Where to go next, bit wise.

Bs_mum

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8 May 2019
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I have a friend who rides her Irish in a snaffle, but he’s big and strong, & last week when spooked he tanked off which has knocked her confidence. He’s green, and lacks confidence which isn’t beyond her means, but since having children, she’s not as confident as she thought she was.

She needs a stronger bit, there’s no doubt about. I rode him for the first time yesterday, he’s just in a loose ring lozenge snaffle which he holds rigid in his mouth, so there’s nothing there, if he decided to tank you’d have absolutely no hope in hell (which she found out last week) While he didn’t tank off with me, the whole way home he pulled like a steam train, I just gave him his head which confused him but she is too nervous to do so, and I can see why.

I think she should ride him in a Mullen or port Pelham. 2 reins, ride on the snaffle rein with the other rein there for just incase, mainly because I’d rather be able to pull a horse up in an instant then saw on its mouth for control.

I know she’s thinking about it too much, and that if she knew she could stop him if he tanked then their relationship would blossom, they do have a good bond, just this one thing holding them back. I’ve offered to ride him, reluctantly, as I feel she needs to continue riding him for them to grow together. This is only out hacking, schooling he goes fantastic in his snaffle and there’s no confidence issues whatsoever.
 

Pearlsasinger

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I can thoroughly recommend a PeeWee bit as a remedy for that very problem.

I had a young, green Clydesdale mare who was frightened (!) by some colts cantering along in the field next to the road where we were trotting. She was in a French link snaffle and she shot off, across a, fortunately quiet, road junction. I only stopped her by aiming her at a wall, if I'd missed, we'd have been down the steep track to the golf course, which I doubt would have gone down well.

So I splashed out on a PeeWee and it worked a treat, no more problems, ever and it only needs one rein, which on a green horse, I prefer. I later lent the bit to an eventer for her big green horse who was difficult to turn/stop x-country, it worked well for her too and she was able to go back to her usual bit after a while.
 

Bs_mum

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So I rode him in a Pelham today, while he was better, it’s not for him. He wasn’t forward like he normally is, he seemed really backwards & i’m not convinced that if you where to put pressure on it, he wouldn’t go bolt upright. Next bit I’m going to try is a universal gag, and see how that is.
I would love to try a bit consultant, but we are very rural, and the nearest one is 3 hours from us and will only travel in if there is a group of us, and at this time, no-one is in the market for a new bit locally so we’re waiting until she can come this way!
 

ycbm

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Bits are odd things, or is it the horses 😁? I tried a peewee on my hard pullng hunter and it made no impact on him at all.


I'd go straight fr a Pelham, but be prepared to experiment with peewee, gags, rollers, waterfords and combination bits that use nose pressure as well if that doesn't work.
.
 

Bs_mum

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8 May 2019
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Sounds like you had the curb chain too tight on the pelham. Try it again with a much looser curb and see how you get on
Curb definitely wasn’t too tight, I double checked.
I ride all of mine in a Pelham so I’m familiar with the fit, hence why it was my instant go too bit.
 

Zuzan

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6 March 2011
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I would look at working to develop more lateral bend in schooling .. it's very useful when hacking to ride with a laterally bent in opposite direction to the spook point / focus neck... it will also the encourage the horse to lower its neck..

Obviously learning how to ride with a laterally flexed neck is something for schooling sessions .. it's great way of teaching a horse about bend.. the correct term is fléchi droit pics here
and
 

GSD Woman

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9 December 2018
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So I Googled pee wee bit since I had never heard of them. Am I correct that it sort of like a straight bar, but curved instead, snaffle with a piece that acts like a curb strap?
 

Pearlsasinger

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It's a thin sweet iron mullen-mouthed bit with side-pieces which aid turning. If I remember rightly there are 3 different ways to attach the reins to it which alter the positioning of the side pieces, for different horses/needs. It does need a curb strap to keep it still in the mouth.

I used it on the most straightforward/mildest setting. I found that horses with big tongues and low pallets liked it. I used it with an ID after the Clydie just because I was struggling to find a bit that she liked and she went well in it, too.
 

Kaylum

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29 May 2010
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Have you had a look in his mouth to see how the bit fits. Which groove is it in. Is it catching on any of the teeth. What noseband are you using.

If possible take the noseband off and try in the school without it.
 

Griffin

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16 September 2012
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Why don't your get a horse bit fit consultant out?

They will match the right mpught peice to the horse as if the bit isn't right they do lean into it alot.
I totally agree. You can waste lots of money on different bits that don't work and possibly make things worse. Alternatively, you can get a bit consultant out for about £50 and within a couple of hours you will have the right answer and a happier horse. I have come to the conclusion that we pay experts to fit saddles and bits are just as important.

I used Horse Bit Fit (but there are others) and I now have a very happy mare who now works beautifully!
 
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