Hunting terms for beginners

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**Please feel free to add useful hunting terms to this thread** HHO Admin
Although not into hunting myself I have noticed the so far exclusion of the term " BLOODING". If any of our hunting friends coukld explain I am sure it would benefit the beginners :confused:
 
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Although not into hunting myself I have noticed the so far exclusion of the term " BLOODING". If any of our hunting friends coukld explain I am sure it would benefit the beginners :confused:
Blooding is an ancient ceremony rooted in rituals relating to the respect of the animal that was killed. It involves daubing blood from the quarry animal on the cheeks or forehead. However it is a practice that has long since fallen by the wayside on the hunting field, although those that stalk their first deer are still routinely blooded.
 
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you are trying to wind the clock again i feel! why are you confused? you i think know full well the meaning of the term "blooding"- lets hear your explanation.
I merely pointed to the exclusion of a word very clearly asscociated with hunting that had for some reason been left out of an otherwise pretty complete list. Someone has now explained it clearly.
 
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[/quote]Blooding is an ancient ceremony rooted in rituals relating to the respect of the animal that was killed. It involves daubing blood from the quarry animal on the cheeks or forehead. However it is a practice that has long since fallen by the wayside on the hunting field, although those that stalk their first deer are still routinely blooded. [/quote]

A little like a recently 'banned', fox hunting tradition of blooding (often of the children), no doubt.
 
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Blooding is an ancient ceremony rooted in rituals relating to the respect of the animal that was killed. It involves daubing blood from the quarry animal on the cheeks or forehead. However it is a practice that has long since fallen by the wayside on the hunting field, although those that stalk their first deer are still routinely blooded. [/quote]

A little like a recently 'banned', fox hunting tradition of blooding (often of the children), no doubt. [/quote]

I'm not quite sure what you are driving at with this sentence. Hunting continues in a form as allowed by the Hunting Act 2004 utilising exemptions set out within it, very dull but worthwhile reading. There is a copy on my shelf, perhaps you should invest in one.

In the past I believe it was children or those at their first kill that would have been blooded, but for various reasons it has now been abandoned, although some packs may still retain the practise. I can't really see people wanting to have the master's sock soaked in fox piss or eau de boiled fox wiped across their face following a successful trail hunt!!
 

HughR92

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Blooding is an ancient ceremony rooted in rituals relating to the respect of the animal that was killed. It involves daubing blood from the quarry animal on the cheeks or forehead. However it is a practice that has long since fallen by the wayside on the hunting field, although those that stalk their first deer are still routinely blooded.
A little like a recently 'banned', fox hunting tradition of blooding (often of the children), no doubt. [/quote]

I'm not quite sure what you are driving at with this sentence. Hunting continues in a form as allowed by the Hunting Act 2004 utilising exemptions set out within it, very dull but worthwhile reading. There is a copy on my shelf, perhaps you should invest in one.

In the past I believe it was children or those at their first kill that would have been blooded, but for various reasons it has now been abandoned, although some packs may still retain the practise. I can't really see people wanting to have the master's sock soaked in fox piss or eau de boiled fox wiped across their face following a successful trail hunt!! [/quote]


Most Hunts that I know of still blooded right up to the ban,
although i can imagine some bratty kids screaming thier heads off because of it! :p
 

k9h

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All On - All hounds present and correct, the most welcome words that a whipper in can ever hear on the hunting field, particularly at the end of the day!
Technically they are the best words a whipper-in can SAY! ;) :p
 
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All On - All hounds present and correct, the most welcome words that a whipper in can ever hear on the hunting field, particularly at the end of the day!
Technically they are the best words a whipper-in can SAY! ;) :p
Ahh but when you are a humble second whipper-in crashing about in undergrowth and river trying to find that missing half couple and you hear the first whipper in yell 'all on' it is the sweetest sentence in the English language. :cool:
 
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As a matter of courtesy, when you have had enough hunting for the day, you should ride up to the huntsman and say something like: "Well done for keeping your dogs barking, I could tell they were happy because they keep wagging their tails". The huntsman will remember your kind words and give special treatment next time you hunt.
Hounds dont bark - they speak and they dont have tails, they have sterns!
 
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As a matter of courtesy, when you have had enough hunting for the day, you should ride up to the huntsman and say something like: "Well done for keeping your dogs barking, I could tell they were happy because they keep wagging their tails". The huntsman will remember your kind words and give special treatment next time you hunt.
Hounds dont bark - they speak and they dont have tails, they have sterns!
Forgot to add - they wave their sterns, not wag.
 
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My friends son is to be an amateur whip this year Are there any books leaflets about what is expected of him and the protocol for whipping in. I have the Duke of Beaufort book James wants to get it right!!! and he is really keen . He has hunted for 3 seasons and now wants to more involved.
 
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*Hound on the left/right* - to be shouted/heeded when a spare hound (or more than one!) comes through the field from behind - get your horse out of the way and let it pass!

*Good Evening* What you bid your fieldmaster, Hunt sec and fellow hunters, foot followers, whoever (!) when you leave, regardless of the time of day

If you see someone with their hand behind their back when you are, for example, lining up to pass through a narrow space, they are alerting you to the fact their horse may kick

* 'ware* simply means BEWARE!
Never Good evening - always Good NIGHT. Even at 11am after AH.
If some-one has their hand behind their back with the palm facing outwards and fingers splayed, it means they are slowing down. This warns any half-wits not to cannon into your ned's rear end at Mach 9. Horses which kick should have their mannners sorted at home BEFORE venturing forth. Alternatively, wear a Red Ribbon and keep at the back, out of the way. If wearing a Red Ribbon, do not expect other people to avoid you - you should be avoiding them. A Green Ribbon denotes a young horse - treat with respect.
 
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As a new member I am sorry to say that there are only a small number or terms/calls listed and some are incorrect.
'Good evening'.......NEVER, Good NIght........Yes.

You will never learn all from a site as many are not known by even the hunt staff today, so you will have to ask the "old farts" brigade, which includes myself.

Sorry to be a misreable old git!
You are not a MOG. You most probably think as do I and many other members of the OFB - that the hunting field is the last bastion of courtesy to be found in this mannerless and lawless country. Do, please, let us keep it that way. Bring back the "good old days", when Masters actually had the courage to send people home for behaving badly!
 
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**Please feel free to add useful hunting terms to this thread** HHO Admin
Although not into hunting myself I have noticed the so far exclusion of the term " BLOODING". If any of our hunting friends coukld explain I am sure it would benefit the beginners :confused:
You are, very obviously, "an anti".
However, I was blooded on my third time out - as a 4-year old in 1956.
Mummy tried very hard to wash it off but I was adamant that it had to stay in situ until I was ready to remove it.
If you don't approve of our traditional country ways, then move into the suburbs and buy knitting patterns to keep you occupied!! With best regards from a farmer's daughter.
 
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Thank you Mr Woof for raising some very good points.
With regard to the owners of a kicker, many of them as you state, expect you to keep out of their way and feel that they are being victimised when they are asked to remain at the rear of the field.

My placid ISH seems to attract bad tempered tail swishing kickers who are inconsiderately ridden into the centre of a group during a quick breather by someone who believes that it's the responsibility of anybody in the vicinity to remove themselves if they wish to avoid injury. The masters of yore would never allow these situations to develop, standards are falling.

An article in an earlier issue of H&H stated that when the master wishes you good morning you are to reply - "Good morning Master." and not "Good morning Henry/Phil/Edgar" or whatever.

My toes were curling when I heard the reply to the master of one hunt last year - "Alright chief? keep yer 'orse away from me though, me and my 'orse don' like being crowded!"

Fortunately the said master was a keen user of the unrefined version of "Go forth and multiply" and put the unwelcome lout in his place.
 
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A little like a recently 'banned', fox hunting tradition of blooding (often of the children), no doubt.
I'm not quite sure what you are driving at with this sentence. Hunting continues in a form as allowed by the Hunting Act 2004 utilising exemptions set out within it, very dull but worthwhile reading. There is a copy on my shelf, perhaps you should invest in one.

In the past I believe it was children or those at their first kill that would have been blooded, but for various reasons it has now been abandoned, although some packs may still retain the practise. I can't really see people wanting to have the master's sock soaked in fox piss or eau de boiled fox wiped across their face following a successful trail hunt!! [/quote]


Most Hunts that I know of still blooded right up to the ban,
although i can imagine some bratty kids screaming thier heads off because of it! :p[/QUOTE]


ahhhh a little bit of vermin blood never did anyone any harm ;)
 

Scratchline

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I'm not quite sure what you are driving at with this sentence. Hunting continues in a form as allowed by the Hunting Act 2004 utilising exemptions set out within it, very dull but worthwhile reading. There is a copy on my shelf, perhaps you should invest in one.

In the past I believe it was children or those at their first kill that would have been blooded, but for various reasons it has now been abandoned, although some packs may still retain the practise. I can't really see people wanting to have the master's sock soaked in fox piss or eau de boiled fox wiped across their face following a successful trail hunt!!

Most Hunts that I know of still blooded right up to the ban,
although i can imagine some bratty kids screaming thier heads off because of it! :p[/QUOTE]


ahhhh a little bit of vermin blood never did anyone any harm ;)[/QUOTE]

With the fast growing lungworm problem in our fox population you carry on lol
 
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An article in an earlier issue of H&H stated that when the master wishes you good morning you are to reply - "Good morning Master." and not "Good morning Henry/Phil/Edgar" or whatever.

My toes were curling when I heard the reply to the master of one hunt last year - "Alright chief? keep yer 'orse away from me though, me and my 'orse don' like being crowded!"

Fortunately the said master was a keen user of the unrefined version of "Go forth and multiply" and put the unwelcome lout in his place.
That really made me ROFL :D

How big do the ribbons have to be? I have some green electrical tape for my mares first season but not sure how many strands to put in! Would an inch wide be enough :confused:
 
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As a matter of courtesy, when you have had enough hunting for the day, you should ride up to the huntsman and say something like: "Well done for keeping your dogs barking, I could tell they were happy because they keep wagging their tails". The huntsman will remember your kind words and give special treatment next time you hunt.

I thought calling them dogs was a sin :confused: lol
 

luvbvb

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next year is going to be the first time that i go hunting, my 5 year old mear has has already gone but i'm just wondering what people thought of it after they went :)
 
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So Whos bLIARite (WRONG)

I was Told to Never Shout There Goes the Little Brown Bugge*.

When I was was Blooded I was Told Not to Wash it off till it was Dark I let it Wear off and still had some on my Face when returning to School on Monday:D:D
 
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