Why are yearling Shires shod?

NellRosk

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Went to an agricultural show on Saturday (Otley if anyone was there) and all the Shires there were shod, including 1 and 2 year olds. Why is this, does anyone know? I've tried googling it but can't see anything!
 

express_75

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Some yearling Sec Ds are shod
Dont like to see it personally but that's showing for you
 

amandap

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There's a thread on Phoenix horse forum about this and if I remember correctly, it isn't in the rules but seems a custom that hasn't been challenged.
 

amandap

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The thread may have been about Clydesdales rather than Shires.
 

Vodkagirly

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A friends shire cross was shoed at 2 as it feet were wearing away very fast, could it be a breed trait?
 

RutlandH2O

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Many exhibitors in the Shire fraternity think that if their yearling or two year old is not shod, they won't have a chance high up in the ribbons. In fact, this is precisely what happens in the ring. According to the guidelines for judging Shires, "Horses should not be penalised if they are unshod." But, they are. "All turnout entries must be shod," and they are. Also, "Horses with unclipped tails should not be penalised. The dock should be covered." In reality, unclipped tails are penalised, and the majority of docks are shaven and completely uncovered and exposed. Nearly all the veteran exhibitors and those coming up in the ranks routinely have their youngsters shod and their docks shaven and exposed. Full stop. It's almost a badge of honour to prepare their horses in that way. There are a few committed, but not big winning, exhibitors who plait up their Shires' tails exquisitely, making them short and compact, thus showing off the horses' hind end to best advantage without cutting the tail. There are some exhibitors who shave the dock but leave enough hair so that it is not exposed. That is the way it should be done. Practically all the approved judges in the Shire world are breeders/exhibitors themselves, thus perpetuating the shoeing of youngsters and shaving of docks.
 

FubsyMog

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Many exhibitors in the Shire fraternity think that if their yearling or two year old is not shod, they won't have a chance high up in the ribbons. In fact, this is precisely what happens in the ring. According to the guidelines for judging Shires, "Horses should not be penalised if they are unshod." But, they are. "All turnout entries must be shod," and they are. Also, "Horses with unclipped tails should not be penalised. The dock should be covered." In reality, unclipped tails are penalised, and the majority of docks are shaven and completely uncovered and exposed. Nearly all the veteran exhibitors and those coming up in the ranks routinely have their youngsters shod and their docks shaven and exposed. Full stop. It's almost a badge of honour to prepare their horses in that way. There are a few committed, but not big winning, exhibitors who plait up their Shires' tails exquisitely, making them short and compact, thus showing off the horses' hind end to best advantage without cutting the tail. There are some exhibitors who shave the dock but leave enough hair so that it is not exposed. That is the way it should be done. Practically all the approved judges in the Shire world are breeders/exhibitors themselves, thus perpetuating the shoeing of youngsters and shaving of docks.

Very interesting Rutland. I was at an show recently and noticed the yearling and 2 y.o. Clydes wearing shoes and wondered why. Have also noted the baldy tails on numerous occasions, as well as beautifully elaborately plaited and folded up ones. I am amazed that the baldy tails actually do better - I thought it looked like a lazy alternative to the plaiting, which I have seen done brilliantly with ribbons and decorations and, to my ,mind, draws better attention to good quarters.
 

RutlandH2O

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FubsyMog: To see more of the 'beautifully elaborately plaited and folded up tails,' there are quite a few Suffolk Punch and Percheron exhibitors who excel in producing their horses with such artistry. The shaving of docks is more to expose the massive, muscular hindquarters (bum) than an act of laziness, though.
 
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