New pony trouble - will a new yard be the answer?

Nicnac

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Sounds like he's enjoying the spring grass which could have upset his digestive system if he's been stabled for months. Rather than testing for ulcers, try a Probiotic such as Gut Balancer and keep using throughout the new move.

Everything else you are doing including saddle refit sounds fine. He will also be fit coming from a riding school so the lack of work will also have an impact. If he's out 24/7 I wouldn't give him any hard feed at all.
 
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Probably just adding more uncertainty - but this pony has had a complete and sudden change of diet, on top of mental stress of the move. I don't personally have experience of ulcers - others here will be more knowledgeable of whether this might apply.
With the spring grass as well, it will have affected his metabolism, which can show up in behaviour. If he only came days ago, he has been through a lot. There is a tendency with (big) horses to consider the veterinary issues, but write off ponies as just being 'naughty'.
Thank you for the suggestion but he doesn't have any of the symptoms of ulcers so I think this is more down to being wildly unsettled and hating his new environment. Sigh - doesn't make you feel good as a new owner :(
 

paddi22

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Thank you for the suggestion but he doesn't have any of the symptoms of ulcers so I think this is more down to being wildly unsettled and hating his new environment. Sigh - doesn't make you feel good as a new owner :(

if it's any consolation, this happens to a huge amount of people who get a new horse and move yard! I've gone through it myself many times figuring out what has changed behaviour. so it's not you, if anything you are handling it better than most by being logical and figuring out what's going on. You have the support of the old owner which is fantastic. You sound like you have a good support network you can use there too. he sounds like he's enjoying his new environment a bit TOO much, so I wouldn't worry about him! a bit more work, a few more manners and a bit less sugar will probably sort him out!
 
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How long did the previous owners have him?
We had a pony that sounded a little like this, his problem was that he was gelded late (At 5) so when in a new place in his brain he wanted to establish his place in the pecking order so was fixated on seeing the other horses/ponies there and that was his main focus in life, everything else paled into insignificance with him which resulted in bad behaviour when you wanted him to do anything else.
I put him on rigcalm which helped alot, he also settled down into a routine over a number of weeks once he knew he couldn't get away with certain things and just got used to the new location and less fixated on his place in the herd.
 

Winters100

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Sounds as if you are doing all the right things. Spring is a funny time for horses, sometimes the most laid back ones have silly spells.

I doubt that the problem is doping or withholding of water - if the previous owner has offered to take pony back then they sound genuine.

I would say keep in touch with the previous owner, sort out the saddle and see how you get on with the new yard. If you think he needs more work maybe look for a gutsy child who would like some riding from time to time.

Good luck and I hope that you will soon be letting us know that you have the perfect pony!
 
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Sounds like he's enjoying the spring grass which could have upset his digestive system if he's been stabled for months. Rather than testing for ulcers, try a Probiotic such as Gut Balancer and keep using throughout the new move.

Everything else you are doing including saddle refit sounds fine. He will also be fit coming from a riding school so the lack of work will also have an impact. If he's out 24/7 I wouldn't give him any hard feed at all.
Thank you
 
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How long did the previous owners have him?
We had a pony that sounded a little like this, his problem was that he was gelded late (At 5) so when in a new place in his brain he wanted to establish his place in the pecking order so was fixated on seeing the other horses/ponies there and that was his main focus in life, everything else paled into insignificance with him which resulted in bad behaviour when you wanted him to do anything else.
I put him on rigcalm which helped alot, he also settled down into a routine over a number of weeks once he knew he couldn't get away with certain things and just got used to the new location and less fixated on his place in the herd.
He was there for 6 years and was always middle ranked in the herd. I will look into rigcalm, thank you. I'm waiting for a magnesium based calmer to arrive so hoping that will also help
 
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Sounds as if you are doing all the right things. Spring is a funny time for horses, sometimes the most laid back ones have silly spells.

I doubt that the problem is doping or withholding of water - if the previous owner has offered to take pony back then they sound genuine.

I would say keep in touch with the previous owner, sort out the saddle and see how you get on with the new yard. If you think he needs more work maybe look for a gutsy child who would like some riding from time to time.

Good luck and I hope that you will soon be letting us know that you have the perfect pony!
Thank you :) I hope so too and will certainly report back x
 

brighteyes

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Look up Redmone on here! You'll have to back a loooong way but she had some famously challenging times with their (older) pony and overcame the many different problems and mixed advice. Dolly was the love of their lives, and they were straight novices when they bought her. Truly, she came right round - eventually!

Sorry to hear of the disaster hack but some ponies can get very institutionalised and it sounds like yours has had a huge change to his routine. 10 days is nothing at all in the re-establishing of everything he knows. What if he had a special friend or pair bond he is really missing? Nobody takes this into account, and it mystifies me somewhat, although they do make new friends quickly. Welshies are sparky and a B has the extra refinement and blood, so expect it to surface now and again.
Be VERY watchful of the grass and at 18 Cushing's will be lurking and causing hormonal problems you'll need to deal with in the autumn and winter. Do NOT let him get fat, or you'll have another set of problems to deal with - exercise is you ally in all of this.

It's reassuring to know the previous owner is willing to take him back if all else fails. Take a step away and understand he is a living creature and doesn't realise you have all your hopes and dreams piled on his back. Literally. I have always had Welshies and they are awesome. Ours is 21 now and still a handful but the most wonderful boy.
Good luck and don't panic. Let us know how it goes with the new yard.
 
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Look up Redmone on here! You'll have to back a loooong way but she had some famously challenging times with their (older) pony and overcame the many different problems and mixed advice. Dolly was the love of their lives, and they were straight novices when they bought her. Truly, she came right round - eventually!

Sorry to hear of the disaster hack but some ponies can get very institutionalised and it sounds like yours has had a huge change to his routine. 10 days is nothing at all in the re-establishing of everything he knows. What if he had a special friend or pair bond he is really missing? Nobody takes this into account, and it mystifies me somewhat, although they do make new friends quickly. Welshies are sparky and a B has the extra refinement and blood, so expect it to surface now and again.
Be VERY watchful of the grass and at 18 Cushing's will be lurking and causing hormonal problems you'll need to deal with in the autumn and winter. Do NOT let him get fat, or you'll have another set of problems to deal with - exercise is you ally in all of this.

It's reassuring to know the previous owner is willing to take him back if all else fails. Take a step away and understand he is a living creature and doesn't realise you have all your hopes and dreams piled on his back. Literally. I have always had Welshies and they are awesome. Ours is 21 now and still a handful but the most wonderful boy.
Good luck and don't panic. Let us know how it goes with the new yard.
What a lovely message. i completely agree and am trying so hard to do the best for him. He is enjoying the grass but isn't fat yet - and I am monitoring this. Thank you x
 
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Having worked at a RS 'light work' could well mean 2 hour long lessons/hacks a day! Even horses in truly light work at a RS will be ridden pretty much every day for an hour - it is a different meaning to light work in a private home. A horse only doing 2 or 3 hours work a week just isn't worth the stable space for most RS.
10 days is not much time at all - it's worrying when they change completely from what you see at the trial but that pony is still there, and is probably needing a combination of well fitting tack, enough work and feeling settled and at home to bring him out again. My new horse was very unsettled when we got her, the first few days she bucked, tanked off, was nasty to tack up, bolshy on the ground... although the behaviour did start to improve we then moved yards and it was the best thing for her. She still had her moments in the first month but she chilled out immediately after we moved. Some yards just have a better 'vibe' for the horses.
 

Lois Lame

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11 May 2018
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649
Just be aware that when trying a horse if it is very quiet and withdrawn it may not necessarily be doped but water could well have been withheld which results in calmer behaviour simply due to its dehydrated nature. It's a very old trick that dealers have used in the past.

That's why its essential to see a horse/pony loose in its usual stable and check it has access to water (along with checking at the same time that its not been crib biting and it doesn't windsuck or weave.) The same goes with it's field or paddock, check water has not been withheld.
I havn't read all the thread yet, but I'd just like to add to add...

I read here on H&H forum in the recent past that not only does one have to check that water is available, one also has to check that salt hasn't been put in it. I thought it very interesting as I had not until then heard of the water-withholding trick or the adding-of-salt-so-horse-won't-drink-it trick).

BTW, I don't think any of this applies to your fellow, OP.
 
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