Looking to move to USA

Joined
15 October 2014
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16
Hi I am looking to move to USA for a few months at first, to work and travel a little bit and if I like it stay long term. I was wondering if anyone would be able to advise me on how to start the process. Which state to move to? Where to look for equestrian jobs in US? What websites? I am looking to work as a groom/rider. I have experience working in riding schools, stud yards, livery yards, racing and eventing. I completed HNC, HND equine studies courses as well as Equine Business Management Degree and I have additional horse care qualifications. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance!
 

shortstuff99

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23 September 2008
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Currently Cambridgeshire! (or where ever I fancy)!
If you're looking to be employed during your time in the US rather than just as a tourist you will need a working Visa and these are very difficult to get as you will need to be sponsored by your employer and they will have to prove how a US citizen couldn't do that job in you place. More details here https://uk.usembassy.gov/visas/temporary-employment/

Otherwise Ocala in Florida is a really big horse area.
 

Elf On A Shelf

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28 February 2011
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11,575
Working in a tb stud sill get you into America. Coolmore have a big farm in Kentucky, I can't remember where Godolphins is. Then obviously you have Lanes End, Tailor Made etc to look into. Racing itself in America is very, very different though.
 
Joined
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Racing itself in America is very, very different though.
The whole equestrian scene is very, very different.
The culture is very, very different.

OP, if you haven't, it would be worth joining the Chronicle of the Horse forum and getting a feel for what areas of US equestrianism interest you. They of course have things that do not exist here eg Hunter/Jumper (and the whole dependance on a trainer and being in their 'program'), Saddleseat (american saddlebreds etc with 'set' tails which would be illegal here) and so on and so on... this doesn't even get to the whole ship horses to Mexico or Canada in appalling conditions situation.

There will of course be top horsemen/women who have excellent welfare standards. You need to go with your eyes open though so you don't end up going to the wrong place and end up having to care for big lick TWH for example... I'm not sure that any normal UK horsey person could deal with that.

Read this as well before you go, it does help explain some US ways to a non-american. https://www.waterstones.com/book/if-only-they-didnt-speak-english/jon-sopel/9781785942273
 
Joined
15 October 2014
Messages
16
The whole equestrian scene is very, very different.
The culture is very, very different.

OP, if you haven't, it would be worth joining the Chronicle of the Horse forum and getting a feel for what areas of US equestrianism interest you. They of course have things that do not exist here eg Hunter/Jumper (and the whole dependance on a trainer and being in their 'program'), Saddleseat (american saddlebreds etc with 'set' tails which would be illegal here) and so on and so on... this doesn't even get to the whole ship horses to Mexico or Canada in appalling conditions situation.

There will of course be top horsemen/women who have excellent welfare standards. You need to go with your eyes open though so you don't end up going to the wrong place and end up having to care for big lick TWH for example... I'm not sure that any normal UK horsey person could deal with that.

Read this as well before you go, it does help explain some US ways to a non-american. https://www.waterstones.com/book/if-only-they-didnt-speak-english/jon-sopel/9781785942273
I worked with horses in Poland as well before I moved to UK. I’ve worked on a few yards but of course still a lot to see and learn. I just thought if it is possible I want more experience and see other countries and places. Hence my post I just want to learn more :)
 

Widgeon

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30 January 2017
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Joined
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Hi I am looking to move to USA for a few months at first, to work and travel a little bit and if I like it stay long term. I was wondering if anyone would be able to advise me on how to start the process. Which state to move to? Where to look for equestrian jobs in US? What websites? I am looking to work as a groom/rider. I have experience working in riding schools, stud yards, livery yards, racing and eventing. I completed HNC, HND equine studies courses as well as Equine Business Management Degree and I have additional horse care qualifications. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance!
As someone mentioned previously, a work visa is a very difficult thing to come by these days in the US, so defintely do some research on that before seriously trying to jump into anything!

As for where to go in the US, there are many horsey areas! I'm from the western US originally (but now call the UK my home) and if you're into western riding/endurance/ranching (Montana, Wyoming, Idaho are best) it's a great place to try. There are also a fair number of jumping/eventing stables throughout the west (which is what I used to do), so you could still ride English while having access to other kinds of riding easily. East coast/Ocala is really the mecca for English riding disciplines in the US, although I've known people from that scene and according to them it can be very toxic and welfare standard for the horses aren't as high.

In general, the west is more laid back and friendly. California also has some top riding schools/trainers (you'll find it's much more trainer oriented there rather than riding schools) and I really loved riding in Oregon. As noted by previous posters, culture is just very very different there in general, but if you're game for it then that can be a good thing. I've found compared to the UK, and this is just my opinion, horsey people are friendlier and quicker to open up to you in the US, which is nice. They'll love that you're from England, so soak that up lol :p
 

HazuraJane

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Joined
8 April 2017
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214
I live in Northern California. There is a very active horse industry here. Were I in your shoes, I would look, as simsy6 said, in Oregon. Oregon has a considerably gentler cost-of-living than California. Oregon also has, BONUS, no sales tax. Northern California is home for me, but between costs of everything and wildfires, it's not where I would move to.

If, however, you do want to explore Northern Cal, PM me and I'll try to answer your questions.
Don't be too nervous about US v UK horse culture shock.
Everything will be different, so cultural differences will likely be more of a "Hmm, okay" than a "OMG I CAN'T BE DOING WITH THAT!"

Also there are many ex-pats here who have made California their permanent residence which makes me think the adjustment can't be too terrible.
 

BunnyDog

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Joined
20 November 2017
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476
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USA
@Wrachwal97 Clearly I am jumping in late to this thread but as an American who has worked in many parts of the USA doing horse jobs, I can tell you that very much like everywhere else there are good and bad barns and a host of the in between.

A work visa is incredibly difficult to get say my friends from abroad. But there are many horse jobs that pay cash, under the table, so you might be ok with an accent and without a Visa. (Not that I condone that but our administration has gone a bit nuts on the visa front)

Americans have a deep affinity for folks who ride with accents. You'll likely be fine.

I'm on the east coast in Pennsylvania and these are the "known" horsey areas of prevalence :

North Salem, Ny

Unionville, PA (near me)

Hunt Country, MD (around Baltimore, MD)

Middleburg, VA

Charlottesville, VA

Raleigh, NC

Charlotte, NC

Southern Pines, NC

Aiken, SC

Ocala, FL

West Palm Beach, FL

Lexington, KY

Burbank, CA

Temecula, CA (A big CCI is held there)

Most of Northern, Ca

Some areas around Phoenix, AZ

LARGE parts of Texas (English and Western)

Louisiana has a nice winter Jumper and Hunter Circuit but also regularly gets hurricanes.


I think you should come over, but I am saying that as I am wishing there was a way to go to the UK with my 2 horses and compete there instead of here!!! (Silly job, hubby and dogs in the way of that idea)

Good Luck.

Give a shout if you need any help or to run a name of a prospective employer by someone here to ensure they're not a bad apple!

Emily
 

Orangehorse

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25 November 2005
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11,107
Having a personal link or recommendation would be a good move. So people in the Morgan world who have imported horses from the USA maybe, I know people have gone over to spend time in a training yard. Or the english Western Riding world or Saddlebreds.

I know this isn't what you want, but when I was on holiday in Montana the temporary staff were regarded as trainees who didn't get paid! But the guests were expected to leave a large cash tip, which was their wages.

Is there any sort of employment agency who would be able to place you somewhere?
 

Ownedby4horses

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7 May 2020
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680
OP, we travel to Texas most years, you’re going to need to get your work visa before you even think of moving. To just visit, you need to get an ESTA to even allow you to get into the country and you’ll be asked on arrival your reason for your visit (you’re going to look seriously out of place towing a huge suitcase for a long stay when your tourist visa is for a short period.
I definitely wouldn’t want to fall foul of immigration in the USA.
If you haven’t been to the USA before and it’s a bit of a dream to go there and work, I would suggest when travel/Covid allows, you to over to where you are thinking of going to and have a good look around and see if you actually like it. It is incredibly different from the UK and it doesn’t suit everyone.
 

Caol Ila

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23 January 2012
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3,242
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Glasgow
The Trump administration has severely curtailed work visas. I'm a US citizen and my OH is a UK citizen. If we wanted to go back under the current regime, it would not be easy for him to get a visa (as a PhD chemist). I would table any plans to go there until after the election and in the meantime, hope to hell that Biden wins.
 
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