Equi Release gun

Sprat

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Has anyone come across this bit of kit before? I can't find many reviews on it aside from those on the manufactures website. It looks to be a massage gun type thing that claims to alleviate muscle tightness etc.

I am not going to jump on a bandwagon and buy one at this stage, I'll be speaking to my vet physio and see what her recommendations are, but interested in real life reviews if anyone has tried one / owned one?
 

milliepops

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Be interested to hear what your physio says. i've seen quite a few physios post their concerns about clients using these on horses without any guidance. I know a few people who have them to use on themselves which is different because you can decide for yourself what it feels like ;)
 

Sprat

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That's interesting. It looks like a fairly hefty bit of kit so would assume in uneducated hands it could cause problems. I'm seeing physio in the next few weeks so will report back!
 

lialls

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My boyfriend has just ordered a human one for himself and I was sure I had seen someone on Facebook using similar on their horse. My little mare carries some tension in her body and I often hand massage her (back lady recommended getting a message mit) but I’m not sure I’d like to use it on a horse. As milliepops said the horse can’t tell you if its uncomfortable, though I will also be asking my horses back lady her thoughts on it when I next see her too.
 

Scotsbadboy

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I have one .. from ebay for about £16 quid! its great, my horse loves it and he isnt a fan of clipping so its great for helping desensitize him to the clippers as well. My physio said as long as i am gently and he is enjoying it i should crack on and use it ... so i do, pretty much every day or two as part of our grooming, massaging and stretching work (which is pretty much done daily as i enjoy doing it and he love the fuss)

I would not buy it for £100 though thats for sure!
 

Red-1

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I have a different type, it is hard as hell, really hurts, but boy, does it release tight muscles. I use it on myself, and on the horse if there is an issue. I would describe it as a nice pain.

If you get it on a bone it jumps and thumps, nasty.

But, once the horses are used to it, they love it. I would dispute that you won't know what the horse feels like, they sure seem expressive to me.

I have the equilibrium pad too, that is relaxing. The thumper massager is not at all relaxing but has saved me from some sticky situations where I have gone into spasm.

I use judiciously on the horse, large muscle groups only, rump and hamstrings. If a horse objected or didn't very quickly settle into it, I would cease use.
 

Red-1

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I have one .. from ebay for about £16 quid! its great, my horse loves it and he isnt a fan of clipping so its great for helping desensitize him to the clippers as well. My physio said as long as i am gently and he is enjoying it i should crack on and use it ... so i do, pretty much every day or two as part of our grooming, massaging and stretching work (which is pretty much done daily as i enjoy doing it and he love the fuss)

I would not buy it for £100 though thats for sure!
Yes, it does look very similar to this...

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Massage-...4be39daada2d22a2dd83|ampid:PL_CLK|clp:2334524

Mine was from about 15 years ago, I think at that time it was around £350, but I got it at HOYS or somewhere for £199 with free foot massager too.
 

Sprat

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Thanks Red. My mare is pretty expressive and would certainly make her feelings known if she wasn't enjoying something!
 

Tash88

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I've seen these and my horse's sports massage lady is similarly concerned about people using them on their horses without knowing what they are doing. I agree with her, she has had four years of training to do what she does and even though I am an experienced owner, I wouldn't be comfortable using it on a horse. They can cause a lot of damage if used incorrectly and she has had to 'fix' horses when that has happened. If they bounce off a bone it can be really sore and cause muscle issues and I wouldn't want to be responsible for that.

I think regular massage/physio/whatever you have, sympathetic exercise, and use of massage pads etc. when grooming is the way forward myself!
 

Scotsbadboy

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I've seen these and my horse's sports massage lady is similarly concerned about people using them on their horses without knowing what they are doing. I agree with her, she has had four years of training to do what she does and even though I am an experienced owner, I wouldn't be comfortable using it on a horse. They can cause a lot of damage if used incorrectly and she has had to 'fix' horses when that has happened. If they bounce off a bone it can be really sore and cause muscle issues and I wouldn't want to be responsible for that.

I think regular massage/physio/whatever you have, sympathetic exercise, and use of massage pads etc. when grooming is the way forward myself!
Thats a really important message from your physio which i dont think i relaid enough in my post that my first time using mine was with my physio when she visited so she was able to show me where to use it (major muscle groups and on the lowest setting)
 

Roxylola

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I've looked at these, seen the hype and also the physios who suggest its not such a good idea. I remember once sitting in one of those shiatsu chairs you get at motorway services etc - I think it was a free demo at work or something. The majority was fine - but there was a spot in my back which must have been knotted or something and as soon as the thing went over that it really hurt, I had to move away from it completely. Now obviously that's a tight spot, and logically I know that, but from being like yeah its OK for the rest to just that one spot being unbearable was amazing, there was no warning pain just all fine to owowowow! And even knowing its a knot, and that massage would help I couldn't make myself endure it. Imagine being a horse on the receiving end of that
 

Branna

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If you get it on a bone it jumps and thumps, nasty.

But, once the horses are used to it, they love it. I would dispute that you won't know what the horse feels like, they sure seem expressive to me.

I have the equilibrium pad too, that is relaxing. The thumper massager is not at all relaxing but has saved me from some sticky situations where I have gone into spasm.

I use judiciously on the horse, large muscle groups only, rump and hamstrings. If a horse objected or didn't very quickly settle into it, I would cease use.
This.

I bought one a few months ago with the intention of using it on me and my mare. I think if you use it on yourself its quite obvious what muscle groups it suits and where would make sense to use it on a horse. I only use it on rump, hamstrings and carefully on the neck (equilibrium massage pad on the back). She wasn't sure at first about the vibration but now obviously enjoys it - she is the type that makes her feelings known when the physio goes from a comfortable bit to a sore bit and I have no doubt she would let me know too!

Edited to add - I did ask a physio about them and she said they shouldn't do any harm. This was a new physio I hadn't used before and she was very happy with the way my mare was feeling, the only one out of 8 on the yard that didn't need a 6 weekly follow up so I must be doing something right :p
 

SpottyTB

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I have one, which I bought to use on my boys rump, hamstrings and on his neck (carefully).. However my husband has stolen it. He uses it every day on his lower back (he's a farrier so gets a lot of soreness there) and really rates it. I've used it 4 times on my boy who is very sensitive and would certainly let me know if it hurt. He loves it, stretches and presses into it on certain spots. He had the chiropractor today and she said he felt great.

Its got 20 levels and I only ever use it at a maximum of 5 and as I said above, I use it on his backside and neck only... well I would if I could get T to give it back ;)
 

Sprat

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Thanks all, seems like a really mixed bag of reviews.

Physio next week so I'll be asking her opinion. I may buy a cheap one for my own back and sore shoulder though!
 

Fransurrey

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I wouldn't buy the Equi-release simply because it's a human massage gun with equestrian price tag. I have a gun for myself. Have considered using it on large muscle groups on the horse, but I don't think he needs it and I'm already having to let the cat have a go as she goes nuts for the big ball attachment.:D
 

Sprat

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Another thread has prompted me to update this one!

I spoke to my physio about the equi release guns, she was fairly ambivalent. Her view was that if the user was educated and understood where best to use the guns, then it wouldn't be the worst thing in the world, but her concerns were gung ho owners who went mad using the gun anywhere and everywhere on the body, which could cause discomfort, especially if boshed against bone. The biggest issue discussed above thread, was that horses can't tell us if it's uncomfortable and to stop.

She also said the risk of using the guns too often could be detrimental; if a muscle is tight, then yes it could benefit from the use of the percussion gun, but continual pummelling of a muscle that is no longer tight will then break down said muscle and cause distress.

I personally use massage techniques and if needed, a tens machine which I've had good results from, so I won't be forking out the money for one.
 

milliepops

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thanks for the update. after this thread i read another article from a different physio who said she had encountered deep bruising caused by these massage guns on horses that had happily let their owners use them. so it's interesting to hear your physio's thoughts.
 

Sprat

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Yes that's the risk I guess. While I am 99% sure my mare would absolutely tell me if she wasn't enjoying something (she does have a flair for the dramatics at the best of times), I just wouldn't risk it.
 

Gloi

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I must say I am as suspicious about physios putting this down as I am about farriers saying the horse won't go without shoes. Seeing income going away.
 

LEC

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thanks for the update. after this thread i read another article from a different physio who said she had encountered deep bruising caused by these massage guns on horses that had happily let their owners use them. so it's interesting to hear your physio's thoughts.
I use one on myself and sometimes can have after effects for 2 days later with being sore to release my hamstrings and knots around my glutes. I would never use one on the horse as you have no idea about the law of unintended consequences with doing it. At least with myself I can stop or alter it’s positioning if getting too much.
 

milliepops

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I must say I am as suspicious about physios putting this down as I am about farriers saying the horse won't go without shoes. Seeing income going away.
but the role of a physio is more than just pummeling the muscles. it's about feeling, visualising problems such as asymmetry or movement dysfunction, switching on muscles that are not doing their job properly etc etc.... if your physio is just doing the same job as a massage gun then I'd say you aren't using the best person for your horse.
 

Trouper

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I use one on myself and sometimes can have after effects for 2 days later with being sore to release my hamstrings and knots around my glutes. I would never use one on the horse as you have no idea about the law of unintended consequences with doing it. At least with myself I can stop or alter it’s positioning if getting too much.
I echo this. Having had one used on me by a physio I can agree that it can be quite painful at times - and that is in the hands of a professional. At least I could give feedback.
I hate to think what some horses might go thro with amateurs at the helm. If an equine physio needs to use one because their hands alone are not enough, then that is a different matter.
I am not sure it is a question of income depletion.
 

ester

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My chiro has a theragun, which is used only briefly.
I've considered getting one for me but I think getting it in the right places would be tricky without assistance.
I really don't think I'd use one on a horse.
 
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