Wwyd advice on euthanasia

honetpot

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I can understand your reasoning, but you are worrying about something that might not happen. If you can afford grass livery where he can be turned out with one, he may settle, just like that. The amount of times I have bought a pony in that has been supposedly unsettled a problem, hate living out ect and you turn them out with an older pony and they just accept it like they have lived together all their lives. Its almost a relief for them like they have moved schools and got a clean slate.
What ever you decide you have tried your best, other people may say you should do this or that but only you know how you are coping and he will nothing about it.
 

hopscotch bandit

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There is no reason to think a yard move would be stressful for him, but if you are sure that he would be worried there are many things you can do to counteract any anxiety at this time including Zyklene which is based on the mares milk protein casein which is proven to work in stressful situation, its very effective.

This is off the website:
Zylkene Equine is a natural product that has been developed to help horses and ponies overcome difficult or stressful situations such as prolonged confinement, a new environment, new people or new horses, weaning, breaking, travelling, vet, farrier or dentist visits.

Usage: Administer to horses facing daily stress or before any predictably stressful situations. Zylkene Equine promotes rapid and smooth adaption to changing situations.

Directions for use: Zylkene Equine is a powder that should be mixed with a small amount of food and given daily.

Horses up to 500kg: 1-2 sachet daily
Horses over 500kg: 2-4 sachets daily

Period of use: 2-4 weeks. You are recommended to consult your vet before extending the period of use.

Composition: each 4g sachet contains Maltodextrin & Casein.

No side effects have been associated with the use of this product. .
 

Aimeetess

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24 April 2013
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Have you looked at getting a loan to pay if he needed the second op? I recently had to get a loan and managed to get a very low APR, only 5% I believe which isn't bad at all. Apologies if its been considered.

Only you know what to do. My gelding is not insured, we have a very strong bond and I've had him 5 years too and hes 10. He has just had his neck medicated as he has severe arthritis pushing on his spinal cord, he just has a funny canter and was not happy being ridden. Its already cost me £1400 in my savings. Hopefully he will only need it medicated yearly which is £350 a time but sometimes it wears off within 3 months and it needs to be regular, then it will stop working and the only option is retire or PTS so if it comes to that I have no idea what i'd do as its expensive these days to even have a horse at grass livery around me.

Can you get a second opinion? I'd ask around, maybe pop a few emails about with x-rays. If i knew the operation would work i'd definitely push for it, as i'm soft.. but if they aren't certain i'd be feeling the same way as you mind neck arthritis will only get worse and there is no op for it. It could be worth turning him away, then you know you've tried everything and it would settle your mind a bit.
 

LaurenBay

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I would turn him away if you can. He may come right on his own or he may not and you will then have to make the hard decision to PTS. I'd speak with your vet over both options, I'd only consider turning away if he were pain free enough to be turned away.

If he is the stressy type then I'd try to find a field or retired Horses where no Horses leave, rather then grass livery. The constant bringing in/tuning back out of other Horses which are coming in to be ridden could upset him.
 

equi

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It’s not really a good decision for him, if you want to end his life to avoid paying any more money then fair enough but don’t make out it’s for him if you aren’t prepared to try any other options
I think thats very unreasonable.

OP if you can try him on a grass livery do, for a few weeks. If it doesn't work PTS knowing you tried what you could within your survivable budget. Many would not have done the first op at all, so you can't think you didn't try. Also i really would not get a loan, for something that really should have been fixed first time round. I don't think horses are worth getting yourself into thousands of pounds worth of debt..sorry if im harsh.
 

bonny

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I think thats very unreasonable.

OP if you can try him on a grass livery do, for a few weeks. If it doesn't work PTS knowing you tried what you could within your survivable budget. Many would not have done the first op at all, so you can't think you didn't try. Also i really would not get a loan, for something that really should have been fixed first time round. I don't think horses are worth getting yourself into thousands of pounds worth of debt..sorry if im harsh.
Lots of people have suggested this, I did in the first answer to the OPs question.
 

bonny

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Your further posts to the OP suggesting she only cares about money were unreasonable. You have a bit of a problem with tact.
I have no idea what she cares about, we can only go on what is posted, there is no point in lots of answers saying turn him out if this isn’t possible for whatever reason.
 

amymay

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My two options are to put him out in a field with my other pony who is also lame at the moment but should recover soon, or have him pts.
If I was to put him in a field there is a chance that he will get upset as he doesn’t really enjoy being out 24/7 however we cannot afford to keep him stabled.
So you do have the option of turning him out......

This is what I'd do, and reassess in the summer.
 

sportsmansB

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9 February 2009
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Lots and lots of horses don't enjoy being out 24/7 in their usual environment, including my own, he thinks he has been forgotten about at dinner time and runs about like a lunatic, trying to remind us about him. However when he goes 'away' on his proper holidays with another horse, checked over the fence once a day, he is absolutely fine.
I know you don't want to make his life more miserable, and there is a risk he won't adjust, but if the other option is PTS then surely its worth a go?
 
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OP so sorry you're in this position.

I've read a few comments on here and there are some very good suggestions: ultimately the decision has to be yours, and naturally you want to give your boy every possible chance without having to make a hasty decision.

My instinct, for now, would be to "wait and see" - if you can, and just chuck him out and see what happens come the summer. Yes he's used to being stabled, and that's (obviously) his routine, but he WILL get used to it.

However, my understanding is that "resting turnout" might prove stressy for him; additionally in your current yard situation you'd find it hard to find a field that would be quiet, with quiet horses around him, yes?? Ideally you need a set-up with a couple of oldies who won't be wanting to hoon around and risk him making himself worse.

Someone has suggested moving him to a quieter yard: yes this MAY be a solution, but as you/someone else has said, this just might be too stressful for him. But then, horses DO cope with this........

Conversely (playing devils advocate here) I would say is if you are up against it financially, there's absolutely no shame in making the decision to PTS for economic reasons; or simply because the alternative, i.e. keeping the animal alive, is going to be stressful and traumatic for them as it might involve a move which would be stressy (and more expense for you). Whatever, you know your pony, and you know the limitations of your own purse.

If you WERE going to turn-away and wait-and-see, it might be worth seeing if there is anyone in a quiet situation with maybe a field spare, and see if they could help........ just a thought.

Soooh sorry you're in this awful position.
 

Pearlsasinger

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OP, if you wanted to turn him out 24/7 and don't want him to run around when the others come in, would it be possible at first to bring him into a stable for a feed and maybe some hay for an hour or so and then turn him back out, so that his routine isn't so very different at first. Often it isn't the being out overnight that they object to (so long as they have company) but seeing the others leave them, especially if they associate coming in with being fed.
 

Gloi

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OP, if you wanted to turn him out 24/7 and don't want him to run around when the others come in, would it be possible at first to bring him into a stable for a feed and maybe some hay for an hour or so and then turn him back out, so that his routine isn't so very different at first. Often it isn't the being out overnight that they object to (so long as they have company) but seeing the others leave them, especially if they associate coming in with being fed.
This is a good idea because it's very often that the only reason they don't want to stop out is that they are used to coming in for food. If you can wean them off the idea that the stable = food then it is a lot easier.
 
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