How do I discipline something that retaliates worse when told off?? Long post!

lauren_xfx

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Hello! This will be very long

I recently bought a new mare, I’ve had her for nearly a month now.

In terms of being ridden, she’s perfect. She’s good as gold and is so far proving a great fit for me. She’s not spooky, she’s not mare-ish at all to ride even when in season (which she was in when I bought her but she’s now out of season), doesn’t buck etc. Just been really good so far.

However, on the ground I’ve noticed a few issues that I’m not sure how to solve! (She’s not like this all the time, but it’s happened a few times so that’s enough)

I know all new horses tend to test their new owners, especially mares, and they need to be told who’s the boss. Majority of the time, she’s very easy to handle. However... when she has got an issue, she’s extremely mareish and just plain nasty really. But it can be quite dangerous and obviously scary. (I’m going to make her sound like she’s pure evil, she can be but she’s not like that - which is why I definitely want to get this squashed before it becomes something she does all the time)

1) she’s a cow to feed in the stable. She doesn’t like being told to go “back” and wait for her food, the second you tell her to go backwards her ears are flattened right back and she basically launches at you, but she doesn’t just stop there she actually brings her whole body on you and barges straight into you. If you then shout at her or give her a good barge in the chest to get out of your space she then retaliates to being told off by going to bite you more and going at you, but also spins round with her bum at you trying to kick you. By this time she’s corned you against a wall so it’s quite a horrible situation.. I think who’s had her previously has taught her zero stables manners
However... this is where it’s odd. She will NOT act like this if you stick her head-collar and rope on prior to entering the stable. When this is on, you can tell her to go back all you like (she pulls faces at you but keeps it just as faces) and she will even stand there and wait to be told she’s allowed her food..??? Without a headcollar on she’s the devil?
(She’s also not protective over her actual food because when she’s eating it, headcollar or not you can take it away from her, touch her face, be next to her, etc etc which is even more strange because it seems like a protective over food situation)

2) she’s a cow to change her rug in the feild. If you change the rug in her feild she will try and bite you when you’re doing the straps at the front, she then will get dead narky with you and can again try and kick you.
However this has been easily fixed by again, putting on the headcollar before doing it and she stands there nicely whilst you do it.

3) she’s typical mare and tries to bite you when you’re doing up her girth, but once you’ve done one hole she leaves you alone. Once the tack is on her she’s completely different! Sweet as anything

4) lastly... in the feild if she’s just got a grump on or if you try to make her do something like going back, she again can get really narky like in the stable and has tried to kick me a couple times.. For instance for absolutely no reason she attacked my other horse whilst I was taking her out to the feild over the fence tonight and was completely back-barrelling the fence at her (petrified my other horse to the point she wouldn’t come past anymore) and I went into the feild to move her away from the fence and because I told her to go away from me she went for me and then span round and actually kicked out at me.. I then had to get her in about 20 mins later and she was absolutely fine

She always comes over the fence when I walk over to the feild, she neighs at me, she’s easy to catch, good in hand, etc. Just these little areas.. It’s like she doesn’t like it if she’s told what to do?

The issue I have is I want to nip these behaviours in the bud especially before they get bigger or more frequent... I want her to have stable manners and be able to be fed without being squashed and without having to put a headcollar on her, I want to be able to try and change rugs without being bitten and without a headcollar, and I do NOT want her to think it’s okay to try and kick me and bite me... and I want to be able but things like the trying to kick and bite me, I thought maybe it was just a threat but it’s not?
The issue is, she doesn’t just respond to being shouted at and be like “oh, I won’t do that then” instead she retaliates and does it more as if she’s basically telling me to F off, don’t you dare tell me off..

So, what I need help with is: How can I discipline her to stop these behaviours when it just makes her do it more at me and makes her meaner? I would take a crop with me in these situations but for example I don’t think giving her a smack whilst she’s trying to kick me would have a good ending for me!😂😂 I think somebody’s just let her walk all over them before but I don’t want her to be like that, I am the boss, but I also don’t want to purposely put myself in a dangerous situation for the sake of it

Thanks!!
 

meleeka

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I think you need to change your mindset. You cannot “tell a mare who’s boss”, that’s just asking for a battle which you aren’t going to win imo. She sounds like she’s either feeling insecure or there’s pain somewhere. If putting a headcollar on is what you need to do for now, then I think you ought to be grateful she allows you to handle her safely and continue to put it on her. My mare was also horrible when I got her. I almost sent her back from where she came but decided to put a time limit on it and sure enough, by the end of the two month period she’d settled right down. I didn’t ever get myself in a position where she felt she needed to bite or kick me. I left her alone when eating and tied her up when I needed to do anything. I made sure I treated her with kindness, with plenty of praise and never got cross. I did tell her no when I needed to, but certainly never smacked or shouted at her. 10 years later and this horse worships me. I can do anything with her and I know she trusts me completely. She sometimes puts her ears back (she is a mare after all!) but I’ll just say “that’s enough” and they come forward again. She’d never dream of following through with any aggression.

Stop going into battle with her and allow her to work out that you aren’t a threat and she’ll settle down I’m sure. You just can’t “be the boss” with a mare, it has to be mutual respect.
 

HashRouge

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This behaviour doesn't sound normal. It could be that you have a very reactionary, stroppy mare and that is just how she is, in which case I would not be feeding her or changing her rugs without her having her head collar on, ever. You aren't going to win this one by telling her off, so I would stop worrying about how to discipline her! Head collar on at all times when handling her, and tied up when possible. Be quiet and firm with her, no smacking or shouting - let her learn to trust and respect you. However, from the behaviour you have described I would initially be looking into either ulcers or some sort of hormonal issue. I really don't think it is normal for a horse to be this reactionary and aggressive. My mare for example had issues with her ovaries that caused her to be very aggressive - she attacked my friend in the field, and also cornered a youngster and beat seven bells out of him. We'd owned her for seven years by this point and knew this wasn't normal - scanning her ovaries confirmed this and after a month on regumate she was back to normal.
 

Jinx94

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As you've only had her a month, she's possibly (probably?) still quite unsettled and insecure.

Give her time. If you can handle her safely when she has a headcollar on then do that. Do not keep putting yourself in danger and her in a situation that she is clearly finding extremely stressful, especially if there is a safe way of doing these things. I completely agree with what most other posters have said regarding avoiding harsh reactions.

If you keep going at every situation as though it is a battle, that is what she will be expecting and it will only make the situation worse. Take things a step at a time. You don't *need* to handle her without putting a headcollar on. It may seem faster, but it doesn't take more than a few seconds to put a headcollar on and I'm sure that it would save you time in the long run.

It wouldn't hurt to have a vet out to give her a general check, just in case the behaviour is somehow pain related. Imo, this doesn't sound like the result of a previous owner/handler letting her get away with bad behaviour.

Don't hesitate to get a professional involved - a fresh perspective (not from a forum) could make a huge difference to your understanding and handling techniques. You might be surprised at how quickly her behaviour turns around.
 

9tails

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Agree with the others, your attitude is a bit off. Headcollar on for now, do what you need to do and leave her alone when eating. Same with changing rugs, the last thing you want to do is have the horse charging off with a half on rug.

My mare is full of character; when leading her she air bites behind me, flehmens and pulls faces. When I turn round, there's this angelic creature with ears forward and eyes full of love.
 

chaps89

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So horse misbehaves without headcollar but is good with one on. You want horse to behave. So what's the big deal about putting a headcollar on? Horse behaves so seems like a no brainer solution to me.

And I'm not a fan generally of changing rugs in a field without one on anyway - what if they walk/take off whilst rug is half on half off - at least with headcollar on they're not going to get far.

You can't tell a mare what to do, but you can be quietly firm and no nonsense.
You may be best getting some ground work assistance from someone - dare I say it, maybe even someone with a natural horsemanship approach.

The reaction to being girthed up though and general tetchiness would you have me wondering about pain - ulcers or hormonal perhaps.
 

Bellaboo18

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Poor mare, she's come to a new home, is unsettled and she's telling you when she's unhappy, you're ignoring her and trying to bully her into thinking you're the boss.
Have you had a mare before? Like others have said you'll get no where fighting with her, well other than a & e.
You need to be far more sympathetic with her. Put her headcollar on and you'll get the behaviour you want. Give her time to settle and trust you.
She's trying to bite you when you do up her girth because she's in pain. If she's not got ulcers now she will have soon from the stress you're putting her through.
Please don't shout at her and barge her in the chest. Ideally find her a more suitable home and get a laid back gelding.
What a sad thread.
 

saddleoversofa

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Personally I don’t believe a horse is ‘nasty’ or a ‘cow’ and certainly is not telling you to ‘F off’, like others have said they normally react to pain or poor training. You say it’s like no one has trained her to stand still, but they absolutely have - with a head collar on! IME people who tend to act aggressively around horses are nervous or inexperienced/out of their depth.

Short term I would use a head collar whenever dealing with her, even grooming and feeding in the stable. This is obviously how she has been trained to know it’s time to listen to you.

Long term I think you should seek help or lessons on groundwork from a trainer/experienced people in person. Your behaviour is aggressive and you will get hurt if this continues. We can never over rule a horses body but we can train their mind and this is what you need training on. If not the cycle of: carrying out task - mare reacts out of misunderstanding/possible pain memory/poor body language on your behalf - aggressive response from yourself - mare learns next time she must scale up her behaviour to get her way.

This is not to say you have to be ‘soft’ or a ‘push over’ around horses, but reprimanding them instead of training them is never going to work in the long run. I bought a mare last autumn who had serious issues on the ground and had no idea how to respond to pressure, and would panic and the situation could quickly become dangerous for all involved. I got training for myself (yes they worked with the horse but mainly I had to learn how to handle a horse in a more conscious way... I have been around horses the whole of my life but have now learnt that many are very forgiving of poor instruction on the ground from people) and now both me and the mare are much happier and the issues on a whole are completely resolved.

You are lucky that previous horses have been less sensitive and more tolerant and therefore discipline through shouting or hitting them has “worked”. I suspect the mare is also playing up as this behaviour gets a reaction and it is becoming trained into her to respond this way so seek help sooner rather than later.

PS. To previous posters, a gelding doesn’t deserve to be treated like this either.
 

Jinx94

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OP, just another note.

A friend of mine had a mare (many, many years ago) that reacted in a similar fashion with the stable behaviour. It turned out that she had been battered in the stable to the point that she felt she had no other option than to fight. The handlers at her previous home used to arm themselves with a broom before they went in - I'm sure it goes without saying, but DO NOT do this.

She took a long while to 'come good'. She was never calm and happy about you going into the stable, but she did eventually tolerate it. On their part it took months of calm, confident and consistent handling. They worked WITH the mare to find what worked for her, and that is the most important thing with cases like this.
 

Tiddlypom

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Did you sell the mare you recently posted about that you'd had for a year?
'I have a really high strung horse and i need help!'
Quite. The OP has to date two posts to her name, each bemoaning the fact that she can’t get on with a mare. From April...
I’m wondering if somebody could help me with my mare...
She’s a 15.3hh Irish sports horse. I’ve owned her for a year now, and I haven’t really got very far with her..
OP, you are out of your depth. Pass the horses on to someone who has a clue.
 

SEL

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Due to issues as a baby my mare is very anxious around food and her stable - in fact I think if you use the word anxious instead of aggressive it changed your mindset in dealing with them.

We have a "headcollar on at all times" sign outside the stable. She knows that means something is happening and concentrates. Never go in her stable while she is eating - that's also on a sign!

With her I try and reward the good behaviour and take a deep breath with the not so great stuff - & ask again.
 

little_critter

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I’d agree that trying to boss this mare (or most mares for that fact) doesn’t sound like it will work. To me she sounds unsettled and is being aggressive at you as a defence (ie she gets you before you have a chance to hurt her).
I don’t think shouting and telling off will work. Why not try positive reinforcement. Praise (and lots of it) when she does the right thing. Don’t ‘tell off’ the wrong behaviour, ignore it. Good behaviour gets praise, bad behaviour gets nothing. Mares are clever, she should quickly work out how this works.
It would probably be a good idea to look for a trainer who works with positive reinforcement training / clicker training to get you on the right track. Depending on where you are I can suggest a very good one.
 

JillA

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OP, just another note.

A friend of mine had a mare (many, many years ago) that reacted in a similar fashion with the stable behaviour. It turned out that she had been battered in the stable to the point that she felt she had no other option than to fight. The handlers at her previous home used to arm themselves with a broom before they went in - I'm sure it goes without saying, but DO NOT do this.

She took a long while to 'come good'. She was never calm and happy about you going into the stable, but she did eventually tolerate it. On their part it took months of calm, confident and consistent handling. They worked WITH the mare to find what worked for her, and that is the most important thing with cases like this.
^^^^This. The behaviour you describe is self defence, and you are just confirming her need to defend herself if you try to bully her into submission, it will just get worse. I don't know where you are but I would suggest you get someone who specialises in working with the horse instead of using coercion. This is a good place to start https://www.intelligenthorsemanship.co.uk/recommended-trainers/ or someone who has followed Mark Rashid.

On the + side - strong willed mares like yours can be world beaters if you get them on your side, they will do anything for you. But you have to be a LEADER, not a boss and there is a huge difference
 

HeyMich

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I have an old retired mare that is a bit of a cowbag in field when I'm changing rugs. She stands like an angel when I put her head collar on though. So guess what? I use a head collar. Simples 😉

And no, you can't tell a mare what to do. You ask them. You create a trust and friendship, and you'll find you have to ask less and less. Once you have the bond and understanding, they are the most wonderful horses to own.

Good luck, and get help if you need it.
 

Red-1

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I think some of the replies have been worded harshly, but I do agree with a lot of the sentiment that you need to change your approach and mental attitude to the issues. You are asking for help so I hope you genuinely want to change, rather than just have someone tell you how to punish the horse without being kicked.

Firstly I would quit the "typical mare" attitude. All horses are different, yours has a lot of good points, and some areas where she is confused and worried.

Secondly, I agree with another poster that your horse HAS been trained. She is great with a headcollar. She is willing and confident when ridden. So, she is willing and co-operative in a situation for which she has been trained how to react.

If you wish to do things differently, then you will have to train her how to respond to the different situation. This, I think, is where the crux of the problem occurs. I can't see any evidence that you have tried to train her at all, you seem to just do new things then meter out punishment if she does not do the "correct" thing. That is not training. That is confusing. Horses don't do confusion well, especially of you then shout at her, hit her, barge into her.

I was going to go into more detail on how I think you could move forward, but TBH I do think that you are thinking on such a different path that you should get help in person from someone clued in with animal behaviour, so you can watch and learn, then try and have help refining your responses. If you tell people where you are based then I am sure someone can recommend a trainer who could help. There are good ones and bad ones, so a personal recommendation is needed.

Great things can be accomplished in 1 hour. Because it is not the training that will happen in 1 hour, it is the way you think of the problem. Once you are thinking FOR the horse, rather than trying to work out the quickest way to have the horse do what you want... well it is so huge a shift I don't think I can explain how you will benefit. And the horse will benefit. And what a huge difference it will make in teamwork, enjoyment, and you may well even stop caring about things you think are important right now.
 

Pearlsasinger

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Great things can be accomplished in 1 hour. Because it is not the training that will happen in 1 hour, it is the way you think of the problem. Once you are thinking FOR the horse, rather than trying to work out the quickest way to have the horse do what you want... well it is so huge a shift I don't think I can explain how you will benefit. And the horse will benefit. And what a huge difference it will make in teamwork, enjoyment, and you may well even stop caring about things you think are important right now.

This.

Horses will tell you what you need to know, if you just listen to them. In the meantime, if your horse behaves as you want her to when you put a headcollar on, then FFS put the headcollar on.

It is not typical mare behaviour to nip when being girthed. I have had 2 out of 12 who threatened to bite when being tacked up, they both had physical problems, which we sorted out and the behaviour stopped.
 

LadyGascoyne

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I think you need to try to separate some of these behaviors from “being a typical mare”.

1. Personal space

Likes her space in the stable or field, and occasionally a bit grumpy if being fussed with when she doesn’t feel like it - typical mare

Launches at you and tried to bite and kick - serious behavioral issue, needs working through

2. Discipline

Doesn’t like being forced or told to do something when she doesn’t feel like it - typical mare

Reacting with aggression - serious behavioral issue, not ok

3. Girth and straps

Being a bit ‘girthy’ or grumpy about straps - typical mare and possibly feeling a bit hormonal, bloated and uncomfortable that day (totally empathise)

Actually biting or kicking when girth and straps are done - possibly pain response, I would check saddle, back and consider ulcers depending on management regime and other symptoms

4. Attacking other horses

Making her point, standing her ground, being a bit bossy and asserting her dominance, occasionally grumpy - typical mare

Attacking other horses to the point of concern about injury - first consideration would be insecurity around being new, and possibly needs to settle but I would be taking shoes off and even keeping separated but in adjacent fields if she really means it.

Hope this helps, I love mares. I usually try to see things from their perspective and approach things from a position of giving them an acceptable solution rather than pushing them into making a bad decision and then disciplining them for their reaction.

I also know exactly what it’s like to wake up feeling cranky and bloated, wanting nothing more than to spend all day in bed with a good book and a bucket of chocolate, and still have to put on my high heels and bra and smile at the people at work.

So for me, I appreciate that my girls may not always be in a fabulous mood, and I don’t expect absolute consistency in their headspace, but I do expect them to put on their bra and heels, and go to work.
 
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meleeka

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I also know exactly what it’s like to wake up feeling cranky and bloated, wanting nothing more than to spend all day in bed with a good book and a bucket of chocolate, and still have to put on my high heels and bra and smile at the people at work.

So for me, I appreciate that my girls may not always be in a fabulous mood, and I don’t expect absolute consistency in their headspace, but I do expect them to put on their bra and heels, and go to work.
I love this! Very well put 😀
 

scats

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If this mare is letting you interact with her safely with a head collar on, then that is what you need to do for the foreseeable.
It’s not going to take up too much of your time and will hopefully allow you both to get to know each other without resorting to smacking her or her feeling defensive and trying to kick or bite you. A month isn’t long at all and some mares can be very sensitive.

The mindset of ‘needing to show her who is boss’ will only get you into a sticky situation and give your mare more reason to be defensive around you. Try not to forget that a mare is entire and can be governed very strongly by hormones.

I would deal with her calmly and quietly with a head collar and lead rope on when you need to do anything. Don’t make it a big issue and she will begin to see that you are not there to frighten or scare her and over time she will hopefully learn to trust you a bit more on the ground.
 
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sport horse

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Remeber the old saying 'you can tell a gelding, ask a mare and discuss it with a stallion'. Maybe you should have a gelding?

'If the horse is doing what you want in the ridden sense what it does in its spare time is its own business' was a comment I heard from a top sport horse dealer.

I personally would never do anything to a loose horse in a field - a recipe for disaster and totally unsafe.

In the stable either put a headcollar on or to feed just push the bowl through a partly open door and get out of the way! Let the horse eat in peace.
 
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Do I live in a weird parallel universe? Even Lady G's description of a 'typical mare' does not describe mine.

My grey loves being centre of attention all the time for hours. Fuss and groom away for as long as you can stand it, personal space? I don't get any when she's around. CM is a bit quieter and is stand-offish with strangers, but once she knows you she's a total sweetheart. My old TB was also an absolute darling and had a wonderful, affectionate temperament.

Discipline? What's that? (ETA - I suppose I mean the association of discipline with force) I correct undesirable behaviour and praise good behaviour. They soon try to get things right and indeed get things right when I mess up and roll their eyes at the silly human.

Girthy? No not at all even when in season. If one was girthy I would know that something was wrong even if it was just my mistake catching skin when doing the girth up or maybe something bigger.

CM is boss and she flicks an ear and they fall into line. The grey was a bit narked with the gelding when he first arrived but it quickly passed and they are best buddies. If he nips her bum she will wave a leg or pull a face at him, but frankly he deserves it.


I think we need to stop being so sexist and treat horses as individuals. Most horses are extremely biddable by nature, so unless a human messes them up, you have an animal that is ready and willing to learn.
 

stormox

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Sometimes you have to work wirh horses and meet them halfway rather than being totally dominant. I would just put a headcollar on her before you do anything - simples!! And its never a good idea to try and adjust rugs in the field without having hold of their head anyway- ive known 2 people get kicked by old stagers theyve had years like this!
 

milliepops

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Do I live in a weird parallel universe? Even Lady G's description of a 'typical mare' does not describe mine.

My grey loves being centre of attention all the time for hours. Fuss and groom away for as long as you can stand it, personal space? I don't get any when she's around. CM is a bit quieter and is stand-offish with strangers, but once she knows you she's a total sweetheart. My old TB was also an absolute darling and had a wonderful, affectionate temperament.

Discipline? What's that? (ETA - I suppose I mean the association of discipline with force) I correct undesirable behaviour and praise good behaviour. They soon try to get things right and indeed get things right when I mess up and roll their eyes at the silly human.

Girthy? No not at all even when in season. If one was girthy I would know that something was wrong even if it was just my mistake catching skin when doing the girth up or maybe something bigger.

CM is boss and she flicks an ear and they fall into line. The grey was a bit narked with the gelding when he first arrived but it quickly passed and they are best buddies. If he nips her bum she will wave a leg or pull a face at him, but frankly he deserves it.


I think we need to stop being so sexist and treat horses as individuals. Most horses are extremely biddable by nature, so unless a human messes them up, you have an animal that is ready and willing to learn.
Totally agree :)
I have 4 mares at the mo and none of them fit the "typical mare" descriptions on this thread or others. They are all different, all have their own *normal* in terms of flirtiness, hormones, whether they enjoy cuddles or prefer their own space, none are aggressive or moody or girthy unless there is something wrong with them that needs attention. All of them have been willing partners and highly rewarding to have around.

I also agree with a previous poster that if the OP's reaction to undesirable behaviour is to start yelling or hitting the horse then a gelding is not deserving of that either. Time to take a bit of time out and learn how to train horses in a constructive way :)
 
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Remeber the old saying 'you can tell a gelding, ask a mare and discuss it with a stallion'. Maybe you should have a gelding?

'If the horse is doing what you want in the ridden sense what it does in its spare time is its own business' was a comment I heard from a top sport horse dealer.

I personally would never do anything to a loose horse in a field - a recipe for disaster and totally unsafe.

In the stable either put a headcollar on or to feed just push the bowl through a partly open door and get out of the way! Let the horse eat in peace.
tbh a lot of geldings would not put up with an aggressive owner particularly a native, and no equine should have to put up with it and OP, you may not think so but to this horse you are being aggressive. Labels such as 'typical mare' (whatever that is, I don't own mares but deal with some regularly and they are all lovely) are not helpful-this is a horse in a strange place, with strange people handling her and strange horses. It can take a while to strike up a true partnership with a horse especially as a one horse owner, it took me a year to get a handle on the current one.

basic safety-put a head collar on her -I've seen some horses scared, people kicked and rugs ruined due to people putting on/taking off rugs loose in the field. Many might get away with it but its lazy handling especially with a horse that you know is better with a head collar. Likewise in her box when grooming etc-tie her up, maybe she's always been tied up to handle and anything else is unsettling her right now.

Let her eat in peace-some horses are fine with being handled when eating, others are not-would you want someone fiddling with your feet/jacket when trying to eat your dinner?

Why are you randomly asking her to back up-what does she get out of it? why should she do it? initiating contact in this way is quite full on in horse body language, she doesn't know you yet-make interactions nice for her.

You say she's fab ridden, thats great and something not everyone gets straight away with a new horse-appreciate that and enjoy it. work the rest out but don't demonise her for getting it wrong, ask how you might be getting it wrong and set her up for success.
 

LadyGascoyne

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Do I live in a weird parallel universe? Even Lady G's description of a 'typical mare' does not describe mine.

My grey loves being centre of attention all the time for hours. Fuss and groom away for as long as you can stand it, personal space? I don't get any when she's around. CM is a bit quieter and is stand-offish with strangers, but once she knows you she's a total sweetheart. My old TB was also an absolute darling and had a wonderful, affectionate temperament.

Discipline? What's that? (ETA - I suppose I mean the association of discipline with force) I correct undesirable behaviour and praise good behaviour. They soon try to get things right and indeed get things right when I mess up and roll their eyes at the silly human.

Girthy? No not at all even when in season. If one was girthy I would know that something was wrong even if it was just my mistake catching skin when doing the girth up or maybe something bigger.

CM is boss and she flicks an ear and they fall into line. The grey was a bit narked with the gelding when he first arrived but it quickly passed and they are best buddies. If he nips her bum she will wave a leg or pull a face at him, but frankly he deserves it.


I think we need to stop being so sexist and treat horses as individuals. Most horses are extremely biddable by nature, so unless a human messes them up, you have an animal that is ready and willing to learn.
I am with you on the individuals- I only meant that if she’s attributing behaviors to the concept of “typical mare” then I’d suggest that whilst there are things there that fall into the stereotype, a lot of what is described is way outside of that and is firmly in the camp of behavioral issue or pain response.

Mine have all been lovely, easy and very affectionate, bar one who was a charming nutter, but I do think they differ from geldings in that there is a definite hormonal component and they do prefer negotiation to being dictated to.
 
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