Pros and Cons Native/Cob vs Warmblood/Thoroughbred/arab vs Part bred

WestCoast

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So. . . I've got the money together, husband on side, getting lessons to get my riding up to scratch, starting looking at livery yards. So now I need to think about what sort of horse I should get. Probably early next year.

Most of my experience as a teenager (27 years ago) is with what can only be described as stroppy cobs, but did do some schooling with a friend's nervous arab who she was too scared to jump. Lots of hacking, a little jumping/cross country/point to point and a fair amount of drag hunting. Dealt with most vices and would like to avoid again ;).

I'm really most interested in getting a kind tempered, keen to please, forward going horse who I can treat well, school and hack and maybe do some cross country/drag hunting or even a bit of very novice dressage or eventing.

I'm 9 stone and 5' 3" so could potentially go from 14.2hh upwards and I do love something like a Welsh Section D. But looking at full livery so I could equally go for something posher or a part bred. Absolutely adore Fresians, but suspect that might be a difficult dream and temperment and being sound so much more important to me than looks. Potentially I could have a budget of 5-7K, but that doesn't mean my horse has to cost that much - preferably less. I would have find someone expereinced to go with me and have a very good relationship with my local vet so he could find me a good horse vet to do the vetting.

Another alternative might be to loan a schoolmaster for a year or two and then fulfill the teenage dream of bringing on a youngster.

Paula
 

Slightlyconfused

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To behonest all breeds have their quirks, it's temperament rather than breed i look at.....for example my sisters 13year old, been out of racing 3yrs, exracer is the breaks for my scatty 21year old welsh d :eek: people look at me like im mad when i say that from what your say you might want to do i'd look at tbx with a heaver horse or ish.
 

be positive

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Unless your plans include showing in breed specific classes, I would focus on the temperament, ability to do its job and something that appeals when you look at the adverts.

For your budget you could find a nicely produced but not yet fully developed horse around 6- 7 years old, this would enable you to bring it on further but in the knowledge that it had enough experience to enjoy from day one, this sort of horse is hard to find but in my view would suit you well.

If you go on comp riders nikib (I think) has just done her first comp on her new purchase which would be the type I think you could be looking for, he is called Cameo, grey gelding about 15.2 a really smart little horse that has had a very good start.

Take your time when you start looking, have a list and stick to the main points, be prepared to compromise on some and get someone to go with you, if you can as two pairs of eyes are better than one.
 

WestCoast

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Am looking at yards between Kenilworth, Solihull and Marston Green (behind birmingham airport). I could travel to find the right horse, but it's certainly easier and more likely to be word of mouth local.

I'm not loaded by the way, but have an endowment policy I took out over 20 years ago coming out, and while it's traditional to spend this on a new car or conservatory I have a better idea :D. If the horse costs less then I have more for livery costs.

Paula
 

WestCoast

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I obviously will need to do some serious thinking. Just a horse that doesn't bite me like the riding school one did last week would be nice :)
 

Littlelegs

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I wouldn't go off breed, I'd consider anything really that's suitable for what you need ability & temperament wise. I have known 10yr old reasonably well bred sports horses & ex racers that would suit you down to the ground from what you've said, & native ponies that would destroy your confidence. That said, I think connie x tb or full connies are fantastic unless you plan on top level affiliated competing, which few people do. They tend to be easy to care for & safe to hack & handle like most natives but have the talent to make good little competition ponies/horses. Best of both worlds imo.
 
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Why don't you have a look on Horsemart? They have a great feature down the left hand side which allows you to pick height, type, breed, location etc. Some great horses come up - if only I was rich!

I wouldn't particularly go on breed alone, all horses are different, it's more about their personality, temperament and ability to do what you want to do.

You are lucky with your height/weight also...sometimes I would love to be able to own a 14.2!!

Good luck and keep us updated :)
 

mandwhy

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I'm with littlelegs on the connies! God I love them (especially a dun) but they're usually too small for me so you will have a whole spectrum of Irish charm at your fingertips! Or any ISH really especially if it involves ID or Connie! Exciting for you :)
 

Mongoose11

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But looking at full livery so I could equally go for something posher or a part bred.
Paula
I love the idea that you have to have a 'posh' horse to go on full livery! No coloured cobs on full livery thank you very much :D They are banished to grass livery only :)
 

Kallibear

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Are you interested in showing? If so you will want to look at breeds or types that have spoecific classes: coloured, or a native breed class. There's so much you can do with a specific breed (i.e wesh, or a highland) simpley because of it's breed ;)

Do you have a perferecnce to build? Some people like really heavy horses, so very fine. I really like the MW hunter types.

A heavier more native type will be cheaper to keep: less feed, less rugs and less accident prone (big fine things are constantly hurting themselves!)

Also think about transport because there is no point have a top quality competition horse if you can't take it anywhere! A trailer will set you about about 2K, which may affect your horse budget.

Above all I'd go for something EASY, regardless of looks. Sensible and laid back that you can go and DO stuff with and have fun. Doesn't matter how beautiful and talented the horse is if it's too highly strung to be much use.!
 
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I agree you should pick the individual and not just the breed,but all the same one has to start somewhere.
Have you considered something like a fell or dales pony? The Fell Pony Society discourages describing fells as 'mini-Friesians' but that alone tells you something...I rode a Fell for the first time a few months back and was very impressed. They say you cannot put a Fell to the wrong job :D
 

teazle

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Absolutely don't go just off breed. I swore I wouldn't get a TBxHan and what did I end up with? She was just advertised as warmblood so I fell in love before knowing her breeding!

Of course, I also said I'd get a gelding..........

You should be able to get a lovely horse for your money though. Good luck!
 

WestCoast

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Lots of great advice thank you. I feel a bit silly not knowing exactly what I want - sort of "want horssy" really.

Showing a M&M actually sounds quite like fun. Gonna need a trailer though if I want to do that.

I think I may be leaning towards share/loan initially to give me more time to improve my riding and decide what I really want.

Paula
 

matt_m

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Go by individual horse and not breed I would say, if you like the look/sound of an advert then pursue it and see if it is right for you. That's all I can say.
 

Flame_

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Get whatever you fancy breed wise. Have a real think about what your "type" is, you might need to try a few before you work it out. Otherwise this is brilliant advice

Above all I'd go for something EASY, regardless of looks. Sensible and laid back that you can go and DO stuff with and have fun. Doesn't matter how beautiful and talented the horse is if it's too highly strung to be much use.!
And have fun looking. :)
 

WestCoast

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All great advice. I think I'm going to try to find a 5* yard and then see if I can get a schoolmaster on loan for a year. Then I will have a lot more choice and not risk under/over horsing myself.

Paula
 

JFTD-WS

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Showing a M&M actually sounds quite like fun. Gonna need a trailer though if I want to do that.
A nice highland would leave you money in your budget for a trailer too :p

Most folk on here have some bias - can't help but think other owners are mad for not wanting whichever wonderful breed we have / are most attached to :p Ultimately what you want will be dictated by what job you want the pony to do, and how you want to keep it, in addition to your personal preferences.

A loan or share would certainly give you some idea, or try to get some breed specific riding experience (e.g. the treking centres with Clydies/highlands / studs where you can ride PREs etc). Or just sit down and really think about what you see yourself doing with the pony in 5 years time - where you'd like to be, and what you think is realistic. Then people can advise you more fully, and you can look to see what other people's horses of similar breeds/types are doing, at the relevant breed societies, or whether you're looking for something where breed really doesn't matter!
 

WestCoast

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A nice highland would leave you money in your budget for a trailer too :p

. . . Or just sit down and really think about what you see yourself doing with the pony in 5 years time - where you'd like to be, and what you think is realistic.
I love highlands - in fact I think it would be dead cool in a livery yard full of warm blood dressage horses. ;)

In five years I will be 50 - at which point I may well be joining the dressage riders. Untill then I'd like to do lots of hacking, and maybe some cross country. Actually seems finding a livery yard with decent off road hacking will be most difficult. Phoned two that couldn't even get through to today. :(

Paula
 
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I love the idea that you have to have a 'posh' horse to go on full livery! No coloured cobs on full livery thank you very much :D They are banished to grass livery only :)
haha i smirked at this too...i reckon a fair few coloured cobs that are safe and reliable at all times are worth far more in monetary value than alot of other "posh" horses that cant be ridden on the road for fear of spooking etc...
 

WestCoast

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I agree, as someone already pointed out what I need is a nice natured, willing horse that I can actually go and do things on.
 

Kat

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I would split your budget and buy a trailer too since you have a hefty budget. You will have much more fun if you can get out and about!

I wouldn't worry about breed unless you want to show. If you want to show in breed classes then you will need a papered pure breed. But you can show horses of mixed or unknown breeding in "type" classes, hacks, hunters etc.

Basically I would think about what is important to you and forget breeding. Focus on getting something that meets your other criteria and see what breed it is!
 

LollyDolly

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In five years I will be 50 - at which point I may well be joining the dressage riders.
Hey I am only eighteen and I've been dressaging forever! It's not just for older people, you'd be surprised how fit you have to be! Schooling and training for dressage takes years, I have frequently had hour long lessons where I was in trot for 90% of the lesson, talk about ankle swelling!
Also, dressage is certainly not for the older rider when you are competing your riggy, hot-headed, 17.2 ISH :cool:
 

JFTD-WS

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I love highlands - in fact I think it would be dead cool in a livery yard full of warm blood dressage horses. ;)

In five years I will be 50 - at which point I may well be joining the dressage riders. Untill then I'd like to do lots of hacking, and maybe some cross country. Actually seems finding a livery yard with decent off road hacking will be most difficult. Phoned two that couldn't even get through to today. :(

Paula
There's not much a good highland can't turn a hoof to ;) I regularly rock up to do dressage (and other things) with mine, we stand out a bit amongst the wbs!

his first time xc schooling...


first time at PC / 3rd time xc (with dafthoss riding)
 

WestCoast

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Hey I am only eighteen and I've been dressaging forever! It's not just for older people, you'd be surprised how fit you have to be! Schooling and training for dressage takes years, I have frequently had hour long lessons where I was in trot for 90% of the lesson, talk about ankle swelling!
Also, dressage is certainly not for the older rider when you are competing your riggy, hot-headed, 17.2 ISH :cool:
Sorry - I didn't quite mean that how it sounded. I know dressage is damn hard work, just it's a little less likely that you will end up in a ditch. That said I seem to remember that they may me try dressage on my stroppy cob at pony club camp 30 years ago. He merrily walked and trotted round and then when I moved into canter he jumped sideways over the little fence and headed back to the yard flat out. . . Yup that was embarrassing.
 

WestCoast

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There's not much a good highland can't turn a hoof to ;) I regularly rock up to do dressage (and other things) with mine, we stand out a bit amongst the wbs!

his first time xc schooling...


first time at PC / 3rd time xc (with dafthoss riding)
What a sweetheart - I am soooo jealous.

Paula
 

evj

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Good advice about not going on breed alone, I was looking for big, sensible and kind for my first horse and now have a very lovely Friesian :) we have our little issues but that's not down to his breed.
 
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