Protein levels for puppies?

emma21

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I was told by breeder that high protein was the way to go but vet says low protein?

I always thought low aswell but can anyone help!

Also what food would you recommend?

Puppy in question...Dumbo...
 

CorvusCorax

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For large, late maturing breeds, I would err on the side of caution with protein.
Bear in mind the QUALITY of the protein is very important.
I would steer well clear of *some* of the large breed dry puppy foods with rocket-fuel levels of protein, the source of which is unspecified.
Protein should come from meat and fish, IMO. Tripe is a great thing to feed IMO.
If large, weightbearing breeds shoot up too fast, you store up huge problems in later life.
Although I am sure others will disagree :p
 
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Toffee44

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When we first got Dylan in Dec he was just on the Bakers and butchers puppy mix (yes I know....) However I then went and did some research on dog food, hence why I am now on raw. I put him on autarky puppy and threw the Bakers away until convinced OH about raw feeding. It needs to be the right protein aka not meal, deritives (sp?). When he was on puppy food he shot up and went very lanky. Now he is on raw hes weight is about 35kg and is 23" at the shoulder, hes smaller than some dogs (rottweiler down the road same age) his age but the same weight and hes not over weight. So I would find a puppy food with lower protein and give you puppy raw sources of protein, chicken wings, raw fresh tripe, animal hearts. Never again I will rely on just puppy food.

This month has been tight for us what with the hay and a couple of vet bills etc and I worked extra shifts which meant I missed my landywoods delivery, so they are on Skinners duck and rice at the moment but Dylan is still getting green tripe (Fresh stuff).
 

emma21

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I did look at raw feeding but may well consider it alot more when hes abit older...

For large, late maturing breeds, I would err on the side of caution with protein.
Bear in mind the QUALITY of the protein is very important.
I would steer well clear of *some* of the large breed dry puppy foods with rocket-fuel levels of protein, the source of which is unspecified.
Protein should come from meat and fish, IMO. Tripe is a great thing to feed IMO.
If large, weightbearing breeds shoot up too fast, you store up huge problems in later life.
Although I am sure others will disagree :p
Thats what i thought... like royal canin giant pup - 34%?!?!?! is it just me or is that ridiculous?

At the moment hes on barking heads large puppy which is 24% but might go for arden grange large pup at 26%? what do you think?
 

MydnightShadow

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My first choice would be RAW. I am using Natural Instinct at the moment, I know it is not cheap but at least I am sure they are getting a balanced and complete diet. They do puppy food and will give you any advice you need.

http://www.naturalinstinct.com/

My second choice if I was feeding dry and was happy spending mid-range money would be Symply. Again they do a puppy food and a large breed puppy food.

http://www.symplypetfoods.co.uk/

Here is a bit of what they say:

All Symply dog foods are made in the UK – we’re proud of that fact.
All Symply dog foods are free from artificial colourings, flavourings and preservatives
Our highest quality ingredients are gentler on the stomach and more easily digested
Higher levels of Omega-6 helps maintain a healthy skin and a shiny coat
High meat content provides all the protein for healthy and strong muscles
Our dog foods are free of ‘wheat gluten’, a well known cause of allergies in dogs
Our Salmon is sourced from the Highlands of Scotland
Our lambs are meadow raised in the UK
None of the turkeys in our foods are caged or battery farmed
Quality ingredients mean more goodness per crunch - feed less and save money

If you are looking for a new natural dog food or perhaps your pet suffers from itching, scratching, intolerances or other similar conditions, switch to Symply – we absolutely guarantee results.
 

soloabe

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It depends what you class as high.
I would not feed 24% that is really low for me.
The protein.needs to come.from a named meat meal and no grains. You need to pay attention to the calcium and phosphate ratio much more than protein.
 

s4sugar

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It does rather put me off a food when they make claims that although not exactly false are designed to prey on peoples sensibilities eg;-

"None of the turkeys in our foods are caged or battery farmed" - Turkeys are not caged in the UK.
Our Salmon is sourced from the Highlands of Scotland - don't salmon live in water?
Our lambs are meadow raised in the UK - Meadows are not the best place for sheep and this would give welfare issues.

A bit like stating that a cabbage is suitable for vegetarians!

Isn't there a saying that starts -If you can't blind them with science........
 

emma21

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Katielou- what % would you be looking for then? Or what food do you suggest?

Didn't even think of calcium etc but I guess that makes alot I sense re. Bone growth etc what should they be?

Sorry! Just want to do it right! :)
 

Alec Swan

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Whilst I think that there are certain breeds, or types of dogs which will be more tolerant of high levels of protein than others, I would be very worried about high protein levels, for growing pups, in general. Coupled with that, I would also worry about any additional growth supplements.

I'm not a dietician, by any stretch of the imagination, but would also be suspicious of those who were and are employed within some of the feed manufacturers conglomerates.

For many years now, I've fed what I suppose are cereal based feeds, and if I'm honest, I suppose that it's just laziness on my part! In my defence though, kitchen scraps are added, on a regular basis, so I suppose that my dogs do get a balanced diet, sort of! They seem to look well enough, and give me a day's work. For those with the inclination, a meat based diet has to be the better way for all dogs, and most certainly for growing puppies.

There will be those breeds which have a predisposition to growth problems, one being OCD, and there is no doubt, whatsoever, that high protein diets linked to additional topping up with additives, are to a very large extent, making the problem so much worse.

If we are to listen to the advice of breeders, then first we need to decide whether the breeder's opinion is worth listening to. Some most certainly are, but all so many aren't. If I hear one more breeder, tell an unsuspecting puppy owner, that their new charge "Needs to be given every chance to reach its full growth potential" and then backs this up with advice which will almost certainly lead to future problems, then I'm going to scream!

I'm sure that many will disagree with me, but the puppies diet is of vital importance, in my view. It supports, or doesn't, a dog and for the rest of its days.

Alec.
 
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