antis will have a field day.....

dunkley

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I hunted with the Brays several years ago, and even then, at one point we were dodging washing lines in the outer suburbs :( Very sad, poor little dog, and the family must be devastated, as, I should think, are the hunt staff.
 

Tiddlypom

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Hounds killed a sheep round here a few years ago. I heard this recently second hand but from someone who hunts regularly with that pack.

I believe that all the hounds that were out that day were shot on their return to the kennels.

The farmer was a pro hunt chap and accepted an apology and compensation for the loss of the sheep. I doubt that it made the press, I certainly hadn't heard of the incident (I don't hunt).

I very much doubt that hounds would savage a child but what would happen if a child tried to pick up a pet that was being savaged?
 

ester

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How do the hunt go on with regards to crossing land? For example if they have permission to cross one farmers fields but not another which is adjoining how does that work?
They stop hounds, IME by using the field to create a barrier of horses to stop hounds following a trail in the direction they don't want them to go (if for instance they found a real trail not the one they are suppose to be following).
 

Starbucks

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It was on the Sheffield Forum, last week, I thought what a horrible thing to happen but didnt write on here about it, but when I heard it had happened again this time to a dog I just had to join this discussion. I do not wish all dogs to be put down-thats like saying, if one person commits murder then all of us should be killed (just a silly comparison!) To Starbucks- the huntsman of this hunt was very obviously out of control of his hounds, I know this is not the case with most hunts, but this sort of thing does give you ALL a very bad name and doesnt help your cause at all. In my opinion, it is only a matter of time before this happens to a child in the wrong place at the wrong time in a similar situation and while on one hand god forbid it, on the other it would probably ban hunting with hounds in this country for good. You say different dogs are bred to kill different animals, then why do hounds go for cats and other dogs in this case (as they did pre-ban)?
So basically, you'd quite like hounds to kill a kid so they would bad hunting?? Nice! :-/

Cats and small dogs aren't a million miles away from a fox. a lot closer than a child anyway! My little terrier is quite keen with other dogs and mega keen with small furry animals but no way would he ever harm a person!! It just doesn't work like that. Do you have dogs yourself?

I'm getting irritated by the post I hate it when people try and make out hounds are evil it makes me sad. :(
 

marianne1981

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Hounds are not evil! I never once said that. How would you feel if the hounds tore your terrier to pieces though-if your dog had been there that day it is likely to have happened! And of course I'd not "quite like" hounds to kill a child. What I meant was, if, and in my opinion "when" a child gets caught in the fray of something like this, I would not like to think of the consequences, and as for would I like to see all hounds shot... as someone else said, they all get shot pretty young anyway so whats your point? I would respect pro's more if they would accept that what has happened is wrong, think about why it happened and what could be learnt from it. And if it happens once a formal warning from the MFHA, again and be struck off. That is how it should work, and how it would work in most other organisations. And for your information, I do not currently own a dog, but in the past have owned ex racing rescue greyhounds.
 

Starbucks

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do you think your greyhounds might have killed a child? They are bread to hunt small animals in the same way but I doubt anyone would say that an ex-racing greyhound might just accidently munch a small child to death. of course they wouldn't! Just like a fox hound wouldn't. They might, however, eat a small dog.

Like I said I would be furious if hounds came into my garden and killed my dog! Of course it is wrong I think that goes without saying. What I am saying is this one incident shouldn't condemn all hunts, all hounds. I hunt with a top pack with an extremely professional huntsman with very obedient hounds. Why should our hounds / hunt suffer just because another hunt had a balls up? I would imagine many, many more small dogs have met their maker from the jaws of a greyhound than a foxhound. Should we just shoot all greyhounds too???

Of course not!!

TBH though I don't think it would happen to my little terrier, he's a bold as brass and I think he'd just join in and they wouldn't notice. I hate it when people are all precious with their dogs, keep them on the lead, go down the "my poor dog keeps getting attacked" route! Just let them get on with it and they learn to socialise.

not saying this was the case in this situation.
 

marianne1981

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If the greyhounds I had were in a large pack (which doesnt happen), out of control, however nice they were individually, no I would not like my young boys to be there with a little dog/cat/alpaca etc. Not because I didnt trust that one dog alone, but because I would not like to guess what MAY happen in a pack instinct and in the fray. These hounds were a danger, and whilst you may be able to "hunt with a top pack" as you say, these other packs are still part of your "organisation" and are dragging your cause down even lower than it already is.
 

Countryman

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Hounds are not evil! I never once said that. How would you feel if the hounds tore your terrier to pieces though-if your dog had been there that day it is likely to have happened!
Marianne- you're showing yourself up now. What utter rubbish you suggest - that if her terrier was present it is likely it would have been killed!There are 42,000 hunting days in the UK and Ireland every year, and on each day hounds from each pack come into contact with dozens of dogs, and just the odd incident happens each year or so. Therefore the chance is just one in several hundred thousand that a terrier at the scene of a hunt would be killed - highly unlikely!
 

BethanT

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As sad as this incident is I dont think anyone could sit here and say it is entirely the hounds fault. Dogs attack other dogs and cats, even killing them at times. Does that mean all dogs should be shot? No, because once in a while you will get an animal with a few crossed wires.

I am sure the hunt dealt with it appropriately, as someone has previously said, the two hounds involved where disposed of.
 

KidnapMoss

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12 July 2010
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How do the hunt go on with regards to crossing land? For example if they have permission to cross one farmers fields but not another which is adjoining how does that work?
Oh it doesn't stop them round here :(

We had hounds rioting round our pony paddocks on Saturday, i mean, right in them, not bordering them, when we were out but luckily a neighbour and friend sorted our 4 stressed horses who were all turned out. I am still livid about it and have let the hunt know via email. Although we farm, our paddocks are directly behind our house, and COMPLETLY separate to the farm. I can only assume they were illegally hunting since we have an old dog fox who happily wanders through the ponies field at dusk :( if they had killed our puppy I would have been devastated and would probably use social media as well.
 

Tiddlypom

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How do the hunt go on with regards to crossing land? For example if they have permission to cross one farmers fields but not another which is adjoining how does that work?
Funny that you should ask this. Of course, sometimes even very pro hunt farmers ask that the hunt avoid certain fields at certain times, and a clued up mastership will respect that.

Last year, a local hunt ignored that request on a particular farmers land and trespassed onto areas that they were specifically asked to avoid. The farmer came out and started having a bit of a slanging match with the hunt followers whilst his wife, a local equine vet, hid in a stable so that none of the field (and potentially clients) noticed her! (I heard this tale from one of her colleagues).

Many hunts are very well run and would never dream of venturing where they are not welcomed. Unfortunately, there are a few who are less respectful, and they do hunting a great disservice.
 

marianne1981

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Countryman I had seen that this incident was not the first time this happened with this hunt- I am just saying, could you really, truly say that you would be entirely comfortable with having your own small dogs around this particular hunt given it's track record?
 

Countryman

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Drafting a hound means sending it to another pack. For instance, pre ban, if a pack of foxhounds found one hound was flawed in that he would only hunt red deer, never foxes, he could be drafted to a staghound pack. Likewise, a hound from Surrey whose only fault was it loved to riot on muntjac deer, could be drafted to a pack in Yorkshire where they have no muntjac.
 

unbalanced

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Drafting a hound means sending it to another pack. For instance, pre ban, if a pack of foxhounds found one hound was flawed in that he would only hunt red deer, never foxes, he could be drafted to a staghound pack. Likewise, a hound from Surrey whose only fault was it loved to riot on muntjac deer, could be drafted to a pack in Yorkshire where they have no muntjac.
Thank you.
 
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Hunts have very little control over the dogs
I didn't really want to get involved but I took umbrage with this statement - I hunt regularly with my local pack and the reality couldn't be further from your comment. We cross a lot of farmland and open hill grazed by hill sheep; our hounds not only come to the call of the horn and/or the huntsman, they also come to the call of any number of the ridden followers (we are a small hunt and a lot of us know the hounds by name). Obedience is the most important lesson the hounds must learn.

As an example yesterday, as we rode through the town where the meet was held we came across two small dogs tied to a post while their owner was in the shop. Only one hound hung back for a sniff, and once the name was called the hound carried on along with the rest.

If a hound kills a sheep, or in this instance another dog, it should be shot. But it's not a common occurrence like some people like to assume. Hounds are placid dogs, they are great with children and the hounds I have puppy-walked have always been great with other dogs (my current puppy lives with our sheepdog).
 

Crugeran Celt

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I am surprised some say how the dogs are difficult to control as I am always impressed how obedient the hounds are. I have never hunted, not because I am anti hunting I am just not brave enough to do it. I do however frequently go to see the hunt and the dogs seem to be well under control at all times.
 

Girlracer

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How absolutely tragic, incredibly sad.

But as most have said an incredibly rare occurrence. Those of you saying that the hounds are regularly 'out of control' have clearly never had anything to do with hunting, as that is as far from the truth as possible. In this instance of course the select few involved were, and that's why they were (presumably) destroyed following the incident. It is extremely rare, and hounds generally are extremely friendly and good with domestic dogs, children, horses etc etc.
 

Tern

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She has also attacked a small dog.
That's not something to be proud of.

Well i'm no where near Anti-Hunt, I'm going hunting in 2014 :D Although this is unacceptable the hound(s) will have been put to sleep, All saying they are not under control I can assure you that at my hunt if the master calls Tuesday - Tuesday will come same with Willow, and Sundae. Any hound will come to call of the horn and name - If it doesn't then it should not be out hunting on that day.
 
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