Pictures New owner/rider check in

Floofball

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Ooh floofball he’s gorgeous. And scrubs up well!
Thank you ☺️
Think I may’ve posted this on another thread but this is a pic from the day I picked him up. I’ve had horses my whole life, loved them all but never had a sound one 🙄 trying to keep expectations low BUT you never know 🤞🏻🤞🏻🤞🏻

E79F7890-C92F-46E1-8193-6496DA2598B6.jpeg
 

ownedbyaconnie

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E545CF70-460B-4169-B868-0EA81F9257DE.jpeg Well we are officially on a diet. She was scored an 8 😭 and at 14.1 weighed more than the other connie who is at least 15hh. But she’s out 24/7 on good grass and not being ridden. Until now…

Had a fab lesson stripping right back to basics. Forward and straight. I somehow managed 50 mins of trot. Have also joined the yard quest team!
 

Annagain

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View attachment 79926 Well we are officially on a diet. She was scored an 8 😭 and at 14.1 weighed more than the other connie who is at least 15hh. But she’s out 24/7 on good grass and not being ridden. Until now…

Had a fab lesson stripping right back to basics. Forward and straight. I somehow managed 50 mins of trot. Have also joined the yard quest team!
That 8 will be a 5 before you know it! Well done on 50 minutes of trot I think I'd struggle to do that now and I've ridden 4 times a week for the last year. My excuse is Charlie gets tired and needs lots of little breaks.....honest.
 

Annagain

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Even just typing this is making me cry but I'm beginning to think of to calling it a day with Charlie. I really don't know what to do.

The poor thing has done nothing wrong but I'm scared (for no good reason) when I do anything out of the ordinary on him and it's not fair to either of us. We did a fun ride yesterday and it wasn't much fun. It was 100% my fault. We did it last year and it was amazing but the route was reversed this year and nearly all the canters were downhill. I hate cantering downhill but felt obliged to do it as I knew my friend would want to. I was hanging on, not wanting to go too fast and he got stronger and stronger, eventually (understandably) lunging down to pull the reins out of hands (only when we were already cantering). He didn't really do anything once he'd done that, just went faster than I'd like (but not flat out) and he never once went without being told to go, walking through big open fields without even jogging. He really wasn't naughty but I want to relax and enjoy these things and I just can't bring myself to with him. He was only in a snaffle so maybe a stronger bit would help but he started leaping a bit when I held him back so I think it would make that worse. The jumps were all quite big so I didn't feel like I was missing out on jumping as I wouldn't have done them anyway apart from the very last one. It was only about 18" but even though I wanted to, I just kept thinking "You've survived this far, don't wreck it now."

If someone else was writing this I'd say "look at the positives, he walked nicely, he wasn't naughty, you dealt with it" but even though I know they're there, I just can't see them for myself. I shouldn't be 'surviving' these things I should be enjoying them and he should be enjoying what he does too. His flat work is really coming on but if I'm honest he doesn't love it. He's so forwards (although this is the first time he's been too forwards) out hacking but hard work to keep going in the school. I think he'd love to be out hunting, doing fun rides and jumping but a 2' fence terrifies me. Not that long ago I was eventing at 90 with Monty. I feel like such a failure.

On the other hand, is it better the devil you know? Was it just circumstances and am I brave enough to try again to see? Am I going to be like this with every new horse from now on so should I just push through it and hope it gets better? He was as easy to stop (at the end of fields with hedges / gates looming, I'm not sure I'd have managed mid-field) in a snaffle as Archie was in a waterford gag and Archie didn't bother me once I'd got used to it. I'm fine in the school and with normal hacking and have really enjoyed the last few lessons (tiny jumping, flat and poles) so is that enough for now? The thought of going through all those 'firsts' again with another one (and I would want another one, which sounds crazy when I've just described how I'm struggling) is the main thing putting me off selling him. I also can't bear the thought of looking again, it took me 14 months to find Charlie. And do I sell him first or look for something else then sell him? I think he'd sell fairly easily but if I bought another first I'd have to put Charlie on sales livery as the new one would need his stable so that would take a chunk of money and reduce what I can spend. When I bought him, his seller did say she'd have him back if I ever needed to sell him but I don't know how serious she was and, as a dealer (albeit a lovely one), she'd obviously have to give me less for him so I'd have less for a new one then. Do I keep going over the winter and sell in spring or sell him with potential to hunt now? It's a logistical nightmare.

My head's swimming. Even while typing this I've changed my mind about six times. At the moment I'm thinking 'stop feeling so sorry for yourself and get on with it.' By the end I'll be back to 'it's time to call it a day.' I had this with Archie but it was never this bad.

I've been so spoilt with Monty, I don't think I'll ever find what I want, which is Monty again. He was quite lazy but incredibly genuine so he never said no but only just gave it enough to get the job done, which made him very safe. He would literally go with the slightest squeeze, stay at the speed I set him at and then stop with the slightest touch on the rein. He didn't know what a race was, he was so utterly happy in himself that he didn't care if he was 100m in front of anyone else (actually I don't think that ever happened!) or 100m behind, in fact he was usually grateful to stop as soon as I suggested it. He'd lollop up to a 90cm fence in the most rhythmic little canter, pop it and then go back to sleep. I can count on the fingers of one hand the times he stopped at a fence (always my fault) in 15 years and two hands the number of poles he had. He was so talented that even when I cocked it up, he was so within his level of ability he could get us out of it. We always had loads of time faults XC which was just the way I liked it but jumped clear other than once when he spooked a fence judge and once when he was really tired at the end of a huge (to me) 90 course and I didn't ride him at a ditch and rail as I was terrified of it. He just dribbled to a halt but did it the second time. He didn't really enjoy dressage but he did it - up to elementary - because I asked him to and he wanted to please me. Fun rides were lovely, I could enjoy the countryside and pop a few fences without a second thought (although I still didn't like cantering downhill, even with him). Where the hell do I find that again?

I sometimes visualise myself on a nice black and white sturdy but smart cob with thundering hooves but a stride that doesn't really go anywhere but that demon then tells me it'll be so slow I'll be bored (I'm aware of the irony after I've just complained about Charlie being too fast) or I'll get the sort of cob who will live on his forehand, pull my arms out and tank everywhere with me or I'll find another way to screw him up too by being so neurotic.

I've had this written for the last three hours and only just decided to hit post.
 

milliepops

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AA is there a chance there's a tiny case of rose tinted specs going on? I hope this comes across in a supportive way rather than in a dismissive way, because that's how it's meant. But where you've mentioned even on Super Monty you didn't like cantering downhill, i sort of feel that you're setting you and Charlie up to have a hard time by trying to cope with cantering HIM downhill etc.
Obviously you had a pretty long term really good relationship with the others and that takes time and good experiences to build up. it may be that you just need more time to reach the same thing.

To accelerate it in a manageable way is there another way to get those kind of confidence-building moments in the piggy bank? Like, if you want to get the fun ride bit under your belt, would there be an instructor you trust who would go with you on their horse so you can do things on YOUR terms instead of feeling like you have to do stuff to "keep up" with your friend? It seems like a couple of goes like that where you can experiment with Charlie and his reactions without having to consider another person might help you find your comfort zone with him.
How about an XC lesson just looking at hills and not jumping, to find your balance together?

I do understand how you are feeling, Millie was my heart horse for years and I trusted her 100% though even she would have her tittish moments, it took me ages to stop comparing the next horses to her and feeling disappointed, but just accepting the differences and finding ways to explore the edges of new horse relationships helped to find new comfort zones. If he's not the right horse for you then that's just how it is, but I just wonder if it's possible to put yourself *out there* in a positive way for a little longer before deciding you have to sell?
 

Peglo

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Annagain I’m sorry your feeling like this. It must be so hard. What age is Charlie now? You’ve said you’ve had him a year? so you’ve given yourself plenty of time to get to know him. It could be that as he ages he becomes the horse your looking for. So hard when you just want your old horse back but you may get there with Charlie yet.
 

Annagain

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Thank you MP. I know where you’re coming from but in terms of Monty, I don’t think it’s rose tinted specs. I know he sounds too good to be true but he really was like like that. My downhill hang up goes back to Ebony when I was 16. We both fell over cantering down a hill and as he got up he stood on my arm and kicked me in the face. That’s why I wouldn’t have been happy doing it on M either.

I think what I’m finding hard is that with M I could get away with being crap but now it’s very obvious I can’t.

Except I know I’m not really crap, I mean I’m no Pippa Funnell but I’m not crap either, plenty of people would handle Charlie less well than me and I’ve sat some stuff others wouldn’t have but it’s how I feel at the moment. Like I said, if it was anyone else I’d be telling them how well they’re doing but I just don’t feel it.
 
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Annagain

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Annagain I’m sorry your feeling like this. It must be so hard. What age is Charlie now? You’ve said you’ve had him a year? so you’ve given yourself plenty of time to get to know him. It could be that as he ages he becomes the horse your looking for. So hard when you just want your old horse back but you may get there with Charlie yet.
He’s 7. 90% of the time he’s great but we’ve had 2 bad (well less than ideal) fun rides in 3 weeks so I’m feeling a bit sorry for myself. I’ll get over it. This was the first time I felt out of control on him and I’m a bit of a control freak when it comes to speed. I was the same with skiing!
 

Bernster

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Hmm, it’s always difficult to unpack these things. A year should be a decent amount of time to know a horse and decide if it’s the right one or not, but it depends how that year has gone.

If you make the decision to sell, and really commit to that, how do you feel? Relieved, sad but know it’s the right thing, or unsure still? That usually helps me when making a tough call.

Do you like him, do you enjoy riding him (albeit with the odd oops moment with a new challenge?).

I’m also thinking that, if you do more challenging things, can you go with company who can adapt and do what you need to? It sounds like you went beyond a reasonable stretch zone with the last 2 rides. I’d give those a miss, do the stuff you enjoy and are more confident with, then go back to the ‘stretch‘ when you’re ready, but with the right company or set up.

If you’re really not enjoying it, and you’d feel ok about moving him on, he does sound like a horse that will sell easily. But given the market, the increasing prices, and a potentially long search period, that gives you time to really work on it and see if you can be the right pairing. In terms of timing, I’d prefer to run 2 until,I was sure, albeit that’s a luxury in terms of cost etc. Unless you can loan or part share your boy in the meantime?

My final tuppence worth - it’s very close to the ride, so maybe take a breather, take the pressure off, give it some time and then re-assess - what is it he needs to do still, and how can you comfortably get there, and would he be the horse for you if he did get there?

Not sure if this will help but Bertie’s been a handful at times and def has some things we need to work on but overall I love spending time with him, he makes me smile, and I always want to get back riding him. Admittedly, we haven’t had a massive confidence wobble so that could come, but it just feels ‘right‘ 🤞
 

Bernster

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Mentioning 3 weeks made me think. Just checked my diary and I think both fun rides might have coincided with peri-menopausal pmt. Sorry all, as you were. :rolleyes:
LOL well, that would have made mine a far shorter reply haha. But taking a break (from more challenging stuff) and seeing how you feel in a few weeks time might give you a good comparison 😉
 

Caol Ila

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I have days where I wonder why I bought an ex-feral Highland who had a sporadic, bizarre start into domesticity. Could have waited longer, looked harder for a more established horse, or at least one who had a normal start to life. The Highland pony FB group seems filled with sane, sound Highlands. Maybe. I didn't know where they were when I was looking. Or if I could find one for circa 4K. But then I go out on a hack with friends who's horses are more difficult and more reactive than mine -- and those horses don't have an excuse. Maybe mine isn't doing so bad.

It's character building, isn't it?
 

tatty_v

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So new boy and I did our first dressage test at the weekend. Just a nice little intro given that the canter has a long way to go… we stayed home and submitted our test online as I haven’t taken him out solo yet (he’s definitely a worry wart so I think we need to build up to that).

I thought it was hideous, not helped by the dramatic spooking every time we got to the C-M corner, but we posted a solid 64% for fourth place overall.

I’m pleased we got through it, and the judge’s comment that it was “quietly ridden” was much appreciated. Onwards and upwards, hopefully with a bit more relaxation next time! 35C57C15-8585-4570-B2DE-271EF2C6B63D.jpeg
 

Trouper

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He’s 7. 90% of the time he’s great but we’ve had 2 bad (well less than ideal) fun rides in 3 weeks so I’m feeling a bit sorry for myself. I’ll get over it. This was the first time I felt out of control on him and I’m a bit of a control freak when it comes to speed. I was the same with skiing!
I just wonder if you could find a way to "separate you from the horse" - which may sound mad but might clarify the issues. Would it be possible to do a fun ride/fast hack on another horse which is not so forward going but would show you how you felt these days about meeting the sorts of things which made you feel uncomfortable on Charlie? In other words, is it the way Charlie behaves or is it just your reaction to it? I think they are two different things.

If you feel after that that Charlie is too much for you then you have your answer. If you just need to re-group and have some better experiences with a good instructor to re-gain your confidence then you can start to re-build from there.
 

J&S

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He’s 7. 90% of the time he’s great but we’ve had 2 bad (well less than ideal) fun rides in 3 weeks so I’m feeling a bit sorry for myself. I’ll get over it. This was the first time I felt out of control on him and I’m a bit of a control freak when it comes to speed. I was the same with skiing!
Annagain, it seems simple to me, just leave out the fun rides and stick with the things that both of you enjoy . Personally I don't think there is any fun in "fun rides"! Just go out quietly with your friends and build up some confidence in your horse in situations that don't bring back bad memories. In other words: set your self up for success!!
 

Annagain

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I just wonder if you could find a way to "separate you from the horse" - which may sound mad but might clarify the issues. Would it be possible to do a fun ride/fast hack on another horse which is not so forward going but would show you how you felt these days about meeting the sorts of things which made you feel uncomfortable on Charlie? In other words, is it the way Charlie behaves or is it just your reaction to it? I think they are two different things.

If you feel after that that Charlie is too much for you then you have your answer. If you just need to re-group and have some better experiences with a good instructor to re-gain your confidence then you can start to re-build from there.
It's totally me. He really wasn't naughty just picked up a bit of speed going down the hills and I overreacted.

Annagain, it seems simple to me, just leave out the fun rides and stick with the things that both of you enjoy . Personally I don't think there is any fun in "fun rides"! Just go out quietly with your friends and build up some confidence in your horse in situations that don't bring back bad memories. In other words: set your self up for success!!
The thing is I like fun rides, I want to do them and the first 5 or 6 on Charlie were fab. It's just the last two. I knew the one 3 weeks ago might be a challenge and he was a bit buzzy to start but actually he got better as the ride went on. This one in theory was better - only two of us and my friend was really supportive and happy to go at my speed but I felt obliged to let her have at least a bit of fun. When I look back at it without being ridiculously emotional (this is a new thing to me but I'm pretty sure it's hormonal) it really wasn't that bad. There were one or two slightly uphill bits where I relaxed and they were great., and some of the really downhill bits I didn't want to canter and he walked through huge open fields quite happily. I just worry about ruining him by being so nervy in certain situations.

I think I'll take him to the beach and see how we get on with a really good canter on the flat with no desperate need to stop.
 

Bernster

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On the galloping thing, firstly I’m not keen on downhill and much prefer uphill with something at the end to stop us. But hunting was brilliant for me in that I’m always trying to hold the horse and control the pace whereas when I just let finnegan go, it’s awesome. He’s sure footed, straight, and comes to a stop when needed. I just needed to get used to not holding him the whole time and enjoy it. Fun rides are much more fun now when I give him a bit of free rein.
 

Annagain

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On the galloping thing, firstly I’m not keen on downhill and much prefer uphill with something at the end to stop us. But hunting was brilliant for me in that I’m always trying to hold the horse and control the pace whereas when I just let finnegan go, it’s awesome. He’s sure footed, straight, and comes to a stop when needed. I just needed to get used to not holding him the whole time and enjoy it. Fun rides are much more fun now when I give him a bit of free rein.
I totally agree - I know what I need to do just can't force myself to do it. When Charlie pulled the reins out of my hands I literally only had the buckle. He went a bit faster but not much and for a second or two I was ok. But then I panicked, gathered up my reins and stopped him (we were nearly at the end of the field anyway). This all sounds so logical and fine and 'all's well that ends well' but in the moment I can't do it! The more I think about it, with a bit of distance between me and it the more I think it was the down hill that was the issue rather than Charlie. A girl caught up with us just afterwards and said he looked like he had a big smile on his face so maybe I'm the only one involved who thought it was a disaster!
 

Peglo

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1 June 2021
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Finally got the saddle fitter out and my old TB’s saddle fits T 🙌🏻 I’m so happy for the sentimental value and also reusing what I’ve got.
Now do I spend the money set aside incase I needed a new saddle on a bare back saddle pad or keep saving incase I need a new saddle next year??
hope your all getting on good and ready for winter.
 

iknowmyvalue

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22 August 2016
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Lincolnshire
I’ve learnt that clipping near Pepsi’s head is very scary for him. Think he’s probably been hit/ear twitched for moving. Managed to do a semi-decent job with some little trimmers and a lot of patience. Was ok if a little tense for body/legs. No matter, will be a little winter project to get him used to them.

We’ve also had a few good flatwork sessions recently! I’m starting to be able to actually use some leg, and get a little bit of stretch in his movements. Ignore the slightly forward seat, we are still working on his understanding that not all sitting up is pushing him forwards.

FB876CA5-2967-40E2-9FAE-8807815086CF.jpeg 235193E1-8905-4687-9378-07AD74F7ADEA.jpeg
 

abbijay

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I just wanted to check in with a little update on Baby Ace, having read that others have had wobbles it has made me feel better about mine! I'm going to admit that I didn't want to canter him because he was bucking when we did. He didn't seem to enjoy the school and found it blooming hard so I have done an incredible stint of over 3 months and only been in the arena twice. And I only went in the arena those 2 times because I'd entered a dressage test to "get him out and about" and I wasn't sure if we could do a 20m circle in trot, let alone two half 10m circles before i entered. He was brilliant at dressage and just took it all in his stride but I probably rode for 20 minutes tops and he just thought we were having a little trundle round 2 different arenas.
After our break this morning I took him back in the school. It was only supposed to be a warm up before I took him for a quiet walk on the XC field (where we first discovered his bucking because of the tractor of terror). He was in a lovely mood. The best rider (but least judgemental rider) on the yard was schooling in the other arena and her owner was watching her so I felt if I came off they'd be able to help. I put my leg on and asked for a canter. Just a long side. It is still a bit wobbly. But I couldn't care less! He cantered on both reins; he didn't buck to get his balance sorted, he didn't try and slam the handbrake on, he tried to stay on a straight line. I feel giving him the break to get used to his body and me has worked well for us.
And now I feel ready to face winter with a smile on my face. I can only hack on a weekend so we will have no choice but to use the school and now I feel we can do a bit without boring the pants off both of us or it becoming a trauma to either of us.
With the last shire I was already going out to affiliated prelim dressage after 5 months so I am nowhere near doing that with this baby. But I have bought him with a view to forever so I am in no rush! 241963596_4546711142056088_8583382080689966500_n.jpg
Picture from the dressage because I never need an excuse to post a clydesdale picture on here!
 
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Hormonal Filly

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24 April 2013
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Some very smart horses here! @ycbm he was a lucky find for sure!

I also did something ‘absolutely crazy’ too according to a friend and bought a filly unseen from DoneDeal. The most basic advert and rubbish photos but I something about her stood out to me! So got in touch with a long irish number, received plenty of photos and videos and she still caught my eye.

Arranged a 5* vetting (with a great vet recommended by a friend) and she passed. Yippee! Things got realistic now. Sent the money to someone I hoped was genuine and when she came off the lorry a few days later, I remember my heart was pumping through the roof ‘please don’t be a 13.2 donkey’

But thankfully an extremely sweet youngster walked off very calmly!

Since then (4 months ago) she’s been exactly as described. Clever, sweet and trainable but I’m not going to start her until next year. She was bred by Godolphin (Kildangan stud) and was out of one of their tease mares.

She’s bulked out quite a bit since she arrived. She currently a lot fluffier than these photos! 08207B25-D442-42F2-A35F-959A91CB2976.jpeg 9B7CD24A-9526-4058-AA1F-EE470CD2B531.jpeg 2432AC00-1659-4EAB-A23A-8B6BCFB40CD8.jpeg
 

Caol Ila

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It was chucking it down so I didn't ride. I also had to hike around Foinavon's field searching for his rug, which he lost last night. At least he left it in one piece.

Continued on with our in-hand work in the outdoor. He could walk a small circle around me on his lead rope, because he'd had 'natural horsemanship' training and that is what they do. But the NH trainer apparently said he couldn't lunge. Over the last couple months, I've asked for increasingly bigger circles and he's been circling in walk at the end of my 12ft lead rope. Today, I asked for a little trot. And he did it! He was quite surprised. Trotted half a circle, then stopped and looked at me like, "I did a thing!" I asked for a little more in that direction, then a short trot in the other direction. Quite pleased with him. I've got a 15ft lead on the way and will make a proper lunge line out of an old climbing rope.

Really baffled by how he could spend two months with a pro and not achieve this. And I'm only working on this stuff once or twice a week, if that! Usually we're out hacking.
 

ownedbyaconnie

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Had a really interesting physio session. She got me to sit on this pretend “horse” with pressure plate underneath it and I could see on a screen where my pressure points were. I had more pressure under my right seat bone and inner left thigh. My right hip was higher and further forward than my left and my right shoulder was the same compared to the left. After doing some exercises we discovered my right glute is essentially useless and my right side of my lumbar does the work instead.

was fascinating as I could see how this was affecting my ridden work. Got some exercises to work on at home and on pony and then going to have a ridden physio session in 4/6 weeks.
 

Annagain

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13,134
I just wanted to check in with a little update on Baby Ace, having read that others have had wobbles it has made me feel better about mine! I'm going to admit that I didn't want to canter him because he was bucking when we did. He didn't seem to enjoy the school and found it blooming hard so I have done an incredible stint of over 3 months and only been in the arena twice. And I only went in the arena those 2 times because I'd entered a dressage test to "get him out and about" and I wasn't sure if we could do a 20m circle in trot, let alone two half 10m circles before i entered. He was brilliant at dressage and just took it all in his stride but I probably rode for 20 minutes tops and he just thought we were having a little trundle round 2 different arenas.
After our break this morning I took him back in the school. It was only supposed to be a warm up before I took him for a quiet walk on the XC field (where we first discovered his bucking because of the tractor of terror). He was in a lovely mood. The best rider (but least judgemental rider) on the yard was schooling in the other arena and her owner was watching her so I felt if I came off they'd be able to help. I put my leg on and asked for a canter. Just a long side. It is still a bit wobbly. But I couldn't care less! He cantered on both reins; he didn't buck to get his balance sorted, he didn't try and slam the handbrake on, he tried to stay on a straight line. I feel giving him the break to get used to his body and me has worked well for us.
And now I feel ready to face winter with a smile on my face. I can only hack on a weekend so we will have no choice but to use the school and now I feel we can do a bit without boring the pants off both of us or it becoming a trauma to either of us.
With the last shire I was already going out to affiliated prelim dressage after 5 months so I am nowhere near doing that with this baby. But I have bought him with a view to forever so I am in no rush! View attachment 80646
Picture from the dressage because I never need an excuse to post a clydesdale picture on here!
This made me really smile this morning AJ! I love how his feathers make his legs look all wobbly!
 
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