Rant - The Current Dog 'Pandemic'

splashgirl45

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so sorry bonny, its hard to lose them when they are old but 5 is no age at all...glad you have another little one to love. i also got a puppy who is a mix of 3 breeds and she was the runt and no one wanted her. she was a tiny weak little thing and i went with my heart not my head. i recently lost my old collie so i am glad i got her as a companion to my other terrier..
 

Loubidy

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If it was possible, I think you should have to sit some sort of test to get a licence before you are allowed any animal.

I cannot get my head round how people can just give them up, don't get me wrong Penguin is a pain in the a$$ sometimes and definitely has selective hearing and I absolutely should have done a better job of training her (woops - we're working on it) but from the moment she came home she became a priority in my life - as is my horse. It honestly baffles me that folk can look at their pet and think nah not for me anymore (obviously there are some circumstances where people don't have a choice I do not mean all). I just can't understand how people can see animals as disposable?

I was extremely lucky that my dog was bred by a friend of mine so have known her since the day she was born, she's a JRT but no fancy breeding, I know both parents and no known health issues, I know the vets they use and the lifestyle. Yes, she is a lockdown puppy, there were no puppy classes but I did what I could to socialise - we went to the park on the weekends to see lots of other dogs and small people who wanted to pet her.

I don't see an issue with crossbreeding when done for the right reasons, plenty of KC breeders breeding "Show quality" dogs with disgusting health issues as a result. £3k for a puppy is obscene and alienates a lot of potentially great homes but I can totally see why people would do it, not many ways you can make £20k that easily and most folk probably think they can vet out the good homes just sad that people are very good liars.
 

CorvusCorax

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I think there's a bit of a difference between getting a dog during the lockdown and getting a dog/breeding puppies **because** of the lockdown (at home, bit bored, everyone else is doing it etc).
I got a dog last year but I've owned her father since he was 14 weeks old, both parents have health tests, working qualifications and show grades and so does every other dog in the pedigree, which I know, because I can look the pedigree up on a database and I know a lot of the dogs behind them. All pups spoken for before birth.
None of these things are guarantees, but they do help. Or you can just hit and hope.
 

coblets

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Someone I work with got a puppy yesterday as she promised it to her son - a Cockerpoo. But a "pedigree one" She is already complaining about the smell......
Reading this makes me feel really sad. Fair enough if you don't like the smell of dogs or dealing with poo or whatever, and fair enough that a child has been clamouring on about getting a puppy because they don't know any better. But how can a fully grown adult look at the eyes of an animal, any animal at all, and not think of how they're ultimately buying a life? How can you buy a dog without discussing beforehand potential veterinary issues, how much exercise they'll need, how much time you'll need to put in to train or take to classes, what kind of diet you're going to be feeding it to make sure it grows up strong and healthy? How can you buy a dog without considering whether you're prepared for the responsibility of an animal, of being all it knows, of being the one whose decisions 100% dicate its life, of being the one who may one day have to make the call to put it to sleep?

Of course I don't know that your colleague hasn't considered all this, but your description of her makes me doubt it :(
 
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Someone I work with got a puppy yesterday as she promised it to her son - a Cockerpoo. But a "pedigree one" She is already complaining about the smell......
The smell of the dog in general?! Has she never met a dog before?
Laughed at the Pedigree, I wonder how many weeks it will be before son loses interest and it's put on FB marketplace?
 

bonny

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Reading this makes me feel really sad. Fair enough if you don't like the smell of dogs or dealing with poo or whatever, and fair enough that a child has been clamouring on about getting a puppy because they don't know any better. But how can a fully grown adult look at the eyes of an animal, any animal at all, and not think of how they're ultimately buying a life? How can you buy a dog without discussing beforehand potential veterinary issues, how much exercise they'll need, how much time you'll need to put in to train or take to classes, what kind of diet you're going to be feeding it to make sure it grows up strong and healthy? How can you buy a dog without considering whether you're prepared for the responsibility of an animal, of being all it knows, of being the one whose decisions 100% dicate its life, of being the one who may one day have to make the call to put it to sleep?

Of course I don't know that your colleague hasn't considered all this, but your description of her makes me doubt it :(
I suspect a lot of first time dog owners simply don’t realise the effort and time puppies need if they are going to grow up to be well behaved dogs.
 

TPO

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A ray of sunshine 🌞
🙈🙈🙈

I've only had personal experience of one akita and it was not good. In all my years the only dog I thought would go me for no reason. I understand that one dog doesn't represent a while breed but even still they are the last thing I would be crossed with bulldogs.

I wonder if the rate of dog attacks will sharply increase over the coming years with all this breeding, unsuitable homes/owners and the whole status thing
 

P3LH

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My issue isn’t with a dog being a crossbreed. I have just as much issue with purebreds and pedigrees too.

My issue is with dogs bred unethically, and unethical breeders.

  • Where a dog has been bred without thought to temperament, health, steadiness, mental strength, or suitability to fulfil its role (and that does encompass being a suitable pet and sane member of society!)
  • Where a dog has been bred from parents that do not have enough of the above positive qualities.
  • Where a dog has been bred from anything with four legs and a tail. Regardless of pure breed or cross breed, they should come from the best we can find - to produce either equal or better for the next generation. No, I don’t believe every dog bred needs to be a champion (and often I think many that are, probably shouldn’t be bred) but they should be the best they can be, in all aspects - and that is where competency, knowledge and understanding as a breeder is integral. Yet now, often lacking.
  • Where a litter has been bred for no real purpose other than financial gain (eg not to retain a member of the next generation. Im aware not every good breeder will always end up keeping one if there isn’t the suitable pup, but the intention should be there)
  • Where there is little or no thought, consideration, selection process or rigour on behalf of a breeder when scrutinising suitable owners and homes. Turning up with money is not enough. Wanting a dog is not enough. Some people shouldn’t own a flea. And others may be suitable dog owners, but not for all breeds.
  • Where there is insufficient expertise or knowledge from breeders on how to rear a litter appropriately, and produce the most secure and stable pups possible.
  • Where there is insufficient knowledge or even interest in the breed/type/cross they are breeding. My favourite is misspelt breed names in adverts.
  • Where there is no after support, long term support or breeder/owner relationship there.
  • Where there is a basic lack of knowledge or competence around dog breeding, genetics etc from people breeding dogs indiscriminately.
  • Where pups are being sold for outrageous money. There is no logical reason to sell pups at some of the current prices - and some of the ‘good breeders’ seem to follow this trend at times to.
  • Where pups are bred to supply demand. They are a living, breathing, beautiful thing. They should be well planned for by breeders, months or years before the mating even happens. They should be born into a suitable environment, with every contingency plan going, with someone anxiously there with an emergency first aid whelping kit / just incase, and feed bottles/ just incase. They should be raised to be confident and happy things. And they should be sold to the right people, the best and most suitable. As we can all agree, they give us so much - and make our lives so much richer for being a part of it, so all of the above really should be a basic expectation as a starting point for such treasured creatures. I wouldn’t expect anything less than the above, regardless of the breed or type of dog I was seeking.
 
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I think Akita’s are just a bit specialised -they would never be an option for me. Still, they crossed two one-person, not particularly great-with-other-dog breeds. Better than a cross with a different breed with a high prey drive and no recall? 🤔😬 you know like a Siberian cross pitt? I have seen akita cross malamutes before, someone in Wishaw was breeding them, I posted anout them a few years ago.
 
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🙈🙈🙈

I've only had personal experience of one akita and it was not good. In all my years the only dog I thought would go me for no reason. I understand that one dog doesn't represent a while breed but even still they are the last thing I would be crossed with bulldogs.

I wonder if the rate of dog attacks will sharply increase over the coming years with all this breeding, unsuitable homes/owners and the whole status thing
I definitely think it will, because not only do you have a lot of idiot owners and idiot mixes, you also have many that won't admit defeat through being stubborn - until that is they are made to because their Akita cross has someone's arm in it's mouth!

Saying that if I were to buy a dog (and had the home life to suit of course) I would probably want to buy a 'mean' looking medium/larger dog like a Doberman or an American Bulldog because I would like to be able to go out for walks across the more rural parts of the South Downs by myself, and I would feel a lot safer if I had a 'scary' looking dog with me. At the moment I only go with my OH but it feels like a crying shame. I would make sure it was a balanced, trained and friendly dog of course, I would be banking on first impressions alone.
 

P3LH

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🙈🙈🙈

I've only had personal experience of one akita and it was not good. In all my years the only dog I thought would go me for no reason. I understand that one dog doesn't represent a while breed but even still they are the last thing I would be crossed with bulldogs.

I wonder if the rate of dog attacks will sharply increase over the coming years with all this breeding, unsuitable homes/owners and the whole status thing
Prior to meeting a Caucasian shepherd, which wants to end the human race (and inspired my above point about suitability to be a pet and sane member of society!) - the only dog breed ive been unable to read the body language of was Akita’s. And if I can’t read it, I don’t want it near me. Puts me on edge.
 

skinnydipper

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Prior to meeting a Caucasian shepherd, which wants to end the human race (and inspired my above point about suitability to be a pet and sane member of society!) - the only dog breed ive been unable to read the body language of was Akita’s. And if I can’t read it, I don’t want it near me. Puts me on edge.
Two breeds I'm not particularly fond of.
 

Odyssey

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🙈🙈🙈

I've only had personal experience of one akita and it was not good. In all my years the only dog I thought would go me for no reason. I understand that one dog doesn't represent a while breed but even still they are the last thing I would be crossed with bulldogs.

I wonder if the rate of dog attacks will sharply increase over the coming years with all this breeding, unsuitable homes/owners and the whole status thing
I agree, that's a terrible cross, I'd hate to meet one of those when walking my dog! 🙄 Both very powerful breeds, which will no doubt be bought as status dogs and encouraged to be intimidating. The rate of dog attacks has definitely risen in recent years, even without all the extra out of control dogs bought during lockdown by unsuitable people, and unfortunately I'm sure they will continue to rise. If only people just bred easy to manage and train, gentle, friendly dogs that make good pets for the average dog owner!
 

fankino04

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My issue isn’t with a dog being a crossbreed. I have just as much issue with purebreds and pedigrees too.

My issue is with dogs bred unethically, and unethical breeders.

  • Where a dog has been bred without thought to temperament, health, steadiness, mental strength, or suitability to fulfil its role (and that does encompass being a suitable pet and sane member of society!)
  • Where a dog has been bred from parents that do not have enough of the above positive qualities.
  • Where a dog has been bred from anything with four legs and a tail. Regardless of pure breed or cross breed, they should come from the best we can find - to produce either equal or better for the next generation. No, I don’t believe every dog bred needs to be a champion (and often I think many that are, probably shouldn’t be bred) but they should be the best they can be, in all aspects - and that is where competency, knowledge and understanding as a breeder is integral. Yet now, often lacking.
  • Where a litter has been bred for no real purpose other than financial gain (eg not to retain a member of the next generation. Im aware not every good breeder will always end up keeping one if there isn’t the suitable pup, but the intention should be there)
  • Where there is little or no thought, consideration, selection process or rigour on behalf of a breeder when scrutinising suitable owners and homes. Turning up with money is not enough. Wanting a dog is not enough. Some people shouldn’t own a flea. And others may be suitable dog owners, but not for all breeds.
  • Where there is insufficient expertise or knowledge from breeders on how to rear a litter appropriately, and produce the most secure and stable pups possible.
  • Where there is insufficient knowledge or even interest in the breed/type/cross they are breeding. My favourite is misspelt breed names in adverts.
  • Where there is no after support, long term support or breeder/owner relationship there.
  • Where there is a basic lack of knowledge or competence around dog breeding, genetics etc from people breeding dogs indiscriminately.
  • Where pups are being sold for outrageous money. There is no logical reason to sell pups at some of the current prices - and some of the ‘good breeders’ seem to follow this trend at times to.
  • Where pups are bred to supply demand. They are a living, breathing, beautiful thing. They should be well planned for by breeders, months or years before the mating even happens. They should be born into a suitable environment, with every contingency plan going, with someone anxiously there with an emergency first aid whelping kit / just incase, and feed bottles/ just incase. They should be raised to be confident and happy things. And they should be sold to the right people, the best and most suitable. As we can all agree, they give us so much - and make our lives so much richer for being a part of it, so all of the above really should be a basic expectation as a starting point for such treasured creatures. I wouldn’t expect anything less than the above, regardless of the breed or type of dog I was seeking.
I was trying to work out how to say the above as eloquently as you have lol, I would add that I think the KC have alot to answer for in breeding pedigree dogs to a new "type / standard" that at no longer healthy. Pedigree / mongrel or crossbreed makes no odds to me.
 

AdorableAlice

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The thread was an interesting read.

For the last 18 months and currently (although some demand has ceased in certain parts of the country), a bitch of breeding age is not a dog, it is a fur covered walking bank account and until the public stop funding the bank the problem with just keep escalating.

I cannot comment on here about what I deal with on a daily basis but it is heart breaking, needless and abject cruelty. All fuelled by the the uneducated rose tinted public.
 

CorvusCorax

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I was trying to work out how to say the above as eloquently as you have lol, I would add that I think the KC have alot to answer for in breeding pedigree dogs to a new "type / standard" that at no longer healthy. Pedigree / mongrel or crossbreed makes no odds to me.
The KC doesn't breed dogs, it registers them. Some people who breed dogs are KC members, some aren't. It's as the name suggests, a club.
Every purebred dog has a breed standard against which it should be judged in the show ring. Mostly written/held by the FCI, with which the KC is (I think) a 'contract partner'.
There are a lot of dogs not being bred to breed standards that are of equally poor health/temperament as those which are.
I'm not a fan of the KC and they could be doing a lot more, but I think the Jemima Harrison documentary did a lot of damage in terms of public perception of what a well bred dog is and drove a lot of well-meaning people into the arms of puppy farmers.
 
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DabDab

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I think you see the same problems with crossbreeds these days as historically there has been with purebreds - the moment you describe something as a particular 'thing' then people seem to be able to suspend their ability to recognise a dog that is not functionally sound (in body and mind). Giving designer nicknames to certain crossbreeds was a very bad thing to happen to mongrels.
 

Karran

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London
Someone I work with got a puppy yesterday as she promised it to her son - a Cockerpoo. But a "pedigree one" She is already complaining about the smell......
Was speaking with my colleague today. First time I've seen her since hearing about her puppy. Not surprised to hear that the pup had already gone back to its breeder. I suppose its small mercies that the breeder had a clause about rehoming it and will hopefully be more careful in future.
 

conniegirl

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