When did it become acceptable to allowdogs to run free across other peoples land?

JFTDWS

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This is the problem I have with people who don't understand that their dogs charging through the undergrowth or going for a swim can terrify the waterfowl population, destroy nests and kill young birds. And we're in a red squirrel area so ours are not vermin. I'm waiting for someone to complain one day that little Fido I has been attacked by an angry swan ...

Ets we don't have many rabbits but our hares are protected too, and because they run. In circles, a dog on the scent is quite likely to meet one coming the other way.
This.

I was watching some utter "twit" today who had obviously allowed one of her dogs off lead into the woods - which are fenced to keep ignorant dog walkers and their dogs out, and maintained for breeding pheasants etc. She was calling and whistling at the damn thing for a good 15 minutes (that I saw - she could have been there for hours for all I know), and clearly had absolutely no control over it whatsoever. The level of disruption to the wildlife in the woods is unacceptable, and that's why unreliable dogs should be kept on leads at all times.
 

kimberleigh

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I have no problem with dogs getting rabbits or grey squirrels or pigeons etc etc, but thats vastly different from a dog causing havoc running loose in a field of sheep - those sheep are someones likelihood, the wild animals are just that. I would always prevent my dogs chasing any protected species and stop them going after anything which would be deemed an illegal activity (fox/deer/badger etc) by keeping on a lead if they were likely to go after them. The greyhounds would chase anything that moved and kill it if they could catch it. The spaniel has zero interest in animals of any sort - but would be on a lead in wetland where birds were nesting because she can't keep out of water and her energetic running about may disturb them. The big dogs are always on lead except on my own or private land with permission from landowner.

Better to be safe than sorry as the old saying goes
 

BBP

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I had a real wake up call with my collie pup a while back, we were out and about everywhere on the long line and his recall response was excellent, so one day along a track I knew well, miles from anywhere, I thought I would try him off lead. We had a few nice recalls and then he was off like a heat seeking missile after a bird that flew overhead. As he streaked off into the distance I realised what a moron i was, to release a puppy with a strong chase instinct and insufficient impulse control. In my mind he had a right to burn off more energy and explore a bit, because ‘that’s what other dogs do’, but he and I had not put in enough work to earn the right to do that. I know now that had he encountered sheep (we don’t have any in this area), or a horse rider or a car, he would have caused chaos as he would have run straight at it with no impulse control, and could easily be killed or cause worse to the other party.

Since that day I will not and do not take him off his long lead unless I am absolutely confident of the situation (enclosed dog paddock or when with a group of local dog walkers as he never leaves their dogs) and I work hard on his obedience constantly when i have him. But I still worry about him snapping the lead clip or me fumbling it (I now clip him to a belt just in case) and getting loose.

I’m definitely on a learning curve with this dog, he is a real challenge, but actually the long line is a great solution. I’m learning to keep him engaged with me, to be fun for him, and so we do games and search work and down stays and send aways and all that sort of stuff each time we go walking which I hope will make me a better dog handler and him, one day, a more reliable dog.
 

only_me

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As an aside, if you do know someone who is having issues with dogs etc. On the land you should buy or borrow a couple of alpacas for a few weeks which will soon stop the dogs being loose in fields.
They are excellent guards, mine in the thick of it as soon as they spot something “abnormal” in their field lol. Plus guards are a lot cheaper than the breeding packs, which is just silly money in England!
 

Dobiegirl

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https://www.countryfile.com/go-outd...s-the-hidden-danger-that-dogs-pose-to-cattle/

This is another problem, people walking their dogs in fields think because its the countryside they dont have to pick up dog poo. One of our local farmers who has a public footpath running through his field had a whole lot of silage condemned because of the amount of dog poo in there. Despite writing in the Parish Magazine and notices on gates people still dont bother.
 

YorksG

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As an aside, if you do know someone who is having issues with dogs etc. On the land you should buy or borrow a couple of alpacas for a few weeks which will soon stop the dogs being loose in fields.
They are excellent guards, mine in the thick of it as soon as they spot something “abnormal” in their field lol. Plus guards are a lot cheaper than the breeding packs, which is just silly money in England!
Do they eat a lot of grass? I'm guessing that they would need shelter in bad weather and how do you get tem sheared? I'm quite keen on the idea because I spin our sheep fleece already :)
 

only_me

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Do they eat a lot of grass? I'm guessing that they would need shelter in bad weather and how do you get tem sheared? I'm quite keen on the idea because I spin our sheep fleece already :)

I don’t think they eat a huge pile, I’ve 3 on a 5 acre field with 2 donks and a big horse so haven’t really noticed though. I think the current recommend is no more than 5 per acre? They get hay in winter as well, and have a penchant for paddling pools in the summer lol.

They will need shelter, they get their teeth done couple times a year (our vet did it for the first time last year, weirdly the coal man does their teeth and nails), and they get clipped around may time. You could do them yourself as I think it’s just horse clippers they use, but usually there is a travelling clipper team who do it all, i just contact one of the big alpaca places and ask for us to be put down onto list!
Generally very easy to look after and they definitely have their own personalitys 😄
 

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planete

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A loose dog got into our local alpaca farm and mauled two of the animals, one so badly he died. So they do not really seem to be a match for a determined dog. They are more effective against foxes when kept with lambing sheep apparently.
 

only_me

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A loose dog got into our local alpaca farm and mauled two of the animals, one so badly he died. So they do not really seem to be a match for a determined dog. They are more effective against foxes when kept with lambing sheep apparently.
Some alpacas are good guards, some aren’t, the oldest in my 3 wouldn’t be half as good as the youngest, she’s a very determined lady!
Alpacas can come running at a dog and when they ran at my dog she felt very threatened and hid behind me, and she was literally just walking beside me as we crossed the field!

But they are best as deterrents and guards, but will defend anything they consider their herd and can attack quite well, can easily kill a dog as they stamp down on the animal with. Their front feet. However I’m not sure anything other than a gun could stop a dog in high adrenaline mauling session.
 

YorksG

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Some alpacas are good guards, some aren’t, the oldest in my 3 wouldn’t be half as good as the youngest, she’s a very determined lady!
Alpacas can come running at a dog and when they ran at my dog she felt very threatened and hid behind me, and she was literally just walking beside me as we crossed the field!

But they are best as deterrents and guards, but will defend anything they consider their herd and can attack quite well, can easily kill a dog as they stamp down on the animal with. Their front feet. However I’m not sure anything other than a gun could stop a dog in high adrenaline mauling session.
Yes thaat is what worried me about the dogs in the field, they were already in hunting mode, after rabbits and could so easily have turned their atttention to he sheep.
 
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