Worried about horse's feet after being shod today

seabiscuit

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Woody's feet look tiny after shoeing today, plus he was very lame. I accept that they can be lame after shoeing, thats fine I guess, so I will wait a few days to see if that settles down, or it could be a nail prick. Tho he has never EVER been one to be lame after shoeing.
Am just worried about how small theyve suddenly become. My farrier was doing such a super job until now, and was very pleased, left him to it today and this evening he had 4 tiny feet
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There literally seems to just be one , maybe one and a half inch of foot there from the ground to the coronet band, whearas before he had a decent two inches of foot there.

I know that the farrier was working on bringing his toes back and heels up -which I loved when he first started shoeing my horse- was just so delighted to have finally found a farrier that cuts of plenty of toe- but it now seems that things have become a little extreme in the fact that the feet are now suddenly looking so small and the heel seems to have, in fact, decreased?

They are just too small for his body now, TBH.

Obv Im not a farrier so cannot judge. Am very good at criticising farriers for leaving the toes far too long and heels too collapsed, as that is what so many of them make the mistake of doing, but I know nothing about this other extreme? Thoughts?

ETS; Have got pictures on my phone, in fact am really worried now just looking at them again- cant download them onto here but if there are any feet experts out there that I could text them to, then would be v. gratefull!
 

ihatework

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If he is lame then get your farrier back up to see him, he needs to see the impact of his shoeing. I'm not going to slate the farrier just yet as sometimes there is a fine balance, and he may have just made a mistake and got a bit happy with the trimming. Once farrier has seen him then shovel down the bute.

How lame is he presenting? shuffly on both or noticeably lame on one more than the other?

I have had 6 years of of a horse that would go lame after shoeing at the drop of a hat, for a variety of farriers. The one thing that made the biggest difference was 1 x bute 1hr before shoeing and then 1 x bute in evening feed combined with a very gentle sear of the shoe of preferably cold shod.

As Woody hasn't been lame before then its quite likely that just a bit too much was taken off.
 

seabiscuit

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Thank you for your thoughts B&J ! The farrier says he will come back again if he's not sound again by tomorrow afternoon. He looks wrong in all four legs- very shuffly, and very lame in every leg when he does the slightest turn. Each foot is warm and pulsating.

Good tip on the bute thank you- but do hope that this wont be needing this for every shoeing now
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but will prob give some one hour before shoeing for the next couple of shoeings until things are back to normal.
 

ihatework

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If each foot is warm and with a pulse then to be on the safe side I'd have him in on a deepish bed for 24h with soaked hay. Although unlikely to be lammi it's not unheard of.
 

blackcob

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[ QUOTE ]
If each foot is warm and with a pulse then to be on the safe side I'd have him in on a deepish bed for 24h with soaked hay. Although unlikely to be lammi it's not unheard of.

[/ QUOTE ]

Echo this - my horse had concussive laminitis not long before christmas when the farrier took a little too much off the toes. She was presenting with all the symptoms of laminitis within the hour and we had to get out the emergency vet as she was sweating and in obvious pain.
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Like you I was glad to have found a farrier who wasn't scared to cut back the toe, as our previous farrier left them very long to the point of stumbling, but this time he took just a shade too much off. It is a very fine line to tread sometimes.

If he's lame tomorrow morning I'd get the vet out immediately and treat as for laminitis.
 

seabiscuit

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Really? He really does not have a blade of grass in his field! Can a farrier induce lammi through shoeing in this way?
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seabiscuit

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[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
If each foot is warm and with a pulse then to be on the safe side I'd have him in on a deepish bed for 24h with soaked hay. Although unlikely to be lammi it's not unheard of.

[/ QUOTE ]

Echo this - my horse had concussive laminitis not long before christmas when the farrier took a little too much off the toes. She was presenting with all the symptoms of laminitis within the hour and we had to get out the emergency vet as she was sweating and in obvious pain.
frown.gif


Like you I was glad to have found a farrier who wasn't scared to cut back the toe, as our previous farrier left them very long to the point of stumbling, but this time he took just a shade too much off. It is a very fine line to tread sometimes.

If he's lame tomorrow morning I'd get the vet out immediately and treat as for laminitis.

[/ QUOTE ]

Oh no !!
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this does sound so similar. Argh, why is it so difficult for these farriers to get it right!
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Will go and have a look at him now. Is your horse OK now? How long did it take him to recover? Did you stick with the same farrier?
 

TheFarrier

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Stress can induce laminitis yes

It doesnt sound good though and does sound like he may have taken too much off which can cause lameness. Or it could be sole pressure which will alleviate wthin a day or two.

If you would like me to have a look at the pics then pm me and ill give you my mobile number.

Best bet though is farrier coming back which is what he is doing so that will let you know the cause as the pain will go away if its sole pressure and the shoes are taken off and refitted or if it was a nail prick he can find the offending nail etc. or if it is stressed induced lami
 

kit279

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Oh no, poor you and poor Woody
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I know that it's better if they can shorten the toe in theory but in my experience, if the farriers do it too quickly, it absolutely cripples the horse. I'll PM you about farriers.
 

UncleJr

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Oh no!! Poor Woody!!
Please send me pictures! I'll show them to a v good farrier, and to a vet.
[ QUOTE ]
I accept that they can be lame after shoeing, thats fine I guess

[/ QUOTE ] I don't accept it, and it's not fine imho
[ QUOTE ]
...or it could be a nail prick

[/ QUOTE ] Yes, v possible, or it could be a 'tight' shoe as well. It happened to me last month (with another farrier).
 

Thistle

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How is Woody today?

Def treat as lami, they don't need grass to get it, can be shock or stress induced. If you think it's lami get the vet too, at least if you get the vet you may have some comeback on the farrier if he has caused lasting damage.

I'm noy usualy a 'claim' person but if the lameness is caused by the farrier they have insurance for a reason.

Really hope it's nothing serious.
 

BBs

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Echo Thistle, have known horses contract lami via an injection.
How is Woody today?
Poor boy, keep us posted (((hug))) for you too.
x
 
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