Looking to buy a horse need some advice

Pearlsasinger

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Do not buy any horse which has just been backed or is ready for backing for your children to ride! That is a nasty accident waiting to happen. Children need a horse/pony that knows its job and can help the children to learn. Even more experienced riders need an experienced horse as a first horse, there is so much to learn about keeping and riding your own horse , as opposed to one that someone else deals with most of the time.

Horses are NOT like cars/bikes, they are all individuals and need to learn what is expected of them, they are not just programmed to do a certain thing at a certain point/flick of a switch. If you value your children's lives and feel that you *must* buy a pony get an experienced one, preferably in couple of years time when they have a bit more riding experience.

ETA, there isn't much for sale at the moment because of the lockdown, if you are not in a hurry wait until things are a bit easier when there will be plenty of older, more appropriate horses for sale.
 

TPO

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To add to the "do not" list, do not put a 9mth old on a horse walker.

You cant know what you dont know therefore you have to learn BEFORE purchasing a horse, never mind a poor looking 9mth colt from a dealer with a questionable reputation.

As you're into cars this is like buying some powerful sports car for a learner driver to learn on. They also have to do all the oil changes and engine calibrations with no prior experience. A recipe for disaster

If your wife wants a horse buy one that is already doing what she wants to be doing at her level (wouldn't buy a McLaren for someone who has just passed their test having not driven for years). Get that horse better before buying.

Itll cost more initally but less in the long run (physically and mentally).

If your wife is jait dipping her toe back in and the kids are still learning why not look for a share or loan horse to see how that goes.

Horses are a big commitment and cant be garaged like cars.

It's good to have support from someone more experienced but when you know so little it's very easy to be taken advantage of and/or not know enough to decipher good from bad advice.

Leave the colt where it is and invest in lessons both on and off the horse. Perhaps your wife could look into something like the BHS stages exams or stable management courses/qualifications.

There is so much information out there and if your wife has been out of it for a while there will be big changes regarding feeding, management and training.

No one is being mean or trying to suck the fun out of your idea. These are all experienced people with years under their belt and it 100% is a very, very bad idea to buy this colt or even the 3yr old.

I'd still advise sharing or leaning alongside lots of lessons but if the insistence is to buy get something already doing the job well and safely.
 

be positive

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We've looked into loan but the ones near us say no children are no novice riders so limits us to buying were just looking at the minute theirs a few older horse but most need backing are putting back to work. Is a filly a better option than a colt. I'm not in rush to buy. We've been to the stables and looked round and spoke to the owner. She described what she would do has she has shown horses for years and had a few foals over that time.
You want a childs pony, not a horse so are probably looking in the wrong places or for the wrong type, no idea what age your children are but they will grow, the may give up, they need something that fits and suits now or at least does when you buy or loan it and as they grow they may require a bigger one.

Take a step back, wait until everything is getting back to normality and be more realistic in what you need, it is easy to get carried away once an idea is planted in your mind, especially when everyone is pretty bored at the moment, but the reality is that any youngster will be challenging, expensive, possibly unsuitable and if it is all 3 your children will probably give up anyway leaving you and your wife to deal with it.
 

Equi

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I highly suspect we will get a thread in another week saying “foals a nightmare what do we do”

no good breeder would sell a foal without a passport or travel it to complete beginners.
I don’t suppose you will listen so all I can say to you is don’t let your children get attached cause this ain’t gonna end well.
 

Equi

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Harry Stoyles is a well known dodgy dealer. Like on the really dodgy list.
it’s probable the foal is poor and sick and will die without proper knowledge and expensive care. A cheap foal is not always a cheap foal.
I’ve known far too many people who buy a cheap young horse cause they felt sorry for it for it to die on them a week later.
You wouldn’t buy a puppy out of the back of a van and this seems to be the same situation.
 

Equi

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I apologise if we’re being tough Op but it’s just we have a wealth of experience and know how these things end up and we only have your children’s and wife’s safety in mind, and that of the foals too.
 

cobgoblin

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OP, I'm sorry but on reading your first post I thought it was some kind of joke.

I don't know who's advising you (I suspect no one) but they need their head examining.
How on earth have you managed to view this youngster during lockdown? Or are you buying unseen?
This dealer will be well aware of how unsuitable this horse is for your situation, he will also be aware that selling without a passport is illegal... You are being taken for a mug.
Save yourself a lot of hassle, money and possibly heartbreak, by waiting until lockdown is over. Then view some older ponies that are suitable for your children to start riding immediately rather than years down the road.
.
 

thingstodotoday

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Oh my actual god I just looked at his facebook page. OP clearly you have no idea if you would even consider buying off him!
Every single one of your posts screams that you have no idea and this will be a disaster. The fact that your wife seems to think this is a good idea shows how little idea you all have about what this entails. She rode a bit a few years back?! God help this poor foal
 

ownedbyaconnie

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We've looked into loan but the ones near us say no children are no novice riders so limits us to buying were just looking at the minute theirs a few older horse but most need backing are putting back to work. Is a filly a better option than a colt. I'm not in rush to buy. We've been to the stables and looked round and spoke to the owner. She described what she would do has she has shown horses for years and had a few foals over that time.
There's a reason people don't want children/novice riders on their horses and that is because horses are living breathing animals with their own mind. Horses are very clever and will quickly take advantage of less experienced handlers.

Some riding stables allow you to "share" their ponies, this would be a great way of your children learning how to care for a horse with full supervision. I just don't understand why you would wait 4+ years for your children to enjoy the pony. Also backing is a long process, it won't be a case of the pony turning 4 and your children can suddenly hop on and go to pony camp.

A foal is not a cuddly pet, if they want something to cuddle get them a rabbit.
 
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I'm listening to all this advise like said I'm not rushing my kid range from 3 to 15 I was only asking for advice which ive got were not going to buying a foal so don't worry you won't see a post say foals nightmare etc. like I said before theirs no loans near us, but will keep looking. And money isn't a issue I've got x amount for the horse and x amount for stables and equipment food vets etc and the longer we wait the more cash we have. The stables we are looking at has a lot of good recommendations from freinds. My aim was to a get a horse to grow with my kids and learn with them not a horse that's been jumped because my kids won't be at a level to jump. I don't expect to buy a horse and my kids get straight I don't mind it taking months are even years to get my kids on the horse as while the horse is getting trained my kids and wife are learning.
 
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Might of been a mistake asking on here seems to be a lot of negative people iv admitted I don't have a clue I'm looking for advice on a foal and I've take on board that it's a bad idea. And are looking at other options and I'm not in a rush to buy. And I will view an look out for suitable horse ex riding school kids poney etc that's been riden by kids.
 

Errin Paddywack

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Someone I used to teach was bought a pony by her parents, no advice asked for unfortunately. Turned up with a weedy welsh about 12.2. When I checked its teeth it was a 2yr old. That pony eventually made a chunky 13.2 and was an extremely difficult ride. Poor girl really struggled with it. It was sold a few years later to a local dealer, a very honest chap. We were looking at a pony of his at the time and recognised this pony there. His comment was that it needed a very experienced handler/rider indeed as it was a very difficult pony. Shame as it was a nice looking animal and could have been good had it had the right upbringing.
 

HeyMich

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Might of been a mistake asking on here seems to be a lot of negative people iv admitted I don't have a clue I'm looking for advice on a foal and I've take on board that it's a bad idea. And are looking at other options and I'm not in a rush to buy. And I will view an look out for suitable horse ex riding school kids poney etc that's been riden by kids.
No, it absolutely wasn't a mistake to ask on here! You did the right thing, and have had some very good advice.

Please listen to that advice - otherwise you could end up injuring your children (or worse), or at least knocking their confidence and ruining their experiences of pony/horse ownership. The foal will find another home, somewhere with suitable company and turn out and someone to bring it on slowly and appropriately.

If I were you, I would ask at some local riding schools (non necessarily big competition yards) for regular lessons and stable management days - your kids will learn so much and have fun learning! When you are all ready to take the plunge, look into a loan or a part share of an older, experienced pony - just because a pony has jumped, it doesn't mean that it always needs to jump, in fact, because it has jumped, it will have manners, brakes and the knowledge to keep a child safe and secure.

Good luck, and I hope you make the right decisions for you and your kids.

.
 

FinnBobs

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Might of been a mistake asking on here seems to be a lot of negative people iv admitted I don't have a clue I'm looking for advice on a foal and I've take on board that it's a bad idea. And are looking at other options and I'm not in a rush to buy. And I will view an look out for suitable horse ex riding school kids poney etc that's been riden by kids.
Please don't leave Lee there's a lot of really good knowledge on this forum. I think people do just want you all to be safe. I have had my first horse for 3 years and that was after riding school lessons for 24 years, Riding holidays, helping at the local Riding School all through Secondary School, loaning etc and I quickly realized that I actually didn't know that much and have had quite a learning curve!

Unfortunately it's not the best idea to try and learn together with a pony. You're much better to get an older pony that will help to teach your children because you can inadvertently ruin a pony even with the best intentions through lack of experience and it can be dangerous as others have pointed out.

I hope you haven't been put off and find a more suitable pony when you are ready :)
 

gallopingby

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I’m sure you’ll find a suitable pony if you follow the advice on here and wait until after lockdown. Most of the people commenting have had years of experience in finding and looking after horses. It’s great that you want your kids to learn correctly but sad that so many well intentioned people find themselves with problems because they’ve been ill advised. The best thing would be to see if you could fine either an experienced older pony that’s been genuinely outgrown or someone looking to share their pony. It’s money well spent to buy an older experienced one that knows the ropes and is known to be GENUINELY outgrown. Good luck 😉
 

ownedbyaconnie

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Might of been a mistake asking on here seems to be a lot of negative people iv admitted I don't have a clue I'm looking for advice on a foal and I've take on board that it's a bad idea. And are looking at other options and I'm not in a rush to buy. And I will view an look out for suitable horse ex riding school kids poney etc that's been riden by kids.
We're only deemed negative because we are disagreeing with what you want to do. You have practically zero horse experience as a family and you have come on to a horse forum asking for advice which you have been given.
 

cobgoblin

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Might of been a mistake asking on here seems to be a lot of negative people iv admitted I don't have a clue I'm looking for advice on a foal and I've take on board that it's a bad idea. And are looking at other options and I'm not in a rush to buy. And I will view an look out for suitable horse ex riding school kids poney etc that's been riden by kids.
It's not that we are negative... We are simply trying to save you from making a big mistake. Buying from dealers can be a traumatic experience for even experienced horse owners.. That's not to say that all dealers are bad, they're not, there are some very good ones out there.

I get that you have the romantic idea of a foal growing 'with your children'. It sounds lovely... But as your wife and children start learning to ride, that is exactly what they will want to do, ride.... But even when the horse is old enough and has been broken, he may still be unsuitable / too sharp/ the wrong size, and in any case he will be green.

Please wait a while until your family have had a good grounding in lessons... It may be that not everyone takes to riding in the way that you think they will and that may influence the size or type that you buy. Most riding schools offer pony share schemes or management courses... Prepare yourself as much as you can.
.
 

be positive

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We're only deemed negative because we are disagreeing with what you want to do. You have practically zero horse experience as a family and you have come on to a horse forum asking for advice which you have been given.
I picked my user name because I try to see the positive in most situations, I usually find middle ground but in this situation my many years of experience in various aspects of owning, riding, training numerous horses and riders as a YO I cannot see any real positives other than the financial gain for the dealer and YO, children do not need to have things handed to them on a plate but they do need positive experiences if they are going to continue in any direction and that certainly applies to riding and owning a pony, it can be lovely on a bright spring day but very hard mid winter when it is pouring with rain and blowing a gale trying to handle a young pony that they cannot ride for at least 3 years is hardly going be a positive experience for them.
 

9tails

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My aim was to a get a horse to grow with my kids and learn with them not a horse that's been jumped because my kids won't be at a level to jump. I don't expect to buy a horse and my kids get straight I don't mind it taking months are even years to get my kids on the horse as while the horse is getting trained my kids and wife are learning.
This is a common misconception for people with little experience of horses. There's a well known saying "green plus green equals black and blue". If you have little or no experience, the young horse will learn that he can get away with being rude, you and your kids will become scared because even if he's little he'll be able to do a lot of damage to you. This isn't a maybe, it's guaranteed. Horses are only as good as their handlers, give them an inch and they'll take a mile. That's not to say that any horse should be treated harshly, in fact that's the worst thing you could do, but you won't know how to do it right.

We had a similar scenario at our yard, an inexperienced family bought a yearling filly. 12 years later, the mare was still unbroken and nobody was willing to help back her as she was lethal. She was given away eventually and I bet the previous owners are still congratulating themselves that they're finally rid of the liability.
 

southerncomfort

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Hi Lee,

If your kids are just starting riding lessons why not hang fire a bit.

The riding school will be able to assess them and advise you on what type of pony to look for when you are ready. Lots of riding schools also run Own a Pony days which teach children about the daily care of ponies. It helps them understand how much work is involved and the commitment needed.

Buying a baby is a lovely idea but the reality is quite boring because other than essential handling and vet/farrier visits their is really very little you can do with them except turn them out with their buddies and watch them grow. 🙂

It sounds like as a family you've all been bitten by the horsey bug and are itching to have a new equine friend. That's something we can all relate too (and why most of us are broke LOL!).

Take your time, make sure the kids are committed and that you are prepared for the fact that once you have a horse you'll never have the time, money or energy for anything else! 😀 Then once you are ready to start looking enlist an experienced friend or riding instructor to help you find the right one.

Good luck!
 

Red-1

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I don't think it is a wind up, I also found the FB post advertising this pony, and a Lee is interested for his wife in the comments.

Lee, I would hang fire. My advice is to save money and buy a mature pony who has already proved itself with another family, when you can afford it and once the kids can ride a bit.
 

ester

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I don't think it is a wind up, I also found the FB post advertising this pony, and a Lee is interested for his wife in the comments.

Lee, I would hang fire. My advice is to save money and buy a mature pony who has already proved itself with another family, when you can afford it and once the kids can ride a bit.
same.
 

Starzaan

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I can’t be the only riding instructor putting my head in my hands and wondering why I bothered to take my exams whilst reading this thread. 🤦‍♀️

A yearling, for a first horse, for non horsey owners, who want their children to ride and care for it.

I suppose at least this is where we instructors get the majority of our work. People who have completely over horsed themselves, or bought with absolutely no idea what they’re doing.

Good oh.
 
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