Autumn Staghunting

combat_claire

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Baily's agrees with me that 1984-2006 makes it his 27th season as huntsman...

Our hounds like every pack does extensive roadwork and and off-road work over the summer to ensure that their feet are as tough as they can be. However in a severe frost, I'm not talking the piddling little ones that we tend to get down here - but the severe freeze that we have had last season when the ground was like iron there was no point getting them out on that because the impact on their feet, unlike treading on a bramble thicket for part of the day would have been sustained for most of the hunting morning. Hounds will be sore enough after a regular day in the field without exacerbating it further.

At least you acknowledge that there are few meets down here where we can reasonably expect our hunt staff to keep control on foot.
 

severnmiles

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Oh dear, Oh dear, Oh dear!

Come and say that to them, I doubt you've even been within 10 miles of kennels so how would you know?

Presumtion is a dangerous thing.
 

severnmiles

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I guess thats each to their own. Would you agree that the road is extremely hard? Some p2p trainers would frown upon trotting after road work, others would say if the foundations of road work at walk are laid correctly and the home work is done trotting on the roads is an essential part to fittening a pointer.

Its difference of opinions. I trust our ex huntsman's judgement, we'll see what our current HM makes of the frost.
 

Karla

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25 July 2006
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My understanding is that a severe frost not only makes the ground hard but potentially very sharp in places - thus Liam's reference to "shards" of ice which can end a hound's career. You'd be quite happy to risk this. I'm relieved that there are more responsible hunters around.
 

severnmiles

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Shards of ice don't compare with brambles, black thorn, slate, barbed wire e.t.c then?

Everytime I run my pointer I will be risking his and perhaps his jockeys life, but does that make me care any less for him? Of course not, I'd be truly gutted if anything happened but I am aware of the risks.
 

Karla

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25 July 2006
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To be honest, my tasty Welsh cake, I no longer care. I'm completely bored of the subject. They're "your" hounds, so kill them off if you want to.

I've FINALLY FINALLY finished the work I've been doing on the pc ALL DAY. I'm outa here!
 

wurzel

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24 November 2005
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Robbers Bridge, Exmore Forest
"You just don't get it. "

Probably not.

"It's possible to rush around to lots of places but not really see anything because you're so blinkered."

Fascinating!

What is your point?
What has this got to do with hunting?
You don't know what I know and I don't know what you know.
Would the fact that I am married to a "person other than british" or have lived with the Maya or fished with the villagers of the Mussandam have anything to do with hunting?

We can test each other about cultures of the world if you like.

But to what end?

You may not admit it but it is you who appears uptight.

I farm and I hunt. I am happy.

You want to stop that and you are failing.

I presume that grates.
 

soggy

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5 December 2005
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Whoops can't add up *blushes* does mathematical dyslexia exist? If so I think I might have it..sorry.
It certainly does and it goes by the name of Dyscalculia. It is estimated to affect 1 in 20 children and adults to some degree.
 

soggy

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5 December 2005
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Severn

Deadly serious! And no sarcasm what so ever.

Having battled with Dyslexia all my life, I have some sympathy with those affected.

Like dyslexia you can be affected to varying degrees, fortunately now teachers are aware of the conditions and are trained in how to spot those affected at an early age, and then provide alternative teaching methods that meet their specific needs.
 

Karla

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Weirdly, when I added it up it came to 26! There can only be one explanation for this, Wrighty: we've got the same type of brain. Worried?
 

Karla

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I formally withdraw all my nasty comments about you. I now realise you're a relaxed, light-hearted fellow with a great sense of humour and achingly receptive to new ideas and opinions. Others abide our question. Thou art free!
 

combat_claire

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Cambridgeshire
Not at all...it obviously shows that we are too busy dealing with the more serious aspects of the hunting debate to worry about a few extra seasons on the career of an eminent huntsman.

More worryingly still a certain hunt master got the same number..we're all in this together!

I wonder if I can bluff my way out of this and claim I added on his years as first whip to the Fitzwilliam....*whistles innocently*
 

Fairynuff

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31 March 2004
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italy
TF, seeing as I was born and bred in a country where stag hunting is unknown, would you pleas enlighten me as to what happens, how long and the end of the stag or hind. Not being funny in any way, I promise. M. :)
 

wurzel

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24 November 2005
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695
Location
Robbers Bridge, Exmore Forest
Sure, as you have asked politely.

A stag is located by members of the Stag hounds. The Stag selected is generally an older animal or one in poorer condition than the others. The people who do this are called Harbourers.

The most experienced hounds are sent in to isolate and flush out the chosen Stag. These are called Tufters.

Then the hunt begins. How long? Not surprisingly it varies.

I would say an average of 12 miles and 3 hours.

When the Stag is exhausted it turns to face the hounds that have been pursuing it. It stands at bay.

The huntsman then shoots it in the head at very close range.

The deer is then cleaned and butchered.


Basic outline Mairi, if you need clarification I will be glad to help.

Please remember that due to the hunting act 2004 the deer can now only be hunted by two hounds at a time and must be shot as soon as it is possible to get a clean shot.

No Minimi's or Gimpys allowed !!
 

AlanE

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7 January 2004
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102
Karla, there's far more to life than letting your fanaticism show through by referring to hunting as 'abusing animals for pleasure'. Do you REALLY believe that is the case, or are you unable to suppress your innate prejudice?
 

Karla

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25 July 2006
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Tom himself has said stag hunting is cruel, yet he loves it. I think that's a pretty good definition of "abusing animals for pleasure".
 

Karla

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25 July 2006
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117
Really?

It's a great shame I'm not using my normal pc because I've got some photos there of some really funny-looking Blacknose sheep.
 
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