Do you think equines are more ruined these days by novice owners etc?

TicTac

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yes I do and here's a recent example. A lady at my yard is selling her 13.2 welsh pony who in actual fact is a good little mare but not a first pony as she is forward going and bouncy with the typical flashy welsh movement.

She had a family come to try the pony last week. 2 girls. One aged 11 and one aged 8.
( the 8 year old was extremely petite ) They had been told that the pony hadn't been ridden much prior to their visit due to the cold weather and frozen manege but they didn't want to wait few days more.

The older daughter got on first and it was obvious she couldn't ride well. ( I was poo picking my paddock at the time) Next thing she get off and puts her younger sister on who is still at the lead rein stage. The small girl is led round at a walk for a couple of circuits and then goes into trot by which point it was obvious that this child had no balance either. Then the pony is put into canter with big sister running along side. All of a sudden the pony come around the top of the manege, spooks and started bucking, small child has no hope of staying on and flies out the side door breaking her arm as she falls. Child screams, mother shouts at child to stop screaming and get back on!

The family come back a few days later with small child's arm in plaster and say they will buy the pony!!
 

indie999

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16 January 2009
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yes I do and here's a recent example. A lady at my yard is selling her 13.2 welsh pony who in actual fact is a good little mare but not a first pony as she is forward going and bouncy with the typical flashy welsh movement.

She had a family come to try the pony last week. 2 girls. One aged 11 and one aged 8.
( the 8 year old was extremely petite ) They had been told that the pony hadn't been ridden much prior to their visit due to the cold weather and frozen manege but they didn't want to wait few days more.

The older daughter got on first and it was obvious she couldn't ride well. ( I was poo picking my paddock at the time) Next thing she get off and puts her younger sister on who is still at the lead rein stage. The small girl is led round at a walk for a couple of circuits and then goes into trot by which point it was obvious that this child had no balance either. Then the pony is put into canter with big sister running along side. All of a sudden the pony come around the top of the manege, spooks and started bucking, small child has no hope of staying on and flies out the side door breaking her arm as she falls. Child screams, mother shouts at child to stop screaming and get back on!

The family come back a few days later with small child's arm in plaster and say they will buy the pony!!
Forget RSPCA sounds more a case for NSPCC...blimey I thought I had a hard mother! Poor kid.........!
 
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bushbaby28

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25 August 2008
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Could it be due to the education given by riding schools? I mean back in the day the 'pony club way' would have been enforced and BHS exams encouraged before you brought your own horse. I think riding schools with true knowledgable and trained staff are becoming rare, and kids aren't as concerned with those clear ground rules.

I also think its the responsibility of the seller to make sure the potential buyer is truely suitable - which is this climate is hard as many people need to sell as quick as possible for personal and economic reasons.

OR maybe you are always going to get your numpties who don't consider the amount of work involved and try to find quick fixes which they read in a book somewhere.....

Interesting debate though!!!
 

Elsbells

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21 April 2010
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Staffordshire
I don't just think its novices as such just poor understanding or poor husbandry!! As I've owned 2 horses that have been ruined by experienced owners sadly!!
No wasted words here and you've hit the nail on the head.

I would call myself a novice, but if I hadn't of bought my burnt out nutty mare and used my novicy common sense to bring her back, god only knows where she would of ended up!

Experience does not mean you know it all and I'm shocked at the rubbish I have read on here tonight!!
 

RainbowDash

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3 February 2012
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Nottingham
I'm a novice, my lads the first pony i've ever owned, he was underweight when I brought him (thanks to his previous owner - 14 yo who mistreated him through ignorance), he's scared of a lot of things, puddles, plastic bags, noise depends really on the day and his current mood (sold as bombproof) - yes I fell for his (on ground) temperament and beautiful face :eek::

I have read up on horse care since I was 10 and know when I need help.

I took my boyo away from where he was was living - I don't know enough about horse care (stable duties yes, feeding, medication no) to help him so I brought him up to my local riding school (on full livery) who are helping me bring his weight up gradually, we're working on getting over the puddle monster, soon going to tackle the other problems.

Granted I wasn't raised with 'horse sense' but i'm doing my best to learn it to give my little lad the best life he can have from now on in is forever home :D

P.S.

He loves his new home and has lots of gelding buddies - so proud of him he's 14/15 yo and making good progress. I took a risk with him but he's such a super star...:D
 

RainbowDash

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3 February 2012
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Nottingham
I would also like to comment about riding schools. The schools I have come across only really train to ride (around a school or hacking) not to care for unless it's a special 'own a pony' day - which I suppose makes good business sense.?

But, why would anyone assume they know how to care for any animal? Dog, cat, bird, fish or horse without reading up on it or taking advice from a professional?
 
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