having to resell due to accident

DabDab

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I'm not sure from the information given that this horse does sound particularly unsuitable for the OP...?

It's main issue before the fall seemed to be that it wasn't working correctly when schooling, but the instructor involved seemed to think the OP was capable of improving the horse and improvements were apparently being seen. The same 'fault' could be found in a lot of horses for sale. And then it spooked and whipped round, which again a lot of horses are liable to do from time to time, though granted some are easier to stick on than others. The danger with rushing to sell what sounds like a fairly reasonable sort of riding horse to buy another is that it may end up as an out of the frying pan into the fire type situation.

Were you wearing a body protector when you had your accident OP? I would say it is well worth investing in an air vest for when you are well and considering riding again. They are a brilliant piece of technology and will offer protection as well as helping you feel a bit more confident after your accident, whatever horse you get back on.
 

brighteyes

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...

ETA because I've just seem IrishMilo's post...normally I would agree with you but the OP's reference to him lacking topline and having a sensitive back and stiff neck, coupled with the fact he is an OTTB would make me wary.
I am not sure how much experience (and therefore reliability as regards her horse's issues) the OP has.
 

tenya

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tenya

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INHS = Irish national hunt steeplechase.
It means the horse was signed off as eligible for point to point. So it may well have been point to point raced.[/QUOTE]

Yes, he was P2P raced.
 

tenya

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You sound very inexperienced altogether. I got an ex racer last June. We are 13 months in to the deal and I feel we know one another and have an understanding now. Mine has 'history' and was very successful in his career, so civvy street has been a big adjustment for him, and me along with all that. He is sharp and clever and as an experienced rider I have had some very interesting moments. You haven't had him five minutes, really. My thoughts are you haven't let him settle, haven't really got the experience and coloured the incident (though not the outcome for you) against him.
Im not sure what you are getting at?
I have stated here that he probably got spooked and I didn’t sit it. I have openly admitted to my inexperience and I’ve taken on board all advice given. At the end of the day I got injured and can’t ride anymore and I’d rather he go to a suitable home instead of being given to a dodgy dealer. That’s why I’ve come on here and asked for advice.
 

brighteyes

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Im not sure what you are getting at?
I have stated here that he probably got spooked and I didn’t sit it. I have openly admitted to my inexperience and I’ve taken on board all advice given. At the end of the day I got injured and can’t ride anymore and I’d rather he go to a suitable home instead of being given to a dodgy dealer. That’s why I’ve come on here and asked for advice.
You have now owned up to being inexperienced, which you didn't at the start. At least you are aware of the future he faces and I do hope someone closer to you will give you a hand so you can find him a good home.

Mine isn't easy but he is genuine and kind so all his antics so far have been manageable. I am sorry you got hurt and wish you a speedy recovery.
 

milliepops

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Bit unfair, literally in the first post the OP said she was inexperienced.

sounds like there is a trainer involved anyway since she's been having lessons since buying the horse.

A retrained racehorse is a totally different proposition to one straight off the track. A friend has a retrained horse that's been out and about doing all sorts, he is chilled and easy compared to my livewire that's 12 months into retraining.
I agree with DD there's every chance that with a bit more training this is the right horse for her when she's recovered, if the confidence can be recovered.
 

tenya

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I'm not sure from the information given that this horse does sound particularly unsuitable for the OP...?

It's main issue before the fall seemed to be that it wasn't working correctly when schooling, but the instructor involved seemed to think the OP was capable of improving the horse and improvements were apparently being seen. The same 'fault' could be found in a lot of horses for sale. And then it spooked and whipped round, which again a lot of horses are liable to do from time to time, though granted some are easier to stick on than others. The danger with rushing to sell what sounds like a fairly reasonable sort of riding horse to buy another is that it may end up as an out of the frying pan into the fire type situation.

Were you wearing a body protector when you had your accident OP? I would say it is well worth investing in an air vest for when you are well and considering riding again. They are a brilliant piece of technology and will offer protection as well as helping you feel a bit more confident after your accident, whatever horse you get back on.
Thanks for your comment.

I was unfortunately not wearing a body protector. I was hoping to buy one the week previous but the shop didn’t have my size. The last body protector I had was so old that it was falling apart that’s why I threw it out.

I’m not looking to buy another horse anytime soon. I’ve got months of recovery and physio ahead of me before I’d even be allowed to sit on a horse again.
I just want him to go to a suitable home. So hopefully with the help of professionals he will end up with someone that can give him what he needs.
 

tenya

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You have now owned up to being inexperienced, which you didn't at the start. At least you are aware of the future he faces and I do hope someone closer to you will give you a hand so you can find him a good home.

Mine isn't easy but he is genuine and kind so all his antics so far have been manageable. I am sorry you got hurt and wish you a speedy recovery.
I mentioned in my original post that I am inexperienced and I never stated anything of the opposite.

It was unfortunate that I got injured the way I did.. but the horse is gentle and kind and deserves to go to a good home.
 

tenya

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Bit unfair, literally in the first post the OP said she was inexperienced.

sounds like there is a trainer involved anyway since she's been having lessons since buying the horse.

A retrained racehorse is a totally different proposition to one straight off the track. A friend has a retrained horse that's been out and about doing all sorts, he is chilled and easy compared to my livewire that's 12 months into retraining.
I agree with DD there's every chance that with a bit more training this is the right horse for her when she's recovered, if the confidence can be recovered.
Thanks Milliepops.

The horse was retired from racing in 2012.
I just found out today with a bit of digging that he was with a family from 2012-2014 where he competed in XC.. the main rider was the 11/12 year old daughter.
I’ve contacted the family and am hoping to find out more about him.
However, the last owner is not giving me anything on him.. she called him my “problem”. I don’t think she ever competed with him or did much with him at all as the last year she owned him he was just out in a field untouched. (I was only given this information after my accident)
 

brighteyes

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However, the last owner is not giving me anything on him.. she called him my “problem”. I don’t think she ever competed with him or did much with him at all as the last year she owned him he was just out in a field untouched. (I was only given this information after my accident)
Delightful person.
 

Shay

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Your break sounds serious enough! You don't give your age (fairly so!) I was about ... oh lord you know you are getting on when you have to try to figure it out! About 38 I suppose? They did talk about possibly not pinning but I had lost movement (becuase of unstable bone fragments as it turned out) so they went in to remove them and pinned whilst there. That stablisation brace is the worst! You have my absolute sympathy.

I'm the last one to come down on the medical profressional's side - but you may find riding again a bit of a struggle; and if the fragments don't knit (or are not removed) another fall could put you at massive risk.

If you and your husband are satisfied that you are thinking correctly - or as correctly as you can right now - then perhaps it would be better to sell on. When you do get back to riding you'll need something much quieter - at least to begin with. I wonder if the previous owner might have had a bad experiecne with him too which is why she doesn't want to talk to you?
 

tenya

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Your break sounds serious enough! You don't give your age (fairly so!) I was about ... oh lord you know you are getting on when you have to try to figure it out! About 38 I suppose? They did talk about possibly not pinning but I had lost movement (becuase of unstable bone fragments as it turned out) so they went in to remove them and pinned whilst there. That stablisation brace is the worst! You have my absolute sympathy.

I'm the last one to come down on the medical profressional's side - but you may find riding again a bit of a struggle; and if the fragments don't knit (or are not removed) another fall could put you at massive risk.

If you and your husband are satisfied that you are thinking correctly - or as correctly as you can right now - then perhaps it would be better to sell on. When you do get back to riding you'll need something much quieter - at least to begin with. I wonder if the previous owner might have had a bad experiecne with him too which is why she doesn't want to talk to you?
Thanks Shay.
The brace is a pain.. I wouldn’t wish it on anyone. I’ve a follow up appointment next week so hopefully some healing has happened over the last few weeks.

I think it is only fair to the horse to sell him on as I won’t be able to ride him for a long time.. he deserves a good, loving home. It already breaks my heart having to sell him and it would be different if I had owned him for longer.. but in this situation it’s the right thing to do I think.

I’m starting to think that there was a problem with the previous owner as she was immediately defensive when I contacted her. She was unwilling to speak to me and had no sympathy for me or the horse.
 

Velcrobum

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Pure speculation but the person you bought him from could also be very inexperienced but not willing to admit and was very over-horsed. We have all come across the know-it-all but does not, that OP is not meant as a criticism in your OP as you stated you were inexperienced.

If he has been in a field for a year his musculature will be reduced and he will be on the forehand so not pushing from behind. He has had from 0 to 60 in terms of workload over a 2-3 week period and we all know if you have not exercised for a while then restart the muscles will scream at you.

He sounds a kind type and with a bit of help he could find a very nice competent home. It's early days but perhaps the owners after his racing career might be able to help you find a more suitable home.
 

ycbm

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I’m starting to think that there was a problem with the previous owner as she was immediately defensive when I contacted her. She was unwilling to speak to me and had no sympathy for me or the horse.
This, the defensiveness and the year off, is what makes me feel that before you try to sell him, you should, if you can afford it, x ray his neck, back and hocks. And if you find anything, test the blood from the vetting.

I don't blame you if you feel you can't do this, given that you had a full (?) vetting a month ago, and send him to a reputable selling trainer instead.

What I would not do is sell him privately before he has been assessed over at least two weeks by a pro.
.
 

tenya

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Pure speculation but the person you bought him from could also be very inexperienced but not willing to admit and was very over-horsed. We have all come across the know-it-all but does not, that OP is not meant as a criticism in your OP as you stated you were inexperienced.

If he has been in a field for a year his musculature will be reduced and he will be on the forehand so not pushing from behind. He has had from 0 to 60 in terms of workload over a 2-3 week period and we all know if you have not exercised for a while then restart the muscles will scream at you.

He sounds a kind type and with a bit of help he could find a very nice competent home. It's early days but perhaps the owners after his racing career might be able to help you find a more suitable home.
I can’t comment on the previous owner’s experience.. but I don’t think she did much with him. I think she had a relative do some unaffiliated shows.
Owner gave him to someone else for 3 months to get going again and to sell on her behalf. It was previous to those few months he was not exercised for a year.

I’m sure he will find a competent home in the near future.
 

tenya

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This, the defensiveness and the year off, is what makes me feel that before you try to sell him, you should, if you can afford it, x ray his neck, back and hocks. And if you find anything, test the blood from the vetting.

I don't blame you if you feel you can't do this, given that you had a full (?) vetting a month ago, and send him to a reputable selling trainer instead.

What I would not do is sell him privately before he has been assessed over at least two weeks by a pro.
.
Thanks for your comment.

Im unfortunately not in a position that I can afford the xrays as I have my own medical expenses to cover first. The Irish health system is basically non existing.

He had a 5 stage vetting done 4 weeks ago and the vet didn’t think it was necessary to X-ray him.

I’m going to get him back to a trainer before selling him.
 

Shay

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Thats the best idea. So sorry you have gone through this.

You would be amazed how many riders have broken thier back at some point - although for many is is a veterbral arm fracture rather than a full veterbral break. Speaking from almost two decades since - you can get back to a reasonably normal life with horses. Even if riding again proves too painful you can drive. Thankfully I had private medical insurance so all my braces are made for me and from what I can and can't do. And I still hate them! Going forward you need to get a good physio who understands riders. Ignore the doomsayers - and you'll get them. Riding is dangerous for everyone. (But also don't be silly about it. I used to hunt and event. When I go back on I did dressage and le trec. I miss hunting like mad - but one more fall would be catastrophic.) Surround yourself with medical support who understand your goals and will work with you to achieve them. But over the years I have found a good strong relationship with a great sports physio to be the best thing.
 

Trouper

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I am sorry you have had this awful experience and wish you good luck with your recovery. I am a fan of TBs and ex-racers but they do take particular handling and care and I know I needed help with mine. I, too, would try to do some basic vet investigations to rule out physical pain because asking a trainer to take him on, or selling him, will not be in his best interests if he has a physical problem and you will not make any progress.
One other thought occurs to me (but his age may be against him here) would be to talk to the Racehorse Rehabilitation charities and see if they can give you any advice (or even take him on). I realise your location does not make this easy for mainland charities and I am afraid I am ignorant of any in Eire but I would investigate. I know that when I was considering this with mine (and I won't bore you with the reasons) he would only have needed to pass a stage 2 vetting for them to consider him but I am a bit out of touch now.
I hope you can find a solution.
 

HazuraJane

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I hope your healing process is straightforward and has no complications.
Your ability to self-assess your experience with horses, as well as to describe the situation, is in your favour.
You aren't trying to kid anyone, least of all yourself.

The previous owner telling you 'he's your problem now' tells me this was not lightning out of a blue sky.

Can you manage, as someone suggested, to put him in full evaluation and training with a professional?
One bad spook that you couldn't sit is understandably frightening, particularly with the broken back (!!!).
Putting your horse in training with a non-punitive, very experienced professional, may hold a chance of salvaging the situation.
 

tenya

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I’ve spoken to his first owner since he came off track.

surprise, surprise, he was always very spooky and that’s why he was sold after two years.

He did do a lot of hunter trials and unaffiliated SJ for those two years though.

I don’t think I’ll ever find out what the last owner did with him but like someone else has suggested she was probably over-horsed.
 

misst

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I am sorry for your accident that is terrible but an TB ex racer is not for everyone and he sounds like a nice person underneath the spooks. You were lunging him quite a bit from what you've said so he might just have got a bit fitter than expected. If this happened he might have changed shape too - so saddle fit etc might need changing. It's all a moot point now anyway but it is nice to think he will have another chance.
 

tenya

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I am sorry for your accident that is terrible but an TB ex racer is not for everyone and he sounds like a nice person underneath the spooks. You were lunging him quite a bit from what you've said so he might just have got a bit fitter than expected. If this happened he might have changed shape too - so saddle fit etc might need changing. It's all a moot point now anyway but it is nice to think he will have another chance.
thanks for your reply.
He is a wonderful horse and so well behaved in the arena.
Unfortunately, he does spook in open space.. and I just didn’t see it coming.
Yes, he will probably have to be refitted again.. However, he was only fitted a few days before the accident.
It was just unlucky.

He’s going to a sales livery in a couple of weeks and I’m sure he’s going to find a new forever home.
 

SO1

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Sounds like he would potentially be a nice sports horses for someone who has not got a big budget but is confident and experienced. If he has been jumped competitively by an 11/12 year old child he is probably quite a decent horse that has fallen into the wrong hands due to poor advertising. Hopefully the trainer will be able to get him jumping again if this his forte and sell him to a home to someone who enjoys riding in an arena and perhaps going show jumping, HT and hacking in quiet places where there is not loud machinery and making sure he is getting plenty of turnout and no hard feeds that might be causing him to have extra energy. TBH even quiet horses can get startled and take off if frightened.

I think you just need to try and make sure that whoever does buy him is aware that he is not suitable out hacking for a nervous or inexperienced rider.
 

tenya

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Knowing an 11/12yo who is already producing huge young horses and has nationawide comp record as long as your arm, i never take age of a rider into consideration. An ad saying "has been ridden by an 11yo" means flip all to me now. Has been ridden by a 90yo with no arms or legs might mean more.
Yes, that’s of course right.
The girl that owned him was already competing for years at the time and very experienced.
 
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