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Dogs & Working Full Time

Levrier

Looking to re-home a terrier.... 🙄
Joined
9 July 2012
Messages
12,782
I am genuinely completely amazed by that!
Partly because why in that case are they described as sofa dogs and also every dog I have ever owned has been happy with two thirty minute walks a day. It certainly revises my opinion of greyhounds.
Maybe they would settle to it if that was all they had? Being greyhounds I suspect they would 😊 But it’s not what I’ve ever offered my dogs, and I surely notice when I don’t give them what they are used to.
 

CorvusCorax

Put me on UI if you don't enjoy sarcasm!
Joined
15 January 2008
Messages
43,209
Location
On a cliff
Dogs can be resilient creatures, they adapt.
I used to dread my older dog retiring and thought he'd get destructive or start self harming as he's naturally very 'high'. He's fine. Happy out whether he's hiking up a mountain or taking a pootle around the block.
I had a bit of a meltdown last year and didn't go further than the poo bin around the corner for weeks. They coped fine.
The younger one can be a bit mopey if he's with me for prolonged periods then back to normality again (he LOVES life on the road) but his head hasn't fallen off yet.
He was like that before I got him.
 

splashgirl45

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 March 2010
Messages
8,367
Location
suffolk
my friend got a greyhound a few years ago, she works from home but on the days she had to go to the office i used to go to her place at lunchtime and let him out for a wee and stayed for an hour so he had company. he loved me being there and would come a put his head on my lap so i could stroke him but it was a bit of a job trying to get him out to the garden and if it was raining it was worse even though i put his coat on. i would think 2 greyhounds who are already kennelled together would be a good idea or quite a few rescues have trouble homing dogs who need to be together,why not try the oldies website , just had a look there is a lovely 10 year old lurcher who wants a retirement home, kent greyhound rescue, he has a grey muzzle i would love him if i didnt already have 2 dogs, theres also 3 older springers whose owner has died,south yorkshire ess rescue..
 

Levrier

Looking to re-home a terrier.... 🙄
Joined
9 July 2012
Messages
12,782
I am genuinely completely amazed by that!
Partly because why in that case are they described as sofa dogs and also every dog I have ever owned has been happy with two thirty minute walks a day. It certainly revises my opinion of greyhounds.
it’s funny, I’ve been subconsciously mulling this over as I’ve let the dogs out etc tonight - maybe it is down to owner expectations? I would feel awful if I only gave mine 2 x 30 minute on lead exercise per day, so they’ve always expected more.... which I feel is their right 😊

But every owner is different, and as I’ve said - I’m sure they adapt 😊
 

AShetlandBitMeOnce

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 January 2015
Messages
1,516
I know that you can't have a set plan as you need to adapt to the needs of the dogs, but I don't think *the majority* of greyhounds would suit what I would like from a dog. The yard, whilst dog friendly, does have barn cats and rabbits and other small dogs roaming around so a straight off the track probably wouldn't suit. I would also struggle to get them into my hatchback, which at 40 miles a day for two trips to the yard I am reluctant to change for a bigger, more expensive to run car if I can help it. I also think mum would be intimidated by their size, and I would love to try and coax her to move more under the guise of a dog walk.

I did see the three spaniels which are super sweet, but I would like to get back to normality with work (and full pay) first so I don't end unexpectedly jobless with three new dogs - I am 99% sure I wont, but you never know with the current situation. I will definitely keep an eye out though, when the rescues are running fully I quite often see older dogs that come in pairs 'advertised' as their owner is unable to cope, or has become ill - so they are out there.
 

Apercrumbie

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Joined
3 November 2008
Messages
4,361
Location
South-West
Hmmm, there are ways to make it work such as some suggested here - eg. rehoming an older dog and arranging for someone to let them out at lunchtime. However there is no way I would ever be comfortable with leaving dogs alone from 8-6 for example, and that is the reality for many full-time workers.
 

Cinnamontoast

Fais pas chier!
Joined
6 July 2010
Messages
24,896
Maybe they would settle to it if that was all they had? Being greyhounds I suspect they would 😊 But it’s not what I’ve ever offered my dogs, and I surely notice when I don’t give them what they are used to.
I think they get used to what they have. Ours do 30 minutes and are shattered, because they’re made to think/search/retrieve/run. They get plenty of attention at home. However, as youngsters, they had a good hour free running in the woods (before Zak turned into a werewolf and they did a runner one day)

As an aside, I‘m a little bit sick of all the new dogs appearing; classic one today, white husky pissing off towards the main road, owner running after him screaming fruitlessly.
 

GSD Woman

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Joined
9 December 2018
Messages
324
I've had GSDs since 1990. (yes, I am old.) My first dog I worked but had 2 roommates that might be around when I wasn't to let him out. And my time outside of work was devoted to my dog. My second GSD I lived in an apartment and 2 out of 3 weeks had enough of a lunch break to come home and take her for a short walk. Since 1997 I've owned my own home with a large fenced back yard/garden for the dogs. That is part of the reason I purchased this house. Some of my jobs I've been able to bring my dogs and some not. They've all been fine, even the puppies. In the past 5 years I've had 2 breakdowns. The last one I was hospitalized for 5 days and a friend who petsits came by 3 times a day. The dogs were always happy to see her but they were fine. When I've been home, either because of said breakdowns or having been jobless, they have slept a bunch of the day but always been ready for a romp when I've desired one. When Freddie was young I arranged to have a long lunch hour to be able to let them outside for a potty break. I've come to the conclusion that as long as the youngsters can get outside for a break you should be fine as long as you spend most of your not work time with them.
As far as cats go, I've had indoor/outdoor and indoor only. I much prefer indoor only as he doesn't get fleas, chased by cars or hurt by dogs. It goes a long way towards keeping him healthy. He has plenty of toys, sleeps on the bed with me most nights and is spoiled rotten.
 

Moobli

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Joined
13 June 2013
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3,121
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Scotland 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿
I would choose the breed with care - whilst I’m sure it works for people, I can’t imagine a breed like a springer or a collie being that happy with being left all day? Greyhounds and lurchers (and now a terrier!) have been great as they are so laid back
I made the mistake of getting my first border collie pup when I worked full time and lived alone, despite my mum (a farmer's daughter) strongly warning me against it. He did have the company of my older GSD bitch but he needed so much more than I could provide in the time I had outside work (which still included up at the crack of dawn so had a couple of hours to spend playing/training and later walking, home at lunchtime for 40mins or so and every evening, weekend and holiday being dedicated to the dogs) :(

I made myself ill worrying about him and what to do for the best. He trashed the (rented) cottage while I was out at work and I got to the point where I really hated leaving him at all and then dreaded going home to whatever mess I'd find that day. Thankfully the farmer/sheepdog trainer I bought him from suggested I take him a few times a week for training on sheep, which I did and it definitely helped fulfil his innate needs but I did take the farmer's offer to buy him back seriously (for the welfare of Moss despite the fact it would have broken my heart). Cue new boyfriend (now hubby) entering our lives, who is a shepherd and he took Moss back to Scotland with him once we knew it was serious between us and that I would move in with him in the not too distant future. What a change in Moss! He was living the life he was clearly meant to live and I never had any further trouble from him trashing things, barking incessantly etc etc.

Some collies might be ok with FT working owners but I am really not sure it is worth the risk personally. I have since volunteered in BC Rescue and the amount of working bred dogs that just can't settle to a more sedate, urban life where they are left for hours each day is in the hundreds every year :(
 

Clodagh

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Joined
17 August 2005
Messages
15,996
Location
Essex
I made the mistake of getting my first border collie pup when I worked full time and lived alone, despite my mum (a farmer's daughter) strongly warning me against it. He did have the company of my older GSD bitch but he needed so much more than I could provide in the time I had outside work (which still included up at the crack of dawn so had a couple of hours to spend playing/training and later walking, home at lunchtime for 40mins or so and every evening, weekend and holiday being dedicated to the dogs) :(

I made myself ill worrying about him and what to do for the best. He trashed the (rented) cottage while I was out at work and I got to the point where I really hated leaving him at all and then dreaded going home to whatever mess I'd find that day. Thankfully the farmer/sheepdog trainer I bought him from suggested I take him a few times a week for training on sheep, which I did and it definitely helped fulfil his innate needs but I did take the farmer's offer to buy him back seriously (for the welfare of Moss despite the fact it would have broken my heart). Cue new boyfriend (now hubby) entering our lives, who is a shepherd and he took Moss back to Scotland with him once we knew it was serious between us and that I would move in with him in the not too distant future. What a change in Moss! He was living the life he was clearly meant to live and I never had any further trouble from him trashing things, barking incessantly etc etc.

Some collies might be ok with FT working owners but I am really not sure it is worth the risk personally. I have since volunteered in BC Rescue and the amount of working bred dogs that just can't settle to a more sedate, urban life where they are left for hours each day is in the hundreds every year :(
My mum has rehomed several working collies and although they don't get the exercise they are bred for I think the fact they are with her all day off set that. When she was youn ger she would be tramping the fells with them but the last one she only got normal length walks and was quite content, this was in spite of being rehomed as she wasn't coping in a busy house in town with small children.
 

Clodagh

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Joined
17 August 2005
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15,996
Location
Essex
it’s funny, I’ve been subconsciously mulling this over as I’ve let the dogs out etc tonight - maybe it is down to owner expectations? I would feel awful if I only gave mine 2 x 30 minute on lead exercise per day, so they’ve always expected more.... which I feel is their right 😊

But every owner is different, and as I’ve said - I’m sure they adapt 😊
I think they do get used to whats on offer, and of course as yours can't be let off lead they lose a lot of down/sniff/think time. (I'm not dissing you for that BTW!).
 

PapaverFollis

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Joined
13 November 2012
Messages
3,925
I think a lot of collies struggle in pet homes regardless of FT working or not.

My dogs have always been fine to be left. Sprollie has benefitted more from me not working at all now, but he did cope reasonably when I did work... honestly don't think the spaniel gives two hoots as long as he gets a run and his food he's just paws up all day. He's probably the laziest spaniel ever though! Has always had this incredible off-switch. He used to fall asleep in puppy training class between goes. 😂
 

blackcob

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Joined
20 March 2007
Messages
11,168
Location
Shropshire
Reading through this I think my stance on not leaving dogs all day probably stems from the experience of my first dog - an adolescent Siberian husky with severe, destructive separation anxiety. If I'd made a better choice I'd probably be a lot more relaxed about it now. 😅
 

honetpot

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Joined
27 July 2010
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5,572
Location
Cambridgeshire
Hmmm, there are ways to make it work such as some suggested here - eg. rehoming an older dog and arranging for someone to let them out at lunchtime. However there is no way I would ever be comfortable with leaving dogs alone from 8-6 for example, and that is the reality for many full-time workers.
I know it doesn't seem right leaving them but they are left overnight anyway. My mum used to crack me up, she had a doberman that was smarter than her. It would sleep in the garage overnight, it had a bed and she would literally tuck it in complete with cover. They went to bed at ten and were up at eight, but they would leave her for more than four hours in the day time.
If they are pack animals they would hunt then sleep, its only us that want us to be reactive all the time.
 

CorvusCorax

Put me on UI if you don't enjoy sarcasm!
Joined
15 January 2008
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43,209
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On a cliff
My trainer was called out by a family with a BC. It had eaten their kitchen and wouldn't let anyone sit on any of the chairs in the living room. Didn't get walked as it pulled on the lead. He walked back out again and didn't take any money (he never made it as a commercial trainer).
 

JennBags

Chief Photograph-Poster
Joined
21 May 2002
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16,321
Location
West Sussex
Agree that it does very much depend on the breed and individual dog. There is no way I'd be able to leave my collie all day, we do leave her for a few hours if we need to, but make sure she's had a good walk beforehand. Wouldn't be able to do it every day, but she's ok on occasion.
I personally wouldn't have a dog if I had to go to work full time and leave it at home alone though.
 

brightmount

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Joined
25 January 2006
Messages
3,002
I am a home checker, not for one specific rescue, but a whole spectrum, as it works based on geography so I get sent out in my locality. It is not my job to “pass” a home, just to relay the information to the rescue.

The home check is always based on a form, and most if not all ask how long the dog will be left for. 4 hours is universally the cut off point. I don’t know any rescue that will place a dog where the owner is out all day. I’m not saying there aren’t any, but none of the ones I have worked with will consider it.

I was working full time when I had my first dog, but went back at lunch time to walk her. Even though she wasn’t left for more than 4 hours I still don’t feel I did the right thing by her and wouldn’t do it again.

Those are my experiences but I will concede some dogs can cope with it.
 

EllenJay

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Joined
1 June 2011
Messages
1,867
I've noticed a lot of people are recommending getting an older dog. Word of warning here - a lot of older dogs, had older owners who were home all day (retired/ill), and often end up in rescues as the owner is no longer able to look after them. In these cases the dogs are used to having someone around all the time, so will probably find it harder to settle with a full time worker rather than a puppy/younger dog.
 

Apercrumbie

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3 November 2008
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4,361
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South-West
I know it doesn't seem right leaving them but they are left overnight anyway. My mum used to crack me up, she had a doberman that was smarter than her. It would sleep in the garage overnight, it had a bed and she would literally tuck it in complete with cover. They went to bed at ten and were up at eight, but they would leave her for more than four hours in the day time.
If they are pack animals they would hunt then sleep, its only us that want us to be reactive all the time.
But they are left all night and all day in the circumstances many people here are describing, with a bit of time at beginning and end of day with their owners. I think it's doing both that is tricky for many people/dogs.

Look, as I said before, it can be done. However there are so many dogs that just won't cope with this kind of setup, no matter how well trained/brought up. So it's a bit of a gamble finding a dog that will thrive being left alone for the vast majority of the time. I know that many of those who have posted on here are fabulous dog owners so I will not reproach them, but how often do we hear about the flip side of this coin - when we hear neighbour's dogs howling due to being left alone all day, or friends talking about how destructive their dog is?

It's clear from the examples given here that your non-work life has to completely revolve around the dog - long walks at each end of the day and mental exercises to wear them out. If you are prepared for that to be the case, and for the possibility that your gamble may not pay off and you end up with a dog that just can't cope being left like that, then it's worth a try.
 

PapaverFollis

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13 November 2012
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3,925
When I was working full time/at all the dogs slept on the bed. Pack pile on. 😂 I honestly think it helped as although we were all asleep it's still together time for the dog!

To be honest they still sleep on the bed now. 😂
 

conniegirl

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Joined
3 November 2004
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5,640
But they are left all night and all day in the circumstances many people here are describing, with a bit of time at beginning and end of day with their owners.
That is a large reason why I will not crate a dog, nor will I put them in a separate room for the night, we are out all day, so the dogs have all evening and all night with us, including our BT who sleeps on our bed with us most nights (beagle prefers his bed at the end of our bed), cuddles on the sofa all evening.
 

CorvusCorax

Put me on UI if you don't enjoy sarcasm!
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Mine are out in secure kennel runs during the day so they get fresh air and can see what's happening, and in at night and crated to sleep.
I do agree being in the same house all day and all night apart from walks would probably be a bit boring but still better than a rescue kennel and depending on a time poor volunteer to let you out occasionally, with rows of barking dogs on either side of you.
Naturally a canid would be out roaming during the day, with the pack in the evening and in a small den to sleep.
So I'm more than happy with my setup.
As I've said before, a crate is no different to a stable for a horse.
 

GSD Woman

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9 December 2018
Messages
324
My 2 are loose in the house when I'm working. The young one was crated until I felt safe leaving her loose. Sometimes they sleep in crates and sometimes are loose in the house. My cat prefers them to sleep in the crates. He doesn't like them jumping on the bed and landing on him.
 

Cinnamontoast

Fais pas chier!
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6 July 2010
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Ours have their nice bed overnight, but as I generally wake up at about 4am and swap rooms, they always come for cuddles til I get up. During the day, they have the run of the house, but we took away the dog flap when they were going through their Houdini phase. The door is usually open if the weather is decent.
 

leflynn

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13 September 2010
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Oop Norf
Sorry, I know I’m being picky, but no greyhound I’ve had would be content with two half hours - you do have to make sure you choose your hound with care! There absolutely is always one to fit your needs, and there ARE lots of them who would suit this much exercise.... but none of the ones I’ve had would have done, so it’s worth bearing in mind they aren’t all the same 😊
I disagree - 90% of ex racing greyhounds are happy with two x half hour walks. I know plenty that would protest with more walks and I also know some that are happy to go further but essentially 2 shortish walks a day are fine. They are sprinters and the advice i always give when doing home checks is if you want to do longer distances build them up to it. There is a greyhound for everyone but generally they aren't bothered about long walks - usually we debunk the myth that they need lots of exercise as they raced. Mine have always been happy with short or long walks but its all down to how you settle them in and the temperament of the dog
 

Leo Walker

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19 July 2013
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Northampton
I disagree - 90% of ex racing greyhounds are happy with two x half hour walks. I know plenty that would protest with more walks and I also know some that are happy to go further but essentially 2 shortish walks a day are fine. They are sprinters and the advice i always give when doing home checks is if you want to do longer distances build them up to it. There is a greyhound for everyone but generally they aren't bothered about long walks - usually we debunk the myth that they need lots of exercise as they raced. Mine have always been happy with short or long walks but its all down to how you settle them in and the temperament of the dog
Same with whippets. When I was fell walking I built them up and we were out for 5 hours some days, now I'm broken and crippled they are happy with half an hour some days, other days they go further and are out for 1.5hours. On wet days they wont go at all and go for a car ride and do scent games instead.

They only go out once and that's enough for them. The young lurcher needs a bit more so she goes for extra walks, or car rides and chases balls in the garden etc if shes being a bit bouncy. We are with them pretty much 24/7 though. Im not sure it makes any difference. The lazy creatures sleep 20 hours a day!
 
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