Midnight Ramblers - raging rant !

AdorableAlice

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haha top response AA:D:D
and damn fine looking gelding and yearling:) we must have more pics of your overexcitable bunch;)
Thank you, the gelding has been a horse of a lifetime. He starts under saddle in the morning as he is getting dangerous in hand.

Here is a poor quality picture of my much missed heavyweight especially for Maesfen. 18hh 6 year old and not furnished, gelding by Embla George out of Embla Daisy (Colman) bought as a 6 month old from Mrs. McMaster. It was taken at our PtoP and his first time on catching duties. Don't be fooled by my smile - it was fear, check out the white knuckles. He got a touch 'strong'!

 

AdorableAlice

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What a great sort he looks, you see few like that around anymore.
Sadly you are right, mould is broken. I tried to find another when I lost him but no hope, couldn't even find a foal. I ended up buying the bay gelding who isn't even British, but he has been a star. Maesfen explained how to do pictures so there is no stopping me now !



 

Spudlet

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Just read this whole thread, gosh! Firstly - there are lots of responsible walkers, of which I am one. I would not want to walk through a field of stock at night unless there was no other option available, and I certainly wouldn't want to take children through one at night. I think the organisers were very naughty! It's important to teach night navigation skills if they are planning on doing longer expeditions in the future, but to let large groups of noisy children into stock fields in the dark is daft. I am very glad to be able to walk on public rights of way, not so keen on grumpy landowners who judge before they know (the type that lump all walkers together, block rights of way up etc) - but very much appreciate the many landowners that do maintain rights of way, such as making sure stiles are not wibbly leg-breakers and so on.

Secondly - nice pics, glad to hear you are retraining all your animals;). Concerned about the cat though. You could try blow-darting it? Or a long pole with double-sided sticky-tape on the end? :p:D
 

AdorableAlice

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That grey is mahoosive !
He was 16h as a yearling, 18h at maturity, he had not let down in that picture aged 6. I lost him aged 13 and he was a very tall and deep horse. He was a successful H/W show hunter and did well in ID classes, he also did medium dressage. He was a true gentle giant, I rarely used a headcollar at home on him, he just followed like a large dog ! Easy to do anything with and he was really funny to clip because he just adored it. He would go to sleep and start rocking and buckle his knees. To do his head I sat on a beer crate and he put his head on my knee. Bit like doing the Forth Bridge though, as I finished one end the other end had grown again.

His size was part of his undoing really, he had 2 colic operations in the space of 3 days and the vets said it was very difficult to lift and operate on such a large horse. The first op was a success but his stomach ruptured and he was lost on the table during the op to save him. I still miss him even though some years have passed now.
 

AdorableAlice

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Just read this whole thread, gosh! Firstly - there are lots of responsible walkers, of which I am one. I would not want to walk through a field of stock at night unless there was no other option available, and I certainly wouldn't want to take children through one at night. I think the organisers were very naughty! It's important to teach night navigation skills if they are planning on doing longer expeditions in the future, but to let large groups of noisy children into stock fields in the dark is daft. I am very glad to be able to walk on public rights of way, not so keen on grumpy landowners who judge before they know (the type that lump all walkers together, block rights of way up etc) - but very much appreciate the many landowners that do maintain rights of way, such as making sure stiles are not wibbly leg-breakers and so on.

Secondly - nice pics, glad to hear you are retraining all your animals;). Concerned about the cat though. You could try blow-darting it? Or a long pole with double-sided sticky-tape on the end? :p:D
Blow dart me and stick a pole up my bottom at your peril......!!

 

redredruby

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I think that was the best response ever on h&h!!

And I have to say that your horses are gorgeous - really stunning! (and I am a little jealous!)

:D
 

onemoretime

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Arrive at my yard for the final put to bed at 8.30pm last night and find a strangers car on the hard standing outside. A nice gentleman tells me a group of children, (they turned out to be Scouts and Brownies all looked under 14) were doing a midnight ramble. The nice gentleman was to man the lane crossing were a public footpath crosses from my neighbours wheat field onto my grazing land. The path then runs through one big field with cows in and 2 small paddocks and between the cattle shed and rear of a block of 6 boxes.

I was told there were 150 children coming in groups of 20 ish. Bear in mind it is now dark, wet, cold, windy and in the middle of nowhere.

It's a well known and popular path which doesn't cause any problems normally, we tend to see the same people using it through the summer and it is less used in winter.

I thought it best to put the cows/calves and the bull in the shed and put the light on which gave some light onto the stile the walkers would have to use.

In the smaller paddock I had a mare and her weaned foal/yearling which I intended to catch. Unfortunately the first group of children got into the paddocks before I could catch them and all hell let loose. 20 screaming kids in hi-vis jackets with head torches, the children were spread out in a train and some got in front of the yearling and some behind, the mare panicked and shot off in the opposite direction to the yearling. The adult walker at the front of the train opened the gate onto my neighbours land and the yearling went for the gate, the big mare turned and galloped after the yearling scattering the children ................and I went fecking ballistic !!!!......and to add insult to injury my stabled horses had all lost the plot and were spinning like tops in their boxes.

The next group of children had yet to arrive so I caught the totally distressed mare and yearling and got them inside. The yearling settled immediately but the mare who is a very placid cob normally had lost the plot, she was terrified, panting, sweating and shaking.

Another 8 groups crossed the paddocks in the space of 2 hours, the horses could hear them coming from miles away, I had no idea sound could travel so well in the dark and when they reached my yard the horses could see the head torches which drove the horses potty. Even the cattle started charging around the shed making lots of noise.

The organisers did apologise and it is a public footpath so anyone can go on it at any time and there is nothing I can do about it or complain to.

It took ages for the stock to calm down and in the mare's case cool down, thankfully she is not in foal this year. I was incensed last night and cannot imagine what pleasure all these young children got from wallking 12 miles on a cold windy night in pitch black very wet fields.

What on earth would I be facing if that mare had trampled a child, it does not bear thinking about.
I am insensed reading this. I am so sorry for you I do hope your horses and cows are recovering now. How dangerous is that, as you so rightly say, what if one of the horses had knocked over a kid, I suppose that would have been your fault!!

They should have given you ample notice so that you could have moved the animals to another field. How thoughtless and irresponsible of the organisers of this ramble. More like rabble!!!
 

Clannad48

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As this thread has reappeared I am pleased to be able to update everyone who gave me excellent guidance.

After contacting the relevant authorities, errors in the organisation of the event have been admitted and apologies accepted by the local landowners. We are now looking forward to welcoming the Scouts in the future.

To the few posters who questioned my and my animals reactions on that rather exceptional night. I hang my head in shame that my animals could not cope and as quoted above - 'they have never been exposed to exciting things'. I have addressed this problem to ensure that the next time 150 screaming children wearing head lamps cross my paddocks at night, without prior warning, the animals will be bombproof.

The steps taken are: The bull and his wives have gone to be parelli trained. At present it has been tricky to determine if the bull is right or left *******ed, but it has been confirmed he has large ones. The wives are proving difficult to train as they have sex on their minds all the time.

The 28 year old pony is in therapy. It has been a while since she was a multi championship winning first ridden and MM worker. She must have forgotten the bright lights of her glittering career, shame on her.

The 22 year old mare also suffered memory loss, a successful small hunter in her day plus 10 seasons as a secretaries horse, she has been sent to the circus for re-training.

The cob mare, 14 year old and the worst affected on the night, packed her haynet and left home, she is thought to be in the company of a handsome thoroughbred in Cornwall, the hopeful result of her holiday in Cornwall, will be given a headlamp attached to a small child as a present at birth.

The 4 year old section A loved the night and has joined the scouts, he is freshly gelded and simply loves the Brownies - might need a good solicitor shortly.

The 17.2hh is in training and I have attached a picture of him at his first small equine garden party. SusieT, rest assurred this equine garden party has plenty of noise and lights, so he is getting good training, but if you feel you could help him I would be delighted. He has been on box rest for 10 months and needs an expert to handle him at present.

The foal, it's her birthday today, she is a whole 1. Picture for you, her training is coming along well. She is having a drum kit for her present and already has fairy lights in her stable. She is booked in for parelli and then is going to the circus.

The cat is still up the same tree she escaped to on the night and refuses to fall into the arms of a very handsome man in a uniform. I offered but he laughed at me and said he couldn't cope with an hysterical female.


Brilliant - absolutely brilliant

Just one thing though - please can you come and speak to my boss to explain why he shouldn'yt give me my P45 for spitting tea all over him because I was laughing so much - he thought I was compiling data - which I must confess isn't very funny
 

onemoretime

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Hi AA
Contact them and ask to see a copy of their Risk Assesment from last night and how they are going to amend it after the Near Miss they had.
If you can't find them write to the Scouts HQ and get them to investigate for you .
You can't stop them using the path but hopefully the paperwork will either put them off or make them have the courtesy to let you know before hand.
That's very good advice Dave.
 

Patterdale

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Hilarious - I read the OP oeinginally and thought how annoyed I would have been, then only just read all the rest now.

Some people (coughsusietcough) are UNBELIEVABLE!

If that was on our place (especially now with the lambs) they would have been told in no uncertain terms where they could ramble off to! Footpath or no.

If people can't respect your property and use even a little common sense they can b*gger off as far as I'm concerned. A farm is a business and a livelihood and not a playground.

My beasties would gave reacted just the same way.
 

onemoretime

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'
This thread would never have been started if the organisers had given my neighbours and I the courtesy of telling us what they were going to do on the night of the 27th April. Had I known, the mare and yearling would have been tucked up out of the way, the bull and his wives been in the shed and the other horses sedated, top doors closed and radio 4 on -- exactly what I do when the hunt is about. ' ah so they never normally are exposed to exciting things so dont get used to them!
Butt out Susie T you are a trouble maker!!!
 

AdorableAlice

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Quite agree Dolce. There is no need to wind the situation up OP has already had a load of upset and stress.
Kind words, It takes a fair bit to rev me up to be honest. The thread has been informative, funny and thought provoking. I would like to think the Scout Movement has taken on board the risks involved in crossing farms and improve their organisation of such rambles in the future.
 

onemoretime

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As this thread has reappeared I am pleased to be able to update everyone who gave me excellent guidance.

After contacting the relevant authorities, errors in the organisation of the event have been admitted and apologies accepted by the local landowners. We are now looking forward to welcoming the Scouts in the future.

To the few posters who questioned my and my animals reactions on that rather exceptional night. I hang my head in shame that my animals could not cope and as quoted above - 'they have never been exposed to exciting things'. I have addressed this problem to ensure that the next time 150 screaming children wearing head lamps cross my paddocks at night, without prior warning, the animals will be bombproof.

The steps taken are: The bull and his wives have gone to be parelli trained. At present it has been tricky to determine if the bull is right or left *******ed, but it has been confirmed he has large ones. The wives are proving difficult to train as they have sex on their minds all the time.

The 28 year old pony is in therapy. It has been a while since she was a multi championship winning first ridden and MM worker. She must have forgotten the bright lights of her glittering career, shame on her.

The 22 year old mare also suffered memory loss, a successful small hunter in her day plus 10 seasons as a secretaries horse, she has been sent to the circus for re-training.

The cob mare, 14 year old and the worst affected on the night, packed her haynet and left home, she is thought to be in the company of a handsome thoroughbred in Cornwall, the hopeful result of her holiday in Cornwall, will be given a headlamp attached to a small child as a present at birth.

The 4 year old section A loved the night and has joined the scouts, he is freshly gelded and simply loves the Brownies - might need a good solicitor shortly.

The 17.2hh is in training and I have attached a picture of him at his first small equine garden party. SusieT, rest assurred this equine garden party has plenty of noise and lights, so he is getting good training, but if you feel you could help him I would be delighted. He has been on box rest for 10 months and needs an expert to handle him at present.

The foal, it's her birthday today, she is a whole 1. Picture for you, her training is coming along well. She is having a drum kit for her present and already has fairy lights in her stable. She is booked in for parelli and then is going to the circus.

The cat is still up the same tree she escaped to on the night and refuses to fall into the arms of a very handsome man in a uniform. I offered but he laughed at me and said he couldn't cope with an hysterical female.




Luv it luv it luv it. Im so sorry that you have had to endure some of the crap doled out on this forum but there are plenty of us who support you. I hope you can recover from this unfortunate event and that rules will be put in place so that it is not repeated.
 

onemoretime

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He was 16h as a yearling, 18h at maturity, he had not let down in that picture aged 6. I lost him aged 13 and he was a very tall and deep horse. He was a successful H/W show hunter and did well in ID classes, he also did medium dressage. He was a true gentle giant, I rarely used a headcollar at home on him, he just followed like a large dog ! Easy to do anything with and he was really funny to clip because he just adored it. He would go to sleep and start rocking and buckle his knees. To do his head I sat on a beer crate and he put his head on my knee. Bit like doing the Forth Bridge though, as I finished one end the other end had grown again.

His size was part of his undoing really, he had 2 colic operations in the space of 3 days and the vets said it was very difficult to lift and operate on such a large horse. The first op was a success but his stomach ruptured and he was lost on the table during the op to save him. I still miss him even though some years have passed now.
I love your foal, who is he by? Also so sorry for your loss of the big grey horse.
 

meesha

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brilliant response - really really funny - gorgeous horses !

Will be putting your de-sensitising into practice with my 2 as my neighbours looked after them while I was away a while ago and tried to use headlamps in the dark and had to turn them off as my 2 were terrified!. Any more tips !!! pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeease.
 

suestowford

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Having followed this thread I had to join in and say how much I enjoyed the recent posting by AA. Brightened up a very dull morning, thanks!

I do use a headtorch in winter, they're great for keeping my hands free for huge haynets, and oddly enough, when it comes accompanied by a huge haynet, my ponies are never that bothered by the headtorch. But then, it's only one torch on one person, somewhat different to the OP's original problem.
 

AdorableAlice

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Onemoretime - that's the mare that totally lost it when the scouts came over.

She is by far the most sensible of the lot, rides, drives etc. I think she could not fathom out the head torches and when her daughter shot off in the opposite direction she panicked, (they are weaned though). It took her a couple of days to settle again.
 

Taffyhorse

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Fabulous reply AA - I'm another one who now needs mop coffee off the keyboard and explain to the dog that my snort and subsequent choking fit was not a signal to go for a walk.

Love your beasties, they all look fabulous and sorry to hear about the loss of your grey, he looked a truly lovely horse.
 

ozpoz

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oh, TOP response, Adorable Alice!

:D:D

But, why on earth don't their leaders simply teach the Scouts and Brownies how to properly go about in the country? Least disturbance possible to wildlife and farm stock?

No,no let's all don fluorescents and go around in a town sized crowd - taking our own street lighting with us and turn it into a speed competition while we're at it.
I'd be furious if my horses had been subjected to this without having the chance to bring them out of harm's way.
 

onemoretime

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Onemoretime - that's the mare that totally lost it when the scouts came over.

She is by far the most sensible of the lot, rides, drives etc. I think she could not fathom out the head torches and when her daughter shot off in the opposite direction she panicked, (they are weaned though). It took her a couple of days to settle again.
Thanks AA for the lovely photos. I hope the mare has settled now. My mare would have gone bananas at something like that and probably been hurt but she is a7/8ths TB and quite nervous.
 
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