Thoroughbreds? Ex Racers?

ihatework

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 September 2004
Messages
17,179
Feet can hugely change out of racing. My Gray lad now has the feet of a Shetland pony and hasn't worn shoes for year.

A different feed regime and the fact they aren't galloping everyday putting hard concussion into feet really makes a huge difference. So does a change of farrier. Many that work in racing yards just slap shoes on and make the foot fit the shoe.
For sure, but that will have taken their toll on their feet and how they hold themselves and move. The gamble is how much of that is reversible long term even if the feet visually improve.
 

paddi22

Well-Known Member
Joined
5 December 2010
Messages
4,680
I'd agree with that Elf. My boy is working barefoot on broken up roads with no issues, it took a year but his feet are like rocks now.

.
sorry to butt in but I have a two your old tb now that I'd like to get to that stage. if you got a chance would you pm any feed or sups you found useful, would love to get this lad started out right. he's on farriers formula at the moment.
 

Bonnie Allie

Well-Known Member
Joined
11 June 2019
Messages
137
Love the ex-racers. In the Southern Hemisphere our horses live out far more than in the UK. This in their early years seems to prevent the breakdowns later in their careers you are all talking about.

Both of ours were really tough to keep weight on but they lived to 28 and 29 respectively. Long happy lives, one raced until he was 7 and surprisingly didn’t break down physically but he was mentally wrecked when he came to us. His quirks from racing never left him so we had to have a fair few strategies to manage his fears when we were at comps.
 

ycbm

Well-Known Member
Joined
30 January 2015
Messages
28,095
sorry to butt in but I have a two your old tb now that I'd like to get to that stage. if you got a chance would you pm any feed or sups you found useful, would love to get this lad started out right. he's on farriers formula at the moment.

Happy to go public so everyone knows. Farriers formula has added iron and manganese and for most British grazing that's a bad idea because they already have too much. They prevent the uptake of copper and that disrupts insulin use and that causes poor sugar management and bad foot quality. I personal supplement copper, zinc and magnesium, and yea-sacc, but for ease unless you penny pinch like me 😄, I would swap to one of the four no iron/manganese high copper supplements. Forage Plus, Progressive Earth, Equimins and one other i forget the name of but someone will remind us.

As much work on flat tarmac as you can both tolerate. If I'd done more, I could have got him there quicker. I would be taking a two year old out for walks on the roads in hand.

Try not to trim much until everyone including him is absolutely sure what shape foot he wants. Mine now clearly grows his spiraled in from the outside, but his landing is spot on level laterally and nicely heel first.
 
Last edited:

paddi22

Well-Known Member
Joined
5 December 2010
Messages
4,680
Happy to go public so everyone knows. Farriers formula has added iron and manganese and for most British grazing that's a bad idea because they already have too much. They prevent the uptake of copper and that disrupts insulin use and that causes poor sugar management and bad foot quality. I personal spent copper, zinc and magnesium, and yea-sacc, but for ease unless you penny pinch like me 😄, I would swap to one of the four no iron/manganese high copper supplements. Forage Plus, Progressive Earth, Equimins and one other i forget the name of but someone will remind us.

As much work on flat tarmac as you can both tolerate. If I'd done more, I could have got him there quicker. I would be taking a two year old out for deals on the roads in hand.

Try not to trim much until everyone including him is absolutely sure what shape foot he wants. Mine now clearly grows his spiraled in from the outside, but his landing is spot on level laterally and nicely heel first.
brilliant thanks so much. interesting point about the farriers formula!.
 

PapaverFollis

Well-Known Member
Joined
13 November 2012
Messages
4,383
Equivita is the 4th one. Mine have been on it about a month and I'm sure Im already seeing improvements in their feet. Not ex-racers though. Fat cobs.
 

HobleytheTB

Well-Known Member
Joined
9 November 2018
Messages
96
A vote here for progressive earth pro hoof! Mine had very poor feet when I got her, but that and a decent, regular farrier has turned things around to the point that there are no issues there at all now.

Having said that, the bloody thing is lame again now, so ignore my previous post on this thread, ex racers are rubbish!!
 

mule

Well-Known Member
Joined
27 October 2016
Messages
6,254
I was wondering before, for people who like tb's for their athleticism but are worried about unsoundness would an Arab not be a better buy? They are athletic, sensitive, and smart like a tb but hardy🤷
 

HLOEquestrian

Well-Known Member
Joined
27 December 2010
Messages
167
Location
West Sussex
I’ve been riding / borrowing my friends ex racer for the past 3 years now, he’s 8 this year. He raced once as a 2yo, she got him from a racehorse rehoming place, I believe he was then re-started as a 4yo.

He’s absolutely lovely, super talented, he’s working at elementary/ towards medium now, has a good jump, hacks out. His feet are great, shod in front only. He can be a little sharp in the winter but he’s honestly one of the bravest horses I’ve ever ridden and tries his heart out every single time. He’s fantastic at shows.

I hadn’t had much to do with exracers before but I would definitely now consider getting my own one day. Afraid I can’t comment much on how he was restarted and how they found him as I didn’t know her then.
 

Northern

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 February 2013
Messages
625
So how do you pick one that isn’t likely to break down?
Good conformation is a good first step, then luck, then good fences, then more luck. If I were to get another I would want every inch x-rayed before saying yay or nay. As it would cost more than the horse to do that, it would need to be a reaaalllyy special one!

The TB market is weird here, you either have those that go for <$1k (~500 pounds) or you have those that have been bought up cheap, had side reins and bandages whacked on for a few weeks, and end up being advertised for >$5k.
 

K95

Well-Known Member
Joined
15 June 2019
Messages
112
I haven’t read the thread so possibly repeating. But like everything there’s good and bad. I’d definitely go to a reputable ex racer seller to ensure the horse is sound etc. My ex racer is a dream, not ridden him yet but he’s the most gentle kind horse, very well handled. A friend of mine has about 7 too and they’re all amazing. Yes some can be ‘crazy’ but same for any horse. Get a good one (or be willing the pit the work in) and they’re fabulous
 
Top