Irish common sense - thank God!

turnbuckle

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OK.....his fields are partly sheep netted...I know, I know, but he has always been 200% sensible. Until today!

Popping out on a shopping mission, I glanced into his summer field....he was looking quite calm but then saw that when he picked up his hind it had a fence post attached.....out of car and over as quickly as calm would allow. Foot through a square and wire between shoe and hoof....all attached to a rotten strainer post and 24ft of loose netting :(

Stood totally still while I widened the gap to get the foot out, then moved off, tightening fence around my leg at which point I start to think OH DEAR. Thankfully he stopped and allowed me to wiggle the wire so it broke. Then strolls off and looks very pleased on top of 11ft near vertical bank overlooking (empty) silage yard.

I head off to get headcollar, when I scale the bank he decides now is not at all a good time to be caught. Thinks about coming down on his own but decides tractor tyre might get in the way.

I put out distress call for packet of crisps. Crisps arrive, one rustle of the pack and he slides down like he's at Hickstead.

Now safely in mini-garth, munching grass, quite sound and looking rather pleased with himself.

I think he has covered both the devil and angel bases today....multi-skilled horse!!!!! Either that or ****ing drama-llama.
 

Hallo2012

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your post is the exact reason i forced the issue of getting a massive drainage ditch and shallow pond fenced off, and all the wire removed and replaced with P&R...............OH and fencing contractor think i am insane but.....horses!!!!!

glad it all ended well :)
 

mule

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OK.....his fields are partly sheep netted...I know, I know, but he has always been 200% sensible. Until today!

Popping out on a shopping mission, I glanced into his summer field....he was looking quite calm but then saw that when he picked up his hind it had a fence post attached.....out of car and over as quickly as calm would allow. Foot through a square and wire between shoe and hoof....all attached to a rotten strainer post and 24ft of loose netting :(

Stood totally still while I widened the gap to get the foot out, then moved off, tightening fence around my leg at which point I start to think OH DEAR. Thankfully he stopped and allowed me to wiggle the wire so it broke. Then strolls off and looks very pleased on top of 11ft near vertical bank overlooking (empty) silage yard.

I head off to get headcollar, when I scale the bank he decides now is not at all a good time to be caught. Thinks about coming down on his own but decides tractor tyre might get in the way.

I put out distress call for packet of crisps. Crisps arrive, one rustle of the pack and he slides down like he's at Hickstead.

Now safely in mini-garth, munching grass, quite sound and looking rather pleased with himself.

I think he has covered both the devil and angel bases today....multi-skilled horse!!!!! Either that or ****ing drama-llama.
Sounds like he has a lot of ID in him. I love a sensible horse. There's nothing better.
 

Bernster

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Ah yes, sounds familiar. Mine was stupid enough to pull his haynet off the wall and get it stuck round his front foot, but sensible enough to just stand there eating his hay until I came to free him. Not ideal, I realise, and the only time I've ever had a horse do this, but thankfully no harm done.
 

Reacher

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My ex racer once snagged her fly rug on a gate post. Instead of panicking and destroying the rug to escape she just waited for someone to come and once she spotted mr reacher bleated at him to rescue her.
Glad your horse is ok
 

Auslander

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Ah yes, sounds familiar. Mine was stupid enough to pull his haynet off the wall and get it stuck round his front foot, but sensible enough to just stand there eating his hay until I came to free him. Not ideal, I realise, and the only time I've ever had a horse do this, but thankfully no harm done.
Your other horse has been removed from a few haynets in her time here (along with the other special little snowflake situations she's got herself into) She is very sensible about staying still and waiting to be discovered - often shouting very loudly to hurry me up!
 

Pearlsasinger

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We had only had our 1st Clydesdale mare for about 3 weeks, at livery, when she got her foot caught up in some wire. Dad drove slowly past on his way to work and watched her lift her hind hoof up and put it back down a few times in the same place. He went to investigate and, as he always carried a pocket knife for emergencies, freed her. She was a real non-panicker but we couldn't really call her sensible because she would go through anything, including stone walls to get to grass. We once had to demolish a wall round her because she was stuck with two feet either side of it. She didn't panic then either.:rolleyes:
 

turnbuckle

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Update: fence has been temporarily bodged with 2 ring feeders and a 12ft gate (classy, non? honestly, it will be fixed next week).

Horse returns to field. Reaction? "Oh NO it's CHANGED"! (The predictable horsey one).

Nope, walks up and proudly admires it like a houseowner with a flash new kitchen extension.

Truly special needs.
 

JenniD

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OK.....his fields are partly sheep netted...I know, I know, but he has always been 200% sensible. Until today!

Popping out on a shopping mission, I glanced into his summer field....he was looking quite calm but then saw that when he picked up his hind it had a fence post attached.....out of car and over as quickly as calm would allow. Foot through a square and wire between shoe and hoof....all attached to a rotten strainer post and 24ft of loose netting :(

Stood totally still while I widened the gap to get the foot out, then moved off, tightening fence around my leg at which point I start to think OH DEAR. Thankfully he stopped and allowed me to wiggle the wire so it broke. Then strolls off and looks very pleased on top of 11ft near vertical bank overlooking (empty) silage yard.

I head off to get headcollar, when I scale the bank he decides now is not at all a good time to be caught. Thinks about coming down on his own but decides tractor tyre might get in the way.

I put out distress call for packet of crisps. Crisps arrive, one rustle of the pack and he slides down like he's at Hickstead.

Now safely in mini-garth, munching grass, quite sound and looking rather pleased with himself.

I think he has covered both the devil and angel bases today....multi-skilled horse!!!!! Either that or ****ing drama-llama.
It's amazing what you can achieve with a packet of cheese and onion! Haha! Well done.
 

SEL

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Walking my horses up to their field once and I saw my friend's mare by my gate - away from the rest of the herd. Realised she had her hind leg stuck through the gate. Such a good girl - luckily I had my phone on me so called the yard for help. Brute force to free her but she was fine thankfully.

Always handy to have a rustling piece of paper in the pocket for catching those special horses!!
 

Rowreach

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At least you noticed! A friend of mine left for work one morning and saw her horse standing at the fence line. Came home ten hours later and horse was still in the same spot, ground a bit worn away. The front clip on his rug had clipped itself to the top wire 😮

I never used anything but buckle fronted rugs after hearing about it.
 

equi

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I do love the calm ones. My lot generally stay out of trouble but neighbour has had to free a rug from time to time. They just stand waiting then toddle off as if nothing happened.
 

equi

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At least you noticed! A friend of mine left for work one morning and saw her horse standing at the fence line. Came home ten hours later and horse was still in the same spot, ground a bit worn away. The front clip on his rug had clipped itself to the top wire 😮

I never used anything but buckle fronted rugs after hearing about it.
I always make sure any clips are clipped into the chest never out as experience has taught me. I go mental if someone leaves a clip facing out!
 

Rowreach

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I always make sure any clips are clipped into the chest never out as experience has taught me. I go mental if someone leaves a clip facing out!
Exactly, I always insisted they were clipped inwards, but frequently found them outwards, so the easiest thing was to do away with them altogether and not buy any more.
 

Gloi

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Friend's Fell pony years ago was in a field with mine with a ditch at one side with a high bank the other side with sheep netting at the top. Nothing had ever crossed the ditch previously. He managed to cross the ditch, climb the bank, get his shoe fast on the sheep netting, slide back down the bank pulling all the fencing with him and end up stuck in the ditch wrapped in sheep netting. I came to hay the ponies and couldn't see him, then found him in the water wrapped in fencing. Dashed home for the wire cutters and help and with a struggle we cut him out of the netting . Not a scratch on him and none the worse for wear except for being cold and wet.
 

palo1

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You are very lucky! I had a much loved horse put his foot in sheep netting, getting the wire trapped between hoof and shoe with the result that he did panic, pull up many yards of fence and sever a tendon in his panic. Tragically he could not be sorted and had to be pts. :(
 

conniegirl

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At least you noticed! A friend of mine left for work one morning and saw her horse standing at the fence line. Came home ten hours later and horse was still in the same spot, ground a bit worn away. The front clip on his rug had clipped itself to the top wire 😮

I never used anything but buckle fronted rugs after hearing about it.
I had the same happen, luckily pony just stood there shouting for help until neighbour spotted him and free'd him.

Unfortunatly not having clips doesnt solve the problem, my welshie got a tbar fastening stuck in his haynet, ripped the haynet from the wall (it was attached via bailer twine) and was found eating from the haynet attached to his chest!
 

milliepops

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Unfortunatly not having clips doesnt solve the problem, my welshie got a tbar fastening stuck in his haynet, ripped the haynet from the wall (it was attached via bailer twine) and was found eating from the haynet attached to his chest!
yep Kira has done this with t bar clips, she doesn't have the instinct to wait to be rescued, she doesn't see the need so applies brute force herself and on that occasion she shredded the rug and haynet :rolleyes:

At one livery yard Millie had a habit of pawing at the stock fencing and getting a foot stuck. She was patient and sheepish waiting to be rescued. Now she is just a serial escapee :mad:o_O;)
 

sportsmansB

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I found a special one of mine (on a bank holiday of course, double vet call out) standing bemused inside a 10m circle of electrified wire with blood gushing from his leg.
He.d managed to cut the leg, pull all the wire from the posts and it had curled up all around him
At least he stood there...
 

ihatework

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I arrived one morning to find one of my horses attached to the gate with a lead rope clip piercing his nose.

Truely special that one 😜 prior to that he had adopted a rather non-PC nickname beginning with R
 
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Having a real drama queen of a horse now has really made me hanker after another sensible soul! My boy can make a drama out of nothing and create trouble where if he'd just paused for a second all would have been fine.

I do laugh at people who have sensible horses and wish for more 'zing' it gets tiresome very quickly :rolleyes::D
 
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This is my very sensible little connie mare, in a rather sticky situation last summer. She got chased by one of the bigger horses and tried to jump her way out of trouble. Luckily someone was around to witness this and we had builders working on the farm at the time who were able to unhinge the gate and help her out fairly quickly, but she didn't panic at all. No damage, just a few days off and a check up with the physio.

She has also got a leg tangled in loose wire on a bridle path, stood still and allowed me to untangle her, and has attatched herself to her haynet overnight and stood calmy by her door until morning until I unhooked her.

I love calm, sensible horses!!

38208509_10157238904934041_8961583553846444032_n.jpg
 

rabatsa

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My trotter x was found with both hind legs through sheep netting up to his hocks. We think he had been rolling and done it. He stayed still while the netting was cut off then got up and started to graze. Not even a scratch on him.
 

equi

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Ah connies. My old yard had one that would get himself cast a fair bit. He would just lie there dozing until someone came to pull him over, sometimes not even getting up after being pulled over.

Will admit though that the big pointy bit made me a bit nervous - thank god she didn't jump that bit :O
 
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Ah connies. My old yard had one that would get himself cast a fair bit. He would just lie there dozing until someone came to pull him over, sometimes not even getting up after being pulled over.

Will admit though that the big pointy bit made me a bit nervous - thank god she didn't jump that bit :O
I agree! That's how we all felt at the time. New gate has now been installed with a different design- no big pointy bit!!
 
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