bean, it is used in India to treat Parkinsons. There was a study done in the Netherlands in horses where it performed well for Cushings if the translation I read was a good one. Pergolide is a Parkinsons treatment, not now sanctioned officially due to heart valve issues, but it works for parkinsonism, as does mucuna. It's available on eBay.
.
 

wickedwilfred

Well-Known Member
Joined
2 August 2010
Messages
55
My mare’s blood test was inconclusive. It was only other indications like her age, 23, and holding on to her coat that led my vet to prescribe Prascend as a safeguard. She has been on low dose for over a year now - half a tablet every other day and her health is good, which is why I am thinking the Agnus Castus might be all she needs. Only one way to find out.
 

meleeka

Well-Known Member
Joined
14 September 2001
Messages
6,880
Location
Hants, England
My mare’s blood test was inconclusive. It was only other indications like her age, 23, and holding on to her coat that led my vet to prescribe Prascend as a safeguard. She has been on low dose for over a year now - half a tablet every other day and her health is good, which is why I am thinking the Agnus Castus might be all she needs. Only one way to find out.
Mine just had an untidy looking coat. I had her on Agnus castus for around a year, but it made no difference. Three weeks on Prascend and her coat was normal again.
 

LeneHorse

Well-Known Member
Joined
8 April 2007
Messages
2,561
Do you get your horse tested annually? I would suggest if you take your horse off the prascend you should get another test once the drug is out of her system just to make sure that her levels are still low. It could be that the prascend has been controlling her levels while she's been on it.
There is also a very good Facebook group for PPID owners which is full of useful information (sorry I can't do links on my phone).
 

tatty_v

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 March 2015
Messages
1,138
My vet has just moved me from prascend to pergoquin as it’s cheaper. Not significantly so I don’t think but might be worth a check?
 

wickedwilfred

Well-Known Member
Joined
2 August 2010
Messages
55
Thanks for all the advice. I’ve had the mare since she was two (now 23). In all that time, she has been trouble free. A couple of years ago, she suddenly went down with laminitis, which I put down to a bad reaction to a wormer - liquid and foul smelling diarrhoea for 2 days. This coincided with a cresty neck and and holding her coat, hence the diagnosis of possible Cushings. The laminitis lasted for 2 months, cleared up a week after I put her of Heiro, and has never returned. Her feeding schedule has been back to normal since - unrestricted but not lush grazing and low carb feed with supplements once a day, but we keep her on the low dose Prascend as a control.
 

Gloi

Well-Known Member
Joined
8 May 2012
Messages
7,312
Location
Lancashire
My mare’s blood test was inconclusive. It was only other indications like her age, 23, and holding on to her coat that led my vet to prescribe Prascend as a safeguard. She has been on low dose for over a year now - half a tablet every other day and her health is good, which is why I am thinking the Agnus Castus might be all she needs. Only one way to find out.
If Prascend isn't causing any problems why risk stopping it? Has she had further blood tests?
 

wickedwilfred

Well-Known Member
Joined
2 August 2010
Messages
55
S
If Prascend isn't causing any problems why risk stopping it? Has she had further blood tests?
Sorry, obviouisly lost in the thread. I live in France where a box of 160 Prascend tablets will cost €360, in contrast to £170 in the UK, which I now cannot access thanks to Brexit rules. Just looking for a cheaper alternative, if there is one.
 

planete

Well-Known Member
Joined
5 May 2010
Messages
2,430
Location
New Forest
Is there any possibility you could get it cheaper from another EU country? Perhaps try enquiring on the PPID Facebook group from german or italian members. Sorry if this a dumb suggestion as I have no idea of the rules.
 

NOISYGIRL2

Well-Known Member
Joined
15 January 2019
Messages
126
My horse wouldn't tolerate prascend so had him on BOVA pergolide paste, ask your vet for the cost, he was a different horse on it. I wouldn't use chaste berry instead of it, as it will only help with some symptoms, IF it helps at all. Equine America do crumbles which can be fed by hand so you know they've had it.
 

NOISYGIRL2

Well-Known Member
Joined
15 January 2019
Messages
126
My mare’s blood test was inconclusive. It was only other indications like her age, 23, and holding on to her coat that led my vet to prescribe Prascend as a safeguard. She has been on low dose for over a year now - half a tablet every other day and her health is good, which is why I am thinking the Agnus Castus might be all she needs. Only one way to find out.
Has she been tested since ? mine was borderline april 2015 ACTH 29 then went to 120 in 6 months. It may be worth a retest or there is a more accurate test TRH stimulation test
 

PurBee

Well-Known Member
Joined
23 November 2019
Messages
3,186
In humans, using vitex agnus castus takes a while before any effects are felt, so potentially the same in horses - i.e dont give up after 2 weeks because there’s ‘no change’….give a good couple of months.

This study of it on cushings horses is interesting. It improved condition/symptoms in some, not all. So worth trying imo.

Of course, theres various other aspects about horse management that can skew results - this particular study was done at home by owners, not in a ‘lab setting’ with each horse receiving exactly the same food/nutrition-type etc. Worth bearing in mind.

http://laminitis.org/Vitex trial.html
 
Top