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Horse acting different to when I viewed her...

Joined
19 May 2020
Messages
42
I’d get the vet out to check over for ulcers, back / joint / SI problem, and also teeth. I’d check when she last had her teeth done as this caught me off guard a few years ago with a horse that wouldn’t pick up back feet and was in pain being ridden. Also I have to agree with the others and a 6 yo TB isn’t a great first horse unless you’re really experienced. They’re sensitive at the best of times and a new owner, new yard and different hay or food wouldn’t help. The fact that the old owner doesn’t want to help makes me question if they had doped the horse before being ridden, however Ownedby4horses has a point and I see blame on both sides. Moving forward I’d start with the vet visit and see where you are with that.
Thanks so much
 

Errin Paddywack

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 June 2019
Messages
920
A friend of mine bought a two year old off me. Broke him and did well with him. Sold him several years later when she was getting married. Had a couple of people try him and get dumped by him. He was quite sensitive and didn't like people bossing him about if he didn't know them. He was finally bought by an experienced couple for showjumping. They later reported that for the first week no-one could stay on him. Once he settled he went out and won the first jumping competition they put him in. He was a total sweetie, never put a foot wrong for my friend or me either on the odd time I rode him.
 
Joined
19 May 2020
Messages
42
A friend of mine bought a two year old off me. Broke him and did well with him. Sold him several years later when she was getting married. Had a couple of people try him and get dumped by him. He was quite sensitive and didn't like people bossing him about if he didn't know them. He was finally bought by an experienced couple for showjumping. They later reported that for the first week no-one could stay on him. Once he settled he went out and won the first jumping competition they put him in. He was a total sweetie, never put a foot wrong for my friend or me either on the odd time I rode him.
Thank you for this!
 

FestiveFuzz

Well-Known Member
Joined
5 January 2008
Messages
3,969
Location
Surrey
i wonder if she was sedated/pain injections for the videos and buyer inspections? Would explain why seller isnt interested (i sure as hell would be if my horse turned satanic in a new home)...and certainly explains why she had you sign a contract ‘sold as is’....who does that? A receipt sure...but a contract For a private sale? Dealer maybe a contract but private sale?

ive learnt anyone who actually specifies ‘sold as seen’ on an advert or receipt, knows there’s something wrong with the ‘goods’ that theyre not alerting the buyer to. It gives them legal protection.
I disagree only a dodgy seller would state ‘sold as seen’. I’ve only sold one horse in 20+ years of ownership, he was advertised warts and all (was sweet enough but could be nappy at times) but the buyer refused to vet him against my advice and I sure as hell wasn’t having any comeback later on down the line if they changed their mind as he was being replaced and I wouldn’t have had the space or funds to take him back.

As it is, they kept him for many years so all was good, but as a genuine private seller I couldn’t run the risk of a claim at a later date.
 

PurBee

Well-Known Member
Joined
23 November 2019
Messages
907
Location
Ireland
I disagree only a dodgy seller would state ‘sold as seen’. I’ve only sold one horse in 20+ years of ownership, he was advertised warts and all (was sweet enough but could be nappy at times) but the buyer refused to vet him against my advice and I sure as hell wasn’t having any comeback later on down the line if they changed their mind as he was being replaced and I wouldn’t have had the space or funds to take him back.

As it is, they kept him for many years so all was good, but as a genuine private seller I couldn’t run the risk of a claim at a later date.
yes, i can understand this perspective. That makes sense...thanks for highlighting the ‘other side’ of the coin.

I find with an animal though, being a sentient being, especially a horse being an ever-changing creature, the ‘sold as seen’ caveat to be a mute point.
Animals can easily react so differently for so many reasons - change in environment, food, handling etc...the buyer wont really know what theyve bought until they take them on and work with them.

I guess buyers who want more security than ‘sold as seen’ should find a seller who’s prepared to take the horse back if the home doesnt suit. As even a 5* vet check approval doesnt guarantee the animals behaviour to change of handler/rider and environment wont alter.

When i bought by mare, which i will admit was the way not to buy a horse!...anyway...i bought her, owner had her since foal, her only handler her whole life....same home and herd for her whole life, said she’s sweet as anything, doesnt kick or bite etc. Well....within the first day she kicked me, and the first month bit me hard! She had herd separation anxiety and really altered her behaviour....she lunged at me teeth bared etc...the whole 9 yards! But with patience i/we got there. She took ages to adjust but it was amazing to experience her slowly trusting this whole ‘new world’ she was suddenly plonked in. I didnt rush it As i could understand her perspective. Now she’s wonderful.

Suggestions that OP’s horse was maybe experiencing change in home anxiety are valid, but with the horse being sweet on the ground handling and just terrible when backed seems like more is going on than just home change anxiety.
 

Trouper

Well-Known Member
Joined
11 May 2015
Messages
545
Whatever has or has not happened it sounds from your description as if the horse is in some pain - somewhere from something. If you did not have her vetted then you can't go back and check bloods for pain relief meds when you tried her so it seems you have to decide just how much you like/want to keep her and how much you are prepared to invest in finding out the problems. If I were going to go down the investigations route I would be contacting Tom Beech (The Osteopathic Vet) - have a look at his FB page. You may have to wait for an appointment because he is so good but he will look at the whole horse for you - and being an equine vet can do/arrange for all the same tests any other vet can.
It is a horrible situation to be in and I do feel for you but if you don't get to the bottom of the problem, please do not pass her on to anyone else. She could seriously injure them or end up having the most awful life herself. I will sound as if I am jumping the gun here but I have been in your position and the only peace of mind I had after all the investigations was to put the horse to sleep (at age 7). I have never regretted it.
 

FestiveFuzz

Well-Known Member
Joined
5 January 2008
Messages
3,969
Location
Surrey
yes, i can understand this perspective. That makes sense...thanks for highlighting the ‘other side’ of the coin.

I find with an animal though, being a sentient being, especially a horse being an ever-changing creature, the ‘sold as seen’ caveat to be a mute point.
Animals can easily react so differently for so many reasons - change in environment, food, handling etc...the buyer wont really know what theyve bought until they take them on and work with them.

I guess buyers who want more security than ‘sold as seen’ should find a seller who’s prepared to take the horse back if the home doesnt suit. As even a 5* vet check approval doesnt guarantee the animals behaviour to change of handler/rider and environment wont alter.

When i bought by mare, which i will admit was the way not to buy a horse!...anyway...i bought her, owner had her since foal, her only handler her whole life....same home and herd for her whole life, said she’s sweet as anything, doesnt kick or bite etc. Well....within the first day she kicked me, and the first month bit me hard! She had herd separation anxiety and really altered her behaviour....she lunged at me teeth bared etc...the whole 9 yards! But with patience i/we got there. She took ages to adjust but it was amazing to experience her slowly trusting this whole ‘new world’ she was suddenly plonked in. I didnt rush it As i could understand her perspective. Now she’s wonderful.

Suggestions that OP’s horse was maybe experiencing change in home anxiety are valid, but with the horse being sweet on the ground handling and just terrible when backed seems like more is going on than just home change anxiety.
I think your approach with your mare was the right one, unfortunately you only have to look on fb or on here to see that not everyone appreciates that some horses require a bit of settling in time when moving homes.

Your point about sentient beasts is spot on, but equally it’s all rather subjective. What I deem to be sharp could be someone else’s plod for example, and herein lies the problem when it comes to advertising horses, and that’s before you factor in any unsettled quirks that appear in the upheaval of moving home.
 

poiuytrewq

Well-Known Member
Joined
3 April 2008
Messages
9,441
Location
Cotswolds
If as above the seller is genuinely private is there any research to be done into the horse?
If it’s trained the trainer could be contacted and may be able to give an inkling as to the horses true temperament and how long the seller had actually owned it etc
Op, I really hope you get somewhere with this. You’ve taken on board all the advice and replied to every question (sometimes several times over) which often people don’t bother to do so you obviously really appreciate the help your being given which is quite refreshing!
 

Gloi

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Joined
8 May 2012
Messages
4,824
If you still have the copy of the advert you bought her from , make sure you keep hold of it. How does it describe the horse?
 

Eclipse 2020

Active Member
Joined
23 May 2020
Messages
35
I agree with getting the horse checked out with a vet just in case there is a Heath problem cause by this. A horse may act differently with a more experienced rider Tb aren’t for first time owners But we all make mistakes . To be honest I don’t think you’re going to get far with the seller even if the horse is crazy you have no evidence that the horse was drugged when you tried the horse and because the seller was private you have very little rights. I really hope you get it sorted and I wish you the best of luck.
 

Daniel_Jack

Well-Known Member
Joined
18 August 2017
Messages
163
You poor thing! I can only imagine how difficult this is for you.

While I agree that horses do need time to settle after a move this horses behaviour suggests more of a pain issue than just being unsettled.

It sounds like you have a plan of action but even if the vet confirms an issue I'm not sure if you'd be able to take this up with the seller or if you'd need to work to resolve the issue yourself. Fingers crossed you get to the bottom of things quickly.
 
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