France to impose certificate of knowledge

teapot

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I don't see what's wrong with horse owning remaining a sport of the relatively wealthy, like flying and skiing. There are many things in life that various groups of people aspire to and put themselves out to make happen if they can. I don't see removing aspiration as beneficial to society.
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Define wealthy? £50 a lesson or £95 a lesson? It's already on a slippery slope, and if lessons become too expensive for the average person (or majority) to pay, you'll see the demise of many riding schools, and an industry's worth of coaches, grooms, and horses that may not have a home otherwise gone too.
 

ycbm

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Define wealthy? £50 a lesson or £95 a lesson? It's already on a slippery slope, and if lessons become too expensive for the average person to pay, you'll see the demise of many riding schools, and an industry's worth of coaches, grooms etc with it too.

I said relatively wealthy, there is no precise definition.

What do you want to happen to stop riding schools being priced out of existence? Subsidy by tax payers who may be struggling to pay their gas bill?
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teapot

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I said relatively wealthy, there is no precise definition.

What do you want to happen to stop riding schools being priced out of existence? Subsidy by tax payers who may be struggling to pay their gas bill?
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Actually, no. I want the industry dragged into the 21st century where they have a business plan, decent money management, and an understanding that hiking prices doesn't always solve their problems. An understanding that charging £2.50 to bring in a livery but £90 for a private lesson is a false economy, an understanding that having empty lesson slots during the day but zero evening/weekend provision is a poor business model, realising that £600 a month for full livery is too cheap etc etc.

There is such poor management around it makes me angry, and it is the general public who end up getting priced out of an industry they're remarkably keen to support.
 
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ycbm

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Actually, no. I want the industry dragged into the 21st century where they have a business plan, decent money management, and an understanding that hiking processes doesn't always solve their problems. An understanding that charging £2.50 to bring in a livery but £90 for a private lesson is a false economy, an understanding that having empty lesson slots during the day but zero evening/weekend provision is a poor business model etc etc.
With you there!
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tristar

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I'm not for or against this certificate of knowledge idea, but I do think a distinction has to be made between small animals and horses, as small animals are much more likely to be solely looked after by their owner and so much more in need of competent owners.


Sorry?? The French are no better than the British, even if in a different way.
well if that is what you think, that is what you think!
 

lynz88

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This reminds me of the gun control debate for which I don't think anyone has an answer. You need a licence and to register your guns back home which is all fine and well....but the only people who will do both of these things are those individuals that aren't going to flout the law anyways. So the policy misses the mark and puts more burden on those who don't actually need it.
 

Keith_Beef

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trying to impose the attitudes of britain on the french does not work, its a different more sophisticated society with totally alien concepts, around horses, some backwards some very much in advance, the english may not do it but the french may see it as step in the right direction
One person's sophistication is another's complication.
 

paddy555

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Actually, no. I want the industry dragged into the 21st century where they have a business plan, decent money management, and an understanding that hiking prices doesn't always solve their problems. An understanding that charging £2.50 to bring in a livery but £90 for a private lesson is a false economy, an understanding that having empty lesson slots during the day but zero evening/weekend provision is a poor business model, realising that £600 a month for full livery is too cheap etc etc.

There is such poor management around it makes me angry, and it is the general public who end up getting priced out of an industry they're remarkably keen to support.
proprietors lacking business acumen are common over many areas not just riding establishments. Just because someone is an expert or at least good at something does not mean they are good at running a business. This applies very much with something like riding establishments.

I had a friend in a similar situation. (not horses) he was one of the top people in the country in his specialisation. He had a guaranteed market. People had no choice but to use either his services or those of similar businesses.
If he and his business had been properly managed he would have made a fortune.. He was a lousy businessman and didn't. He suffered and the public who wanted his services suffered. He couldn't see that being good at an activity was very different from being good at running a business. The two were entirely different things. . He was very similar to many riding establishment proprietors.
I could see everything you could see in your post above. Dragging him into any recent century would have been impossible.
I looked at many businesses including riding establishments and couldn't believe they could be so badly run and the opportunities they were missing.
It is a great shame.
 

teapot

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proprietors lacking business acumen are common over many areas not just riding establishments. Just because someone is an expert or at least good at something does not mean they are good at running a business. This applies very much with something like riding establishments.

I had a friend in a similar situation. (not horses) he was one of the top people in the country in his specialisation. He had a guaranteed market. People had no choice but to use either his services or those of similar businesses.
If he and his business had been properly managed he would have made a fortune.. He was a lousy businessman and didn't. He suffered and the public who wanted his services suffered. He couldn't see that being good at an activity was very different from being good at running a business. The two were entirely different things. . He was very similar to many riding establishment proprietors.
I could see everything you could see in your post above. Dragging him into any recent century would have been impossible.
I looked at many businesses including riding establishments and couldn't believe they could be so badly run and the opportunities they were missing.
It is a great shame.
Oh absolutely!

The difference is riding schools as businesses are unique in as much as they provide a service involving a third party that has a required standard of care and costs a fortune to keep. You don't need staff to check your golf clubs or gym equipment in comparison.
 

Goldenstar

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My comment about subsidising horse riding was not about supporting the hobbies of the wealthy but enabling access of more people to equestrianism. The benefits of contact with animals are pretty undisputed and in many ways - why should horses remain the privilege of the wealthy when many, many other sports are more open (thanks to lottery funding and other subsidies) to everyone?

I just don't get why experienced and educated horse owners would resent getting their bit of paper to try and improve education and welfare either. But we are all different and thankfully entitled to freedom of opinion.
I would resent it because it would cost me time and money and it would not improve animal welfare .
 
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