I just bought my first cob! Introduction + feed advice + photos!

angel7

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I do love reading all about Rigsby and his joy of life. I really enjoy learning about your training methods and seeing the tremendous improvements in him.

However I feel like the big baddie here but I honestly feel he is too lean now...
He appears to have dips on either side of the tailhead, and between the hip and point of the buttocks. Even his head to me is looking boney and he is aging before our eyes. The top of the croup looks very prodruding now. Perhaps the gut problems are because he needs a bit more going through him.
I dont want to be the person to say this especially if you are fragile at the moment. Sometimes when you see them everyday you dont notice.
Feel free to ignore me. I know we are used to seeing obese things waddling everywhere and I commend the care you give him, but I just feel I have to put it out there.
 

Red-1

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I do love reading all about Rigsby and his joy of life. I really enjoy learning about your training methods and seeing the tremendous improvements in him.

However I feel like the big baddie here but I honestly feel he is too lean now...
He appears to have dips on either side of the tailhead, and between the hip and point of the buttocks. Even his head to me is looking boney and he is aging before our eyes. The top of the croup looks very prodruding now. Perhaps the gut problems are because he needs a bit more going through him.
I dont want to be the person to say this especially if you are fragile at the moment. Sometimes when you see them everyday you dont notice.
Feel free to ignore me. I know we are used to seeing obese things waddling everywhere and I commend the care you give him, but I just feel I have to put it out there.
I don't mind at all, the vet and I have had discussions, she wants him leaner, I want him fatter. We came to an arrangement where he is, to me, too lean at the moment, while the grass is so lush. Once the summer has dried up, he can go fatter.

I weigh tape every week, he is only changing by an inch or so.

That is the pay off. He can be a bit fatter and on a dry lot, soaked hay. Or, be slimmer and on some grass. He currently has been upped to 2 hours morning and 2 hours afternoon at grass. He loves his grass time. Still on 10kg soaked hay daily, by weight, which will be a bit less due to the weight of the hay nets, but it is what he has been on for a while.

I think saying he is ageing before our eyes is a bit dramatic. The sore guts coincided with the introduction of lush grass (that is all we have) from when the weather went from baking dry to wet/sunny. It grew exponentially, even though we cut it every week. I did start the summer with 15 minutes for a couple of days, then 30 for a week, then up-scaling incrementally, but when it went from dry to wet, the growth meant he suddenly had an up-scale in grass eating. He wears a muzzle.

He also has time turned out in a dry lot area.

I have pointed out the hollows to the vet, but at the same time he has small fat pads on hs shoulders. She insists he must be slim enough that they disappear, even though the hollows are then visible. That is how his blood results lost the EMS components, and also his cushings score dropped to normal. She also told me that he is still to be considered and treated as EMS. I can only go on vets recommendation. He has to be slim. I don't like it. But it is better than suppering the horrible pain of laminitis, which he was just finishing box rest for when I bought him.
 
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Red-1

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I do love reading all about Rigsby and his joy of life. I really enjoy learning about your training methods and seeing the tremendous improvements in him.

However I feel like the big baddie here but I honestly feel he is too lean now...
He appears to have dips on either side of the tailhead, and between the hip and point of the buttocks. Even his head to me is looking boney and he is aging before our eyes. The top of the croup looks very prodruding now. Perhaps the gut problems are because he needs a bit more going through him.
I dont want to be the person to say this especially if you are fragile at the moment. Sometimes when you see them everyday you dont notice.
Feel free to ignore me. I know we are used to seeing obese things waddling everywhere and I commend the care you give him, but I just feel I have to put it out there.
I used to be really careful which angles I used for photos, as I know he has to be lean. I was remiss in just ticking photos up!

Anyway, in case you think I am starving Rigsby, I just popped out to take some photos.

These are they.


The vet would prefer he didn't have this shaped bum, but I have negotiated that he doesn't have to lose any more.
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A well fleshed back... no spine...

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A side view, but bear in mind he has a dipped back all the time, and he HAS to show some ribs. He had just come off long term box rest when he came, and hasn't been in much work. This is how the vet wants him!
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The vet would prefer more indentation here, but he has one!

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Backside, outside..

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Looking down the offside, just as the vet ordered! (well, fatter than the vet wanted, but a negotiated compromise).
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Looking down the nearside, that stubborn fat pad!
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Fat pad from the other direction...
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Looking down his back to the peachy bum the other way...

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I took photos both inside and out, so you could have good views. The inside ones showed up better.

Personally, I don't know how much better condition I can get him in, being as he is metabolically compromised?

I didn't just rely on the weigh tape as I also paid for the mobile weigh bridge, so we could compare the weigh tape to the weigh bridge. I keep the weigh tape as 400kg MAX, but on that the weigh bridge says he is 450KG, approx.

Again, I don't mind anyone having a view, but found it a touch dramatic that you thought he was ageing before our eyes. I hope these photos, taken today, help to out your mind at rest.
 
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Red-1

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he looks fine to me, i think the angles created by his withers and pelvis make him look lighter than he is. the important thing is that he is happy and healthy :)
That was also the vet's point of view. Hence also weigh taping weekly.

I would much prefer him fatter, not least because I feel too big on him and wouldn't if he were bigger...but he is metabolically compromised, so can't be taken by the norms of other horses.

Also, I was 11 stone myself when I bought him. I am now 9st 4lbs, you can see my ribs too! I sometimes have to remind myself that my ribs, although visible, don't hurt! I feel stronger and fitter than I have done for years. The funny thing is, no one ever told me I was too fat, even when I strayed into the 'obese' category, but when I lost weight people have frequently told me that I am too skinny. One way was unhealthy and harmful to my health, had me feeling bad. The other way is healthy and has me feeling well and energetic, yet people criticise. It seems that 'fat shaming' in people is OUT, yet skinny shaming is still somehow acceptable. I am talking in people here.
 

CanteringCarrot

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he looks fine to me, i think the angles created by his withers and pelvis make him look lighter than he is. the important thing is that he is happy and healthy :)
I thought this too. Part of it is just his conformation.

I think the OP has reached a good compromise here with the vet and with the horse, in that he gets to enjoy some grass time while still being healthy for a metabolically compromised horse.
 

Red-1

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Personally I am in awe of what you have achieved with a very compromised horse and I think he looks great and a credit to you.
Thank you. I can't claim all the credit, the previous owner had followed vets instructions to the letter when he became ill, he was almost down to this weight before I bought him. He had just come sound too. He was only ill in the first place because of the strain of Covid on routines and due to other circumstances. He has always been a happy, healthy hacking chap before that.

It was a risk buying him, his feet weren't strong, they were compromised in shape, his bloods were not good, but the start of his new regime was in place. I have spoken with his previous vet and have had two separate vets to him here, and they are all agreed in what measures we have in place, so I will go by whet the vets say.

I give myself credit too, that as soon as I realised he wasn't happy last month, I re-evaluated. He was sound, was performing everything I asked, but it wasn't as joyful. I just though I was over asking, so lightened up. I guess a lot of people would then have simply chucked him out in a field, but I know that would be wrong, and I want him comfortable even in retirement, so had Fiona out to see him, and she suggested a gut supplement. I wasn't expecting that to have such a dramatic effect, as he wasn't showing any classic ulcer type symptoms.

The supplement is expensive, but if it helps, he can have it. He is on a restricted diet, but we have mixed it up so he has hay 4 times a day, night with straw in a net too, two separate grazing sessions, up to 2 hours each, to spread the cheer but also spread the sugars. Also two short feeds, not big, mostly roughage, but for added interest. It all helps to keep food on the go. He is back in work, he is enjoying that. With all this attention, I seem to spend a fair proportion of my day seeing Rigsby, but that is OK, he is a champ.
 

Red-1

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If anyone else is struggling with Mallenders, the suggestion to give vitamin D seems to have been a hit. I did read up on it after it was suggested, and also consult the vet and agree a dosage.

This is today, not even treated them for a week!

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Oh, plus the cracked coronets would seem to have been the same, as when his skin cleared up, so did his coronets! I will also add a sole shot, really pleased with his feet. They still grow too much periople, but that can be cleared when they are wet. Or left. It doesn't seem to do any harm. Feet shots were yesterday, when I took photos of his condition, so before he was clipped out again. The soles are mottled from walking on gravel.

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DizzyDoughnut

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He's looking amazing and his feet are looking great! I love reading your updates!

Stupid question about vitamin d, but my borrowed, now semi permanent resident cob has mallenders, where can I find out more about vitamin d? Do you just use human vitamin d pills or is there a horse version?

I'm a cob newbie and after spending ages trying to wash his masses of feather today and actually get to the scabby areas I've admitted defeat and will be clipping them off this week to hopefully make him more comfortable.
 

Red-1

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He's looking amazing and his feet are looking great! I love reading your updates!

Stupid question about vitamin d, but my borrowed, now semi permanent resident cob has mallenders, where can I find out more about vitamin d? Do you just use human vitamin d pills or is there a horse version?

I'm a cob newbie and after spending ages trying to wash his masses of feather today and actually get to the scabby areas I've admitted defeat and will be clipping them off this week to hopefully make him more comfortable.
It was suggested to me, and I googled it Vitamin D for horses or equines, and found a research paper. I showed my vet, and she said she hadn't heard of it being given, but could see why it may be needed, she thought it was interesting. The article gave a dosage, but I gave less than that, he had 10,000 iu a day. The mallenders was a lot better anyway, only a couple of stubborn areas, but after vet d supplementation, they too cleared up.

I can see why it is necessary, we rug them up in winter, he is black with a thick coat anyway, and as soon as the flies come out, he is in a fly rug, as soon as it is hot, he is in during the day and out at night!

As he wasn't on grass for almost a year, he also had vitamin E, and a general supplement. He also has salt and magnesium now, as both are said to be protective against laminitis. None of the things are at a huge dose, and I do make sure I am not doubling up o anything that can be harmful, such as selenium.

I would do some research and then ask your vet though. I always think that is fair, as if it all goes wrong, you would expect your vet to make it all Ok again!

Oh, and yes, I use my pills, plus the vitamin e supplement he is on is also linseed based, as vitamin D is a fat soluble one, not water.
 

DizzyDoughnut

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Thank you! I'm not sure if vitamin d would be a problem, he's turned out 24/7 but he arrived fat so he is on a diet now. I'll clip his legs so I can actually see what's going on under them and do some googling then I'll ring my vet. I haven't seen him for at least a month, he's bound to be missing my random ideas and questions by now. 🀣
 

Red-1

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Thank you! I'm not sure if vitamin d would be a problem, he's turned out 24/7 but he arrived fat so he is on a diet now. I'll clip his legs so I can actually see what's going on under them and do some googling then I'll ring my vet. I haven't seen him for at least a month, he's bound to be missing my random ideas and questions by now. 🀣
The difficulty is that there isn't a recommended blood level of vitamin d for horses, as far as my vet knew, so you can't do a blood test, as you would in humans. In our case, it was just that his management, rugging etc would lead to not much sun exposure, plus he is on soaked hay.

The other things that have worked with Mallenders is clipping short all of the time (twice a week, initially), weekly wash with T Gel, twice daily massage with plain pig oil (proper massage, not just rubbing it in). As it got better, the management became less time consuming.

This photo was taken when he has been scaled back to being washed with normal shampoo (the black one, cos it makes him gleam :D) once every 3 weeks, clipped once a week, oiled whenever it looks like there may be build up, but that hasn't been for over a week.

There are still some bald bits that sometimes have dandruff, but the skin is damaged and I expect this is as good as it will get.

The skin is a lot less thick, I think because of the constant clipping and oiling has diminished any mites. He never did stamp, but has CPL, so has mites and thick skin. I also used Trinity Consultants' L94 a couple of times, his legs used to swell due to the CPL, and this learned it up and seemed to help his lymphatic system function better. I can't remember the last time his legs swelled up. I was trimming very short too, it was gross to start with, the clippers were taking loads of shed skin off as well as hair.

Initially he was difficult to clip, I had to wash first and oil/massage to loosen the scabs as they obviously hurt to clip. I also used ++ training to allow the clippers on, he has apparently always been awkward to clip. He stands for it now though, as the skin is intact and he is cool with it all.
 

DizzyDoughnut

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The difficulty is that there isn't a recommended blood level of vitamin d for horses, as far as my vet knew, so you can't do a blood test, as you would in humans. In our case, it was just that his management, rugging etc would lead to not much sun exposure, plus he is on soaked hay.

The other things that have worked with Mallenders is clipping short all of the time (twice a week, initially), weekly wash with T Gel, twice daily massage with plain pig oil (proper massage, not just rubbing it in). As it got better, the management became less time consuming.

This photo was taken when he has been scaled back to being washed with normal shampoo (the black one, cos it makes him gleam :D) once every 3 weeks, clipped once a week, oiled whenever it looks like there may be build up, but that hasn't been for over a week.

There are still some bald bits that sometimes have dandruff, but the skin is damaged and I expect this is as good as it will get.

The skin is a lot less thick, I think because of the constant clipping and oiling has diminished any mites. He never did stamp, but has CPL, so has mites and thick skin. I also used Trinity Consultants' L94 a couple of times, his legs used to swell due to the CPL, and this learned it up and seemed to help his lymphatic system function better. I can't remember the last time his legs swelled up. I was trimming very short too, it was gross to start with, the clippers were taking loads of shed skin off as well as hair.

Initially he was difficult to clip, I had to wash first and oil/massage to loosen the scabs as they obviously hurt to clip. I also used ++ training to allow the clippers on, he has apparently always been awkward to clip. He stands for it now though, as the skin is intact and he is cool with it all.
He was so lucky to find you!

I've been and stocked up on pig oil and shampoo and I've rooted out my clippers, just waiting to get the blades back from being sharpened. So far he's been an absolute saint, even when he's unsure he stands like a rock and just huffs slightly and looks a bit worried. The only thing he has objected to was holding one front leg up for the farrier, I think because the scabby backs of his knees made it uncomfortable, and even then he put his foot back down as gently as he could while still making his point that he didn't like it. Other than his high maintenance legs he seems very healthy considering his age. I've got to admit I'd quite like him to go from semi-permanent resident cob to permanent resident, he's just so nice to have around.
 

Red-1

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He was so lucky to find you!

I've been and stocked up on pig oil and shampoo and I've rooted out my clippers, just waiting to get the blades back from being sharpened. So far he's been an absolute saint, even when he's unsure he stands like a rock and just huffs slightly and looks a bit worried. The only thing he has objected to was holding one front leg up for the farrier, I think because the scabby backs of his knees made it uncomfortable, and even then he put his foot back down as gently as he could while still making his point that he didn't like it. Other than his high maintenance legs he seems very healthy considering his age. I've got to admit I'd quite like him to go from semi-permanent resident cob to permanent resident, he's just so nice to have around.
I would do a test patch for the pig oil before massaging with it, some can react, although that seems like prevalent if it is plain pig oil as opposed to pig oil and sulphur.

It sounds like yours is here to stay!
 

DizzyDoughnut

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I would do a test patch for the pig oil before massaging with it, some can react, although that seems like prevalent if it is plain pig oil as opposed to pig oil and sulphur.

It sounds like yours is here to stay!
I'm going to patch test once I've clipped, I'm worried if I do it before I might not be able to actually see if causes a reaction under all the feathers! I really hope he does stay, he's just brilliant and it turns out he's a calming influence on my other one so everyone's happy! Definitely got lucky when I asked to borrow a horse and he was the one that came to stay!
 

PapaverFollis

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Definitely patch test pig oil! Took the hair and top layer of skin off my lad with plain pig oil! Thought it would be fine without sulphur....Ooops. It got rid of the mallenders... briefly. It came back with the hair but his isn't bad anyway. I might talk to my vet about vitamin D. Given where we are the doctors have reminded me to take it myself every time I've been in. So it might be a thing for the horses here too.

I don't comment much Red but I love your updates on Rigsby. ❀
 

Red-1

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And tonight, there was Rigsby.

Today, some of mum's money came though.

I know it should be nice, it is a gift from mum, but, TBH it is all just a bit... final.
I feel a bit churlish to say, I don't want the money, I want my mum.

I always said I couldn't relax and grieve until it is all done, and it is not. Still have lots to do, some days it still seems insurmountable. I certainly don't think I will be using the same solicitor for the rest! But today, some was done. Money came into my account... and... some went out again.

I have made donations to the Red Cross, to Age UK and to Dementia UK.

Mum always liked the Red Cross, said they were often the first into a needy area, as she said, "They aren't afraid to get their hands dirty."

The other two are my choice.

Age UK helped me, ostensibly to fill a form in, but they also helped me put things into perspective and signposted me to more help, when no help was being forthcoming.

Dementia UK runs Admiral nurses. I had an Admiral Nurse assigned, she was going to organise a volunteer to come and visit mum in her independent living flat. It never happened, she went into a care home before it could be organised and Admiral Nurses can't help once you are in a home. Their involvement was short lived, but much appreciated nonetheless.

Rigsby? I did him late, I was sorting 'stuff' (see above) and he was cross. He doesn't like things being delayed. I tried trimming his back feet. He snatched, I told him off, he squealed.

Yes, Rigsby told me that I was in a poor state to be trimming.

Rigsby is very fair, and I know he was right. Today Rigsby wasn't worked, today I went inside without riding. Tonight, my lovely, friendly, fuzzy faced cob told me to take a chill pill.

Tonight will be another candelabra night. I need a proper table meal. Connect and breathe. We will raise a glass to mum.
 
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Red-1

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I'm sorry you're hurting, Red. Thank goodness for Rigsby! And please give yourself credit for always listening to what he is trying to tell you. Be kind to yourself xx
Thank you. I felt a bit guilty for.... I'm not sure. Not riding? Not being on top form?

But then, I reminded myself that this is the exact reason I sold the posh horse and bought Riggers. He doesn't care one way or the other about riding. He is one of those you can leave for weeks and climb aboard. Happy to be ridden, happy to not be ridden. As long as he has food at regular intervals around the day. As long as he is treated fairly.

Rigsby is a one off. He is ace!

I even like that he tells me off when he perceives I have fallen short of his expectations :p
 

Red-1

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With 'stuff' going on, I haven't ridden for almost a week. Rigsby doesn't care one way or the other, some horses get hyped up when not in work, Rigsby is the same, day in, day out...

Today, I fancied a ride!

It started with the Tesco van squeezing by, Rigsby was cool. We went down the side road, popped back out on the main road, and there was the Tesco van again, being emptied. Only... just as I sterted to overtake him on his offside, the man slammed the roller shutter door on the nearside.
I did wonder what Riggers would do, as it was out of his sight and very noisy, but, he kept on plodding


Next up, an oncoming tractor. Rigsby isn't keen, so I usually tuck him into a gateway or something, but we were at the part of the village where there are 4 consecutive wrought iron gates with spikes on top
so tucking in wasn't sensible. It was coming, so I decided the next best thing would be to trot at it, so he could feel bold. Yes, good boy trotted right up to it, as it rumbled at and past us


Rigsby was really enjoying his ride out, striding out and feeling cheerful, so I decided to take him further, somewhere new. He examined the pub, the bus stop, a fountain in someone's garden, all without breaking step.

Next... two motorbikes from behind. They were going 30, the speed limit, and Riggers didn't turn an ear. Just strode on, master of all he surveyed.

He passed horses, no problems, and we went onto the overgrown track. He liked that, he could snatch grass


Then... the hard core track. This is a tester for Rigsby. It is safer for him to remain barefoot so we can keep a better track of his lami (not that he has that now, but once they have had it once, they are prone). Baked hard underneath, big stones over, there is no surface more challenging to a barefoot, metabolically compromised horse, I don't think. He strode through. If I were being hyper critical, one foot is landing slightly flat, but that is the hoof geek in me.

Rigsby stole some grass
.

Back home, he had got sweaty armpits, so he had a shower. He played with the water, I got wet/

Laughter is better than celerybrations.

Happy Rigsby, happy me.

Some photos in case anyone wants a vicarious hack!

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Red-1

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A little play with Rigsby in the field. Improving his tractor type tolerance.
Started sensibly at walk but it wasn't long before I was ye-ha-ing around like a little kid :p

There was hair flying everywhere...

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Then, full bath time. He is learning to really love the hose!

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Such a handsome horse!

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Super day. with a horse who is proving to be worth his weight in gold!

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SatansLittleHelper

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Red, so sorry you've had such a rough time with losing your Mum, and all of the subsequent issues. It's a long slog and I think it can take the edge off grief until there is nothing left to do. It's lovely that you have made some donations in your Mum's memory 😊 I hope you can finally get a little peace xx
As for Rigsby, isn't he just such a dude 😍😍😍 I can't believe how far he has come with you, even if his previous owners did get the ball rolling..he's flourishing ❀❀
 

Red-1

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Love Rigsby updates, he sounds such fun!
He is! I mean, when he arrived I did wonder what I had done, as he was a little bullish o_O:p but now, he is gentlemanly. He was always kind, but was simply rude (at least I fond him so!). Now, he is ace. he has learned to wait for stuff, be patient and just stand still and chill!

It’s so lovely to see your updates, he’s such a lovely boy. You must be so thrilled you found each other. πŸ™‚
I think I have been very lucky. Especially when you consider my buying criteria! I simply went out to buy the most broken horse I could find, that was the right size and had potential to make a ridden horse, even though I really just wanted a companion, so it was fine if he wasn't a ridden horse.

I needed a project, and taking care of one that was compromised was perfect. Loads of in-hand walking, no stress.

I do want to get back to competing though, and don't think Riggers is that horse. But then, each time I think I am ready to get another, more mum stuff happens and I feel over stretched, here Rigsby comes into his own. He tells me if I fall short of expectations, yet is happy to ride, not ride, whatever.

I am looking at adverts, have booked to see a couple that were then cancelled, will buy now if the right one comes up, even if I don't then do that much with the new one for a while. I have enough land to keep an extra one without worry, I can start bits as and when.

Red, so sorry you've had such a rough time with losing your Mum, and all of the subsequent issues. It's a long slog and I think it can take the edge off grief until there is nothing left to do. It's lovely that you have made some donations in your Mum's memory 😊 I hope you can finally get a little peace xx
As for Rigsby, isn't he just such a dude 😍😍😍 I can't believe how far he has come with you, even if his previous owners did get the ball rolling..he's flourishing ❀❀
I know you are right about the grief. I haven't even started on that yet as I know I have to hold it all together until everything that needs doing is done. Still some to do on that front, it *should* already be done, but people blame Covid, blame the post, lose stuff, claim they never had it...

Some of mum's money has come now, which was a shock in itself. It also meant the faff of setting up new accounts etc, wrestling with new internet banking etc. If I were outside looking in, I am sure I would think that it was a 'nice' problem to have, but the money doesn't feel rightfully mine yet. I have ordered a gazebo, which will be fitted in December/January, plus the house has suffered over the past couple of years whilst we have been busy, so some stuff can be done. Only, all tradesmen are busy, our little dog Hector doesn't like visitors... so even that will bring its issues.

I haven't looked at any horses for weeks, saw 3 back then, 2 of which were nice, but none since. I keep saying that there is no rush, but I am 54, so don't have forever to go running and jumping!

Oh, if anyone is interested, I tried the Hot Horse fly spray for cleggs, expecting it to not work. While I was faffing in the field yesterday, I was inundated. This one landed on Rigsby' bottom. I took a moment to film it. To my amazement, it crawled around for a while, didn't bite, flew off o_O

My video was just like their advert! o_O

Others did latch on though, in other areas. I wonder if bum skin is tougher?

So, in the interests of science, after his bath, I watched as LOADS landed and bit. Then, I sprayed him and.... about 1/5th the number came back.

Β£20 well spent, IMO (and to my surprise)!

Photo was before his bath!

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Red-1

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7 February 2013
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Recently bought into cob culture.
Oh drat, I have been contact traced as a contact and am isolating :rolleyes:

I was upset because our little dog has been struggling and I had the physio booked for him (been to vets, who just offered pain killers) and it took months for the appointment to come, and it was cancelled.

I have managed to re-arrange for 3 weeks, which is something.

I had also arranged to go open water swimming with a friend this weekend, also cancelled :rolleyes:

Went for a little ride in the field last night, just because I felt hemmed in...

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I am well aware that my 'boat' in this 'storm' is better than many, and feel for people who have no outdoor space.
 

Red-1

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Joined
7 February 2013
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12,337
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Recently bought into cob culture.
But then, by this morning, I had pulled my socks up and realised that there are some advantages to a week of isolation.

I have felt overwhelmed with everything still left to do for mum's estate, and I have been plain busy...

too busy to play with Riggers much....

But, today I had some unexpected spare time...

So...

We had a play!!!

Today, Rigsby learned to take out the rubbish!

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After that (because he did it right first time!) we had a go at a new sport - Cob Polo!!!

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Rigsby sincerely hopes this ends up being a one day isolation (still a possibility) rather than the full 10 LOL.

Right, morning jobs done, off to sort some paperwork!
 
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SaddlePsych'D

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15 December 2019
Messages
1,159
Sorry to hear you're having to isolate Red-1, and that things with your mum's estate have been tricky, but glad to see Rigsby doing his job as always (plus his new bin-person job :D) Cob polo looks very fun!
 
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