Midnight Ramblers - raging rant !

Carefreegirl

Well-Known Member
Joined
31 July 2009
Messages
4,632
Location
MK
AA (can't quote on phone) I love your grey though at 18hh I'd get vertigo. Love the image of you clipping his head whilst sat on a beer crate - I however nite that nowhere in that sentence was the word 'empty' used in reference to the beer crate ;)
Regards the cat - water cannon ? Can't think for the life of me which HHO it is that has a brilliant picture of their cat in full flight, it really is a gob ya coffee over the keyboard :D
they also have pictures of their horses after playing 'horse skittles' - can anyone remember who it is ?
 

HappyHooves

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 December 2009
Messages
652
You are right Terri, I have to ensure the path is safe. Thankfully, where is crosses us we only have a short piece of approx 300 yards, but this does involve a circular gate from the lane onto the land which is only 10 feet away from the cattle shed, it then follows the hedgeline for 6 yards or so, crossing over the hardstanding and set of double heaver gates to a stile in the hedgeline. The cattle come and go through the gates/hardstanding into their shed where they are fed on a feed barrier.

The path then goes over the stile and into a small paddock which I use for limited turnout, foaling, sick horse etc. It follows the line of the buildings to another gate, this one is a 4' hunting type gate with a spring loaded self closure on it. The path is well marked with signage provided by the County Council. I add my own signage using weatherproof signs, insisting dogs are kept on leads as one of my horses will chase cur dogs and if that horse happens to be in the paddock a loose dog is in deep trouble.

On the whole the path does not cause any problems, it's been there for hundreds of years and enjoyed by many. The majority of the walkers are countryside lovers and respectful of what is around them. I also found the younger horses that see people coming through or the cross country runners coming past are actually benefitting from it as it makes the horses accept what they are seeing and become steady to it.

My gripe is detailed in my original post and I am just so relieved an accident did not happen. I do have public liability insurance.
What a nightmare! We used to have a footpath across the middle of one of our fields. Because of our dog going ballistic when it saw other dogs ( and however much signage you have about leads etc the public/dog walkers think their dog will be no problem so they wont bother with leads thank you!) we ended up putting a fence each side of the path. Expensive, but then it contained the public ( who previously used to wander around our fields for blackberries!) and was lessening the risks. If your paths, or part of them, run along a hedge, can you not fence them off from the rest of the field? Just a thought.
 

Maesfen

Extremely Old Nag!
Joined
20 June 2005
Messages
16,597
Location
Wynnstay - the Best!
Thank you so much for that special picture! Glorious sort but what else would you expect from such great breeding. Happy to report that they are still breeding the same sort from the same lines but you'd go a long way to find one as nice as your boy. I'll show them that pic later, they'll love to see it. x
 

AdorableAlice

Well-Known Member
Joined
24 October 2011
Messages
12,499
As many of you know I have been advised to train my horses to exciting things and I have put in a re-training programme for them all.

I do apologise for all the coffee sprayed over keyboards and to the poor lady who received her P45 for spitting coffee at her boss, who apparently thought his employee was data imputting, when in fact she was learning how to bombproof horses on the Adorable Alice system. I am going to launch the system in the hope I can become a millionaire like Prat Parelli.

Today I hosted the Young Farmers Stock Judging Equine Section, the yearling and the 23 year old mare, together with 2 visiting cobs, had further steadiness training with young people. No head torches this time just lots of flapping white coats. I am delighted to say my delinquent horses took it in their stride. The yearling rather enjoyed it only getting bored in the last ten minutes. She had to walk circles for 10 minutes followed by an individual trot up, which she has never done before and she floated along, the buck at the end was an extra, she then stood still whilst 25 young farmers felt her legs and generally poked her up the bottom.

The 23 year old mare was a paragon of virtue, making sure she only pulled faces and threatened to kill children when no one was looking.



 
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