Please help us - first time owners rehomed a rottie

CorvusCorax

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I've taken on a couple of older dogs and none of them were 'traumatised'. Some adjusted better than others and one in particular would have gone with anyone, the big tart. We were her third home and she was just happy out, didn't matter who she was with, or where she was. And then of course my mother has lamented the fact that our other dogs were not as perfect as she was, ever since...
 

ester

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I don't read that the OP is complaining that he isn't behaving perfectly, she has said quite the opposite really?

He may be sensitive based on breed generalisations but individuals are differnet so we we don't truely know that, so no I wouldn't consider that a fact. And as CC says not all dogs are traumatised by a rehome, I may not have done it myself but know a fair few who have appeared to be very happy straight off. So again, no, not really fact.
 

Levrier

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Yeah I?ve taken on rather more than a couple CC, and all of them were.

I hope I don?t need to explain to you that just because this doesn?t manifest itself as (for example) destructive behaviour, barking etc doesn?t mean it isn?t there? Older dogs that are re-homed can just shut down in the same way people do - it?s only months later when they relax and begin to feel comfortable that you realise how much they?ve changed

My first rescue greyhound was a good example of this - she was laid back, quiet, obedient and would have gone with anyone from the start, she didn?t put a paw wrong. It was only later on when she regained her happy personality that we realised how much she had changed
 

Levrier

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I don't read that the OP is complaining that he isn't behaving perfectly, she has said quite the opposite really?

He may be sensitive based on breed generalisations but individuals are differnet so we we don't truely know that, so no I wouldn't consider that a fact. And as CC says not all dogs are traumatised by a rehome, I may not have done it myself but know a fair few who have appeared to be very happy straight off. So again, no, not really fact.
And you have hit the nail on the head there ?appeared to be?.....
 

WorkingGSD

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To me, it is pretty obvious that any dog would be traumatised by being re-homed surely?

For myself I know from repeated experience that a rescue dog takes 6-12 months to really settle into a new home, which is why I find it incomprehensible when people (not just the OP) complain after a couple of days that the dog is not behaving perfectly
That is not my experience. I have found dogs to be reassuringly adaptable and seem to often seamlessly go from one home to another without any trauma. Of course much will depend upon the early experiences of the dog and also the home he finds himself in.
 

ester

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And you have hit the nail on the head there “appeared to be”.....
Well quite, I used that knowingly as I couldn't ask them outright. But they showed no signs, subtle or otherwise of having an issue and didn't change after an extended period of time. So as far as anyone could tell they were unaffected.

The horse took a year to settle in properly, I wouldn't describe him as traumatised though or the settling in period a particularly traumatising experience.
 

Pearlsasinger

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I've taken on a couple of older dogs and none of them were 'traumatised'. Some adjusted better than others and one in particular would have gone with anyone, the big tart. We were her third home and she was just happy out, didn't matter who she was with, or where she was. And then of course my mother has lamented the fact that our other dogs were not as perfect as she was, ever since...
We rehomed a Labrador dog, about 12 months old, who had grown too big for showing. We were his 4th home, his 3rd had been in a 1st floor flat where he howled all day while the owners were out at work (surprise, surprise). After careful introduction, we put him in the kennel with our 2 Lab bitches overnight. He broke out and came to sit on the doorstep, while the other two went to explore the village! He wasn't traumatised at all, just wanted to be in the house. He was a lovely dog and lived with us until he was 14.

I must admit I wouldn't have recommended a Rottie as a 1st dog, wonderful as they are. One of ours is very vocal, she 'talks' a lot. The other purses her lips and makes a sound like wolf, if she thinks something is going on outside that shouldn't be.
I had a Lab who never thought that it was safe for me to be cooking, she always wanted to be able to keep an eye on me, if there was anything hot around.
OP, your dog sounds to be behaving perfectly normally while he gets to know you and your routine. I hope you feel more settled soon.
 
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I don't think there's anything unusual about your reaction, OP; I felt a bit the same when we acquired our dogs. It is a big change in lifestyle - you do need to consider the dog when making plans all the time, how long will it be left for, etc, and it's always there in your house. It is still early days. Concentrate on all the good things you can do with the dog, walks, games etc.
 

Levrier

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Well quite, I used that knowingly as I couldn't ask them outright. But they showed no signs, subtle or otherwise of having an issue and didn't change after an extended period of time. So as far as anyone could tell they were unaffected.

The horse took a year to settle in properly, I wouldn't describe him as traumatised though or the settling in period a particularly traumatising experience.
So sorry, I didn't realise I had to give a scientifically proved definition of every opinion I put forward....
 
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Did you get this boy from one of the established Rottweiler rescues? We're had Rottweilers for over three decades and couldn't imagine being without a pack at home. However, I'm the first to suggest they aren't a dog for a first time owner. As someone said previously, they are known talkers which I love, but it can be seen as intimidating. Add to this a sensitive, loyal nature and they can be very unsettled if they lose a home.
He sounds a good dog in the making, if he can be left overnight in the kitchen already. I'm sure he would come right and be a great family dog, if, he is wanted.
If he is from Rottie Welfare or Rottweiler rescue, I suggest you have an honest conversation with them as soon as possible. This dogs welfare must come first, he didn't have a say in this situation.
When things go wrong for large guarding breeds, it frequently ends very badly for the dog. Don't take him another rung down that short slippery slope.
 

ester

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So sorry, I didn't realise I had to give a scientifically proved definition of every opinion I put forward....
Why are you being so shirty with me because my experience is different to yours and I'm just trying to explain why I said what I have?
 

Pearlsasinger

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Did you get this boy from one of the established Rottweiler rescues? We're had Rottweilers for over three decades and couldn't imagine being without a pack at home. However, I'm the first to suggest they aren't a dog for a first time owner. As someone said previously, they are known talkers which I love, but it can be seen as intimidating. Add to this a sensitive, loyal nature and they can be very unsettled if they lose a home.
He sounds a good dog in the making, if he can be left overnight in the kitchen already. I'm sure he would come right and be a great family dog, if, he is wanted.
If he is from Rottie Welfare or Rottweiler rescue, I suggest you have an honest conversation with them as soon as possible. This dogs welfare must come first, he didn't have a say in this situation.
When things go wrong for large guarding breeds, it frequently ends very badly for the dog. Don't take him another rung down that short slippery slope.
Even if he isn't from one of the Rottie rescue places, if you decide not to keep him, I suggest that, rather than sending him back to where you got him, you contact one of the 'official' Rottweiler rescues, they have a lot of experience in rehoming to the best home.
 

amymay

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Even if he isn't from one of the Rottie rescue places, if you decide not to keep him, I suggest that, rather than sending him back to where you got him, you contact one of the 'official' Rottweiler rescues, they have a lot of experience in rehoming to the best home.
If it's come from a rescue it will have been rehomed under contract and must go back to that rescue.
 

Levrier

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Why are you being so shirty with me because my experience is different to yours and I'm just trying to explain why I said what I have?
Because in my opinion you are being unnecessarily pedantic in your replies and because you are commenting on something you have no personal experience of, which I always find frustrating?
 

ester

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The reason I commented was because I do have personal experience of feeling like the OP, in similar situations and as such I felt for her.

I'm sorry if you think I am unnecessarily pedantic in my replies but I can't really stop being me, it isn't personal I just like to be accurate to ensure the best understanding in both directions. TBH it's quite upsetting for me when anyone brings it up as I do my best but I am a bit stuck with it.
 

Levrier

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The reason I commented was because I do have personal experience of feeling like the OP, in similar situations and as such I felt for her.

I'm sorry if you think I am unnecessarily pedantic in my replies but I can't really stop being me, it isn't personal I just like to be accurate to ensure the best understanding in both directions. TBH it's quite upsetting for me when anyone brings it up as I do my best but I am a bit stuck with it.
I was going to PM you but I think this needs to be public - I truly apologise Ester, I have had a rubbish day at work which has made me short-tempered and I have 'taken it out' on the forum. I'm sorry that you had to suffer the brunt of my short-temperedness (if that is a word) - I fully realise what a horrible inadequate person that makes me, and I am not proud of my attitude tonight :( I really am very sorry.
 

ester

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No worries, I'm a bit fragile atm too so prob not the best of combinations together right now! x maybe I shouldn't have asked but I was genuinely a bit confused what was occurring. I do try to rein the pedanticness in as I know it can be irritating!


pancakes all round? :)
 

Pearlsasinger

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If it's come from a rescue it will have been rehomed under contract and must go back to that rescue.
That will depend on the rescue and we don't know if it came from an organisation or a private home. I once rehomed a Labx bitch who had originally been a RSPCA rescue. No-one informed the RSPCA, as far as I know.
 

Bojingles

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OP, if your feelings are that strong, I think you should send the dog back. It would be kinder than keeping him in a home that isn't working out for any of you. I have done this myself and the dog in question went on to have a wonderful home and a much better life than I could ever have offered him. At the risk of the wrath of Rottie fans, I don't think he's the easiest first dog you could have got either. Seriously, if he's making you and your partner unhappy, send him back so he can find a more suitable home. There's no shame in this; it's obvious, common sense.
 
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