Drama on the roads.

Caol Ila

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Yes we have a car like this. But I’m still not sure why he couldn’t take his foot off the break a few seconds later when we were clear. But no harm done I guess but maybe he will know for next time.
Because people are oblivious. Most will be so desensitized to the stop-start that they won't know it's happening anymore and won't think about it. The rest might have some awareness, but won't realize that the sudden noise of an engine starting could spook a horse.
 

Peglo

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Because people are oblivious. Most will be so desensitized to the stop-start that they won't know it's happening anymore and won't think about it. The rest might have some awareness, but won't realize that the sudden noise of an engine starting could spook a horse.
Alrighty then. Hopefully spooking my horse won’t stop him from being oblivious to other road users safety. That would be a shame if he had to consider his actions whilst driving.
 

Rowreach

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Alrighty then. Hopefully spooking my horse won’t stop him from being oblivious to other road users safety. That would be a shame if he had to consider his actions whilst driving.
Maybe he will have realised. He was considerate enough to stop for you in the first place after all …
 

Peglo

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Maybe he will have realised. He was considerate enough to stop for you in the first place after all …
yes I said that I hoped he would realise for next time in a post above. And no harm was done. But apparently I still shouldn’t be a bit miffed because he might be oblivious to his driving.

ETA we were on a B road so he’d have to stop at the top or he wouldn’t get passed. Only adding because I agreed in my head that it was good of him to wait and then thought about it and if I was in my car he would have to stop to give way but wouldn’t think he was good to stop and wait but did when on my horse. This is getting off topic but even as a horse rider I subconsciously see vehicles as priority on the road. I never think I have priority when I meet other riders/cyclists when I’m in my car however.
 
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j1ffy

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But apparently I still shouldn’t be a bit miffed because he might be oblivious to his driving.
That's not how I read CI's post at all - I think she was just commenting that many drivers don't think about the stop-start rather than suggesting you should feel one way or another about it. It's annoying to all horse riders, last month a horse at my yard was being led from another one and kicked off a BMW's wing mirror and damaged the driver's door when the engine started as they walked past! The rider had insurance and the horse was fine, as was the driver (if a little shaken).
 

Errin Paddywack

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There are two ancient trees near me that cars have driven into in the last few weeks in separate incidents. They are not on bends, no other vehicles were involved and I can't remember this ever happening before. Neither of the drivers were hurt and neither of them thought it was their fault although their cars were totalled. . .
I wonder whose fault they thought it was. Perhaps the trees jumped out in front of them.
 

Peglo

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@Jiffy fair enough. I don’t actually know if the vehicle was one that switches off as after I waved and passed I was looking ahead for traffic at the cross roads we were at. The other vehicles that’s done it were ignition started, one guy was my uncle so know he started up his pickup as we passed. But sorry @Caol Ila for being on the defensive if I got the wrong angle. I didn’t think the man meant to scare my horse at all.
 

oldie48

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We had about 15 metres of hedge taken out in the winter, the car then aqua planed on the wet grass for another 20 metres and buried itself in a thick hedge and ditch. Car was a complete write off. This was on a straight stretch of lane which is just wide enough for two small cars to pass each other. It happened again a few weeks ago just down the lane, again on a straight bit of lane. So many drivers just don't seem to know how to drive safely on narrow country lanes. I nearly got taken out on our back lane which is single track with several bends, I can hear cars coming and know every place I can squeeze into if necessary, what I can't control is the driver who is going too fast, slams the brakes on when he sees me parked up out of the way and then loses control of the car because the lane is wet and muddy. When I politely suggested she was going too fast I was told there was no speed limit! If I hadn't been listening for traffic and acted quickly she would have hit me.
 
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I very nearly got taken out by a Tesco delivery truck, have a very bad blind generate drivers fly round, I can hear them dominance make sure I tuck my boy right in, it's the look of complete surprise on their faces as the suddenly pay attention, if I was another vehicle would have been a head on collision. I go out with a go pro and hi vized up, again very lucky my boy is pretty bombproof though crisp packets are a hazard.
 

Caol Ila

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That's not how I read CI's post at all - I think she was just commenting that many drivers don't think about the stop-start rather than suggesting you should feel one way or another about it. It's annoying to all horse riders, last month a horse at my yard was being led from another one and kicked off a BMW's wing mirror and damaged the driver's door when the engine started as they walked past! The rider had insurance and the horse was fine, as was the driver (if a little shaken).
@Jiffy fair enough. I don’t actually know if the vehicle was one that switches off as after I waved and passed I was looking ahead for traffic at the cross roads we were at. The other vehicles that’s done it were ignition started, one guy was my uncle so know he started up his pickup as we passed. But sorry @Caol Ila for being on the defensive if I got the wrong angle. I didn’t think the man meant to scare my horse at all.
Yes, I was simply pointing out that stop-start is a thing that will happen a million times a day over the course of someone's drive, so it won't be on the forefront of a driver's mind as a thing. It's happening in the background, like an automatic car changing gears. In any case, the driver probably thinks they are being helpful when they stop for a horse, and remember, most non-horse people don't know how flighty horses are. They won't know that stop-start or manually stopping and starting could potentially spook a horse.

Not long ago, I was riding through the park, and a family saw me and took their kids into the trees alongside the trail. I heard the parents saying to the kids, "Now be very, very quiet so you don't scare the horse." I stopped and said I appreciated their awareness, but then explained that it's actually better to talk and be normal -- so the horse knows they're human -- rather than acting like some weird creature skulking in a bush. Your average punter doesn't know the first thing about equine behaviour, but I appreciate anyone who makes an effort.

Anyway, I'm just happy when drivers don't tailgate me or squeeze past me at 40mph.
 
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scruffyponies

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better to talk and be normal -- so the horse knows they're human
Reminds me of a long ago incident on a bombproof pony who would usually go past anything.
We met a truck which was was full of beaters, chatting to each other. He was NOT OK with the concept of a talking truck.
Only when a few of them got out of the back did he decide it was safe to go anywhere near it.
 

Caol Ila

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Reminds me of a long ago incident on a bombproof pony who would usually go past anything.
We met a truck which was was full of beaters, chatting to each other. He was NOT OK with the concept of a talking truck.
Only when a few of them got out of the back did he decide it was safe to go anywhere near it.
Talking vehicles are always strange. Foinavon and I came out of Mugdock Park, into the carpark, and a couple thought they were being helpful by leaving their dog in their car until we passed. The dog was not happy and started howling and whining like mad. Fin was very concerned by a howling Skoda, and it took a lot of leg and some dancing about to get past.
 

PapaverFollis

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I'm very lucky here. All single track roads with passing places and 99% of drivers very considerate and cheerful. We do get the odd one though and they are usually expecting to squeeze past a 16.1hh brick outhouse of a horse on a road probably less than 3 metres wide (the road is just about wide enough for a car to pass a person on foot safely, but no wider, and for cyclists and horses the only way to pass safely is to hold out for a passing place, tractors and lorries can't even pass pedestrian, there is no room to spare)... no mate, your spacial awareness and risk assessment skills need some serious work. I just hold the middle of the road, shake my head at them, try to mime that the gap is too narrow and either trot on to a passing place or signal for them to reverse to the passing place they have just blown past.

To be fair... usually they sheepishly reverse. I am going to start wearing my camera again though because there's going to be someone that dislikes the embarrassment and turns angry at some point. 🙄

It amazes me how stupid and unaware people in cars are but who are these people? I rarely meet anyone that admits to driving like an idiot. 😝 Although I have met people who will talk about speeding, being annoyed by "slow" drivers and avoiding speed traps...
 

Pearlsasinger

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I'm very lucky here. All single track roads with passing places and 99% of drivers very considerate and cheerful. We do get the odd one though and they are usually expecting to squeeze past a 16.1hh brick outhouse of a horse on a road probably less than 3 metres wide (the road is just about wide enough for a car to pass a person on foot safely, but no wider, and for cyclists and horses the only way to pass safely is to hold out for a passing place, tractors and lorries can't even pass pedestrian, there is no room to spare)... no mate, your spacial awareness and risk assessment skills need some serious work. I just hold the middle of the road, shake my head at them, try to mime that the gap is too narrow and either trot on to a passing place or signal for them to reverse to the passing place they have just blown past.

To be fair... usually they sheepishly reverse. I am going to start wearing my camera again though because there's going to be someone that dislikes the embarrassment and turns angry at some point. 🙄

It amazes me how stupid and unaware people in cars are but who are these people? I rarely meet anyone that admits to driving like an idiot. 😝 Although I have met people who will talk about speeding, being annoyed by "slow" drivers and avoiding speed traps...

One of our special memories of the Westphalian Kaltblut (16hh in all directions) is the time she refused point blank to trot on to a passing place, even though her companion did so. She simply ignored my instructions, kept turning her head and glaring at the woman behind us who kept revving her engine. I could virtually hear her saying "If you rev your engine one more time, lady, I will sit on your car!" Fortunately we reached the passing place, even at a (very) slow walk before she could actually carry out her threat.
 

scruffyponies

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Had an eye-opener guiding a work colleague down a single lane with passing places road. He full on panicked, and genuinely had no idea what he should do if anything came the other way. He had clearly spent his entire driving life in a planned, urban environment, and was incapable of processing that he might have to stop or pull aside.
 

Tiddlypom

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Had an eye-opener guiding a work colleague down a single lane with passing places road. He full on panicked, and genuinely had no idea what he should do if anything came the other way. He had clearly spent his entire driving life in a planned, urban environment, and was incapable of processing that he might have to stop or pull aside.
I come from rural Devon, and we used to encounter such drivers all the time. Many simply couldn’t reverse a car to save their lives, and they had no idea of how to cope with single track lanes.
 

Nasicus

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I come from rural Devon, and we used to encounter such drivers all the time. Many simply couldn’t reverse a car to save their lives, and they had no idea of how to cope with single track lanes.
I'm in rural devon, and my god are drivers with no idea how to reverse the bane of my travels. Also drivers taking the most single track, rural lane possible as a shortcut, and then refusing to go anywhere near the hedge to let others pass because they 'don't want to scratch the paintwork'. If that's the case, stick to the bloody main roads, not the most untrimmed, bramble and branch laden lane possible 🤬

Silver lining, as a result my reversing is on point and I take a sadistic joy in showing up blokes in sports cars who can't reverse with my own reversing skills. I give them a wink and finger-guns when they go past after. I'm petty 😎
 

Rowreach

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Reminds me of a long ago incident on a bombproof pony who would usually go past anything.
We met a truck which was was full of beaters, chatting to each other. He was NOT OK with the concept of a talking truck.
Only when a few of them got out of the back did he decide it was safe to go anywhere near it.
And this reminds me of Leaf Blower Man, who saw me coming along a wooded path, very kindly switched off his leaf blower and then disappeared behind a bush, leaving his leaf blower behind. Horse (he was a sensitive soul) was absolutely adamant that this was a trap. Leaf Blower Man didn't respond to my request to reappear and I ended up getting off and leading Horse past the demon monster. Sometimes the best of intentions misfire.
 

Caol Ila

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The other day, we passed a woman wearing a long black dress with a large camera on a tripod, crouched on the side of the trail with her back to us, taking artsy, low-angle photos of rocks and trees, as far as I could tell. My horse was very unsure of this five-legged beast. I struck up a conversation with her: "Hi, how are you?" If she spoke, the horse would know she was a person, and he would be fine. The woman turned and looked at me as if I was nuts, like, Why is this random person on the trail talking to me?

I said, "My horse needs to know you're human so he's not scared." I'm not sure that explanation makes much sense to non-horsefolk, lol!

"Oh," she said, still looking baffled. But she was standing and speaking, which was all we needed.
 

Tarragon

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My last pony was very worried about the many D of E groups we meet, with their big backpacks covered in waterproof covers - they are definitely not human :rolleyes:
 

Tarragon

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I also wonder how those who drive their ponies and horses along these single track roads - what would happen if you meet an obnoxious stubborn driver who refuses to reverse??
 

Caol Ila

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My last pony was very worried about the many D of E groups we meet, with their big backpacks covered in waterproof covers - they are definitely not human :rolleyes:
We ran into D of E kids in the Mugdock visitor's centre carpark last month. Both my friend and I gently took in our reins, as we were not sure how the horses would react to the huge backpacks with orange overs and attached thermarests, but both geldings were surprisingly sensible.
 

Tracking_up

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My old horse was once very concerned about my instructor. She was wearing one of those long/puffy Pikeur warm coats, so had no legs, and might possibly have been a 5ft 5 penguin?? Horses clearly see us with limbs, so no limbs (covered with clothing) = strange human/not human, as CI/Tarragon note above.....
 

Clodagh

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I'm in rural devon, and my god are drivers with no idea how to reverse the bane of my travels. Also drivers taking the most single track, rural lane possible as a shortcut, and then refusing to go anywhere near the hedge to let others pass because they 'don't want to scratch the paintwork'. If that's the case, stick to the bloody main roads, not the most untrimmed, bramble and branch laden lane possible 🤬

Silver lining, as a result my reversing is on point and I take a sadistic joy in showing up blokes in sports cars who can't reverse with my own reversing skills. I give them a wink and finger-guns when they go past after. I'm petty 😎
I admit if the car coming towards me is driven by an older person or is a new 4x4 driven by a woman I just do my speedy back up even if I have to go much further than they would. Life is just too short to watch someone snake backwards, stop, shuffle forwards, snake backwards again…
 

Nasicus

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I admit if the car coming towards me is driven by an older person or is a new 4x4 driven by a woman I just do my speedy back up even if I have to go much further than they would. Life is just too short to watch someone snake backwards, stop, shuffle forwards, snake backwards again…
I give them a chance to prove me wrong, but the moment they start heading towards the hedge I just go back myself, even if it's up a steep hill and back around a corner. Quicker for me to do that for 100 meters than watch them try reach the passing place 10 meters behind them 🤣
 

scruffyponies

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I also wonder how those who drive their ponies and horses along these single track roads - what would happen if you meet an obnoxious stubborn driver who refuses to reverse??
We pull aside usually, but if I meet one who has just driven past a passing place they could and should have stopped at, even if there's just about room to pass I keep my horse in the middle and advance in short, threatening micro-steps (usually associated with head tosses from restrained horse). So far this has always been enough to make them find reverse pretty quickly.
 

PapaverFollis

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Silver lining, as a result my reversing is on point and I take a sadistic joy in showing up blokes in sports cars who can't reverse with my own reversing skills. I give them a wink and finger-guns when they go past after. I'm petty 😎
That made me laugh more than it probably should have. 😁 I must be petty too. 🤣
 

crazyandme

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My old horse was once very concerned about my instructor. She was wearing one of those long/puffy Pikeur warm coats, so had no legs, and might possibly have been a 5ft 5 penguin?? Horses clearly see us with limbs, so no limbs (covered with clothing) = strange human/not human, as CI/Tarragon note above.....
To add onto this, a DWB i had years ago was just coming off box rest and was doing some gentle work in the field when the yard owner came past in a floor length skirt. Cue bogging off at speed, bucking and reversing at speed anytime the YO tried to get near her!
 

Rowreach

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To add onto this, a DWB i had years ago was just coming off box rest and was doing some gentle work in the field when the yard owner came past in a floor length skirt. Cue bogging off at speed, bucking and reversing at speed anytime the YO tried to get near her!
I went to do field checks when very pregnant and wearing a tent dress. Eight sensible hunters hightailing it off to the furthest corner of the field, eyes on stalks and snorting like dragons. A hot air balloon has nothing on me.
 
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