Panorama tonight - racing industry and slaughterhouses

ycbm

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Would this be it? All guesswork.

Cost to shoot and cremate £200 per horse. 10 horses £2000.

Cost to transport 10 to an abattoir in one lorry, (paperwork filled out either to be NI origin riding horses for sale valued at £5000 a piece, or temporary crossing for competition), £300.

Price at abattoir £300 per horse, £3000.

Net saving £5000.
 

palo1

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Unfortunately, I thought this "Put simply, society won’t tolerate such irresponsibility, and cowardly or cynical opacity won’t make the problem go away." in the closing paragraphs was naive.

Society is more than happy to tolerate that, and has done for a very long time.

People get upset when the see a horse breaking a leg in the Grand National, but it's easy to ignore 10 youngsters being sent to slaughter because it doesn't (usually) happen on national TV.
Quite so. It is made very, very easy for all of us to turn away from any unpleasantness related to animal welfare only to demonstrate outrage when those things happening are somehow forced upon us. If only the vast majority of people who eat meat in ready meals, take-aways, pubs etc would own the process of the meats they are eating, it might mean that people were generally more responsible and more switched on to what happens to animals. Shrink wrapped chicken breasts and ready meals seem to have an awful cost in terms of conscious responsibility in my view and this whole sorry business of horses at abbatoirs is similar. I wonder where people thought unwanted race-horses (and other horses) end up? I wonder what people think an abbatoir is really like? Most don't I don't think though. Abbatoirs are necessary if we are to slaughter animals for food and many of them are good. I have read some utter drivel on faceache about the slaughter-man holding a carrot for the horse to be dispatched (as you may in fact do at home) ; those people are clearly oblivious to some of the realities of equine death at an abbatoir yet they are the ones shouting loudly...it grieves me, it really does :(
 

Wishfilly

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Quite so. It is made very, very easy for all of us to turn away from any unpleasantness related to animal welfare only to demonstrate outrage when those things happening are somehow forced upon us. If only the vast majority of people who eat meat in ready meals, take-aways, pubs etc would own the process of the meats they are eating, it might mean that people were generally more responsible and more switched on to what happens to animals. Shrink wrapped chicken breasts and ready meals seem to have an awful cost in terms of conscious responsibility in my view and this whole sorry business of horses at abbatoirs is similar. I wonder where people thought unwanted race-horses (and other horses) end up? I wonder what people think an abbatoir is really like? Most don't I don't think though. Abbatoirs are necessary if we are to slaughter animals for food and many of them are good. I have read some utter drivel on faceache about the slaughter-man holding a carrot for the horse to be dispatched (as you may in fact do at home) ; those people are clearly oblivious to some of the realities of equine death at an abbatoir yet they are the ones shouting loudly...it grieves me, it really does :(
I think if we are talking about the general public, even among those who follow racing, they probably have no idea of the scale of the problem- I think as you say a lot of them don't think.

I remember when Kauto Star was possibly going to enter second career, there was a lot of outrage from some racing fans about him being "forced" to do dressage, as though it was somehow demeaning to the horse. I think they felt he should have earned a happy retirement in a field somewhere, and that this was some kind of very unusual situation. I don't think there was the understanding that a) retirement of that kind doesn't suit every horse and b) that most racehorses will need a second career and what Kauto Star's retraining could have done for the profile of ex-racers.

I definitely don't think that people who have a passing interest in racing have any idea about the number of ex-racers, or those who never quite make it, and the scale of the problem. I actually think a lot of them would be keen to help, and if there was some kind of "home of rest" for ex-racers, some might be keen to visit and donate, for example.

I genuinely think for the average member of the racing public, the idea that any thoroughbred (perhaps even that any horses) end up at slaughter will be a huge shock.

And I genuinely doubt those without much knowledge of or interest in racing at all ever think about it.

As you say, a lot of people in this country eat very low welfare meat, and don't really like to think about how the animal may have lived or died.
 

splashgirl45

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i think the issue is not just with horses being killed. the general public need to know where their meat is coming from, how it has been bought up and what sort of end it has. we are all passionate about horses and we feel upset as horses are sensitive beings but so are all other creatures that are killed for us to eat, even the humble chicken is a little character and those who keep them know... although this country is supposed to have higher welfare customs than others, we are still not good enough IMO,. every animal deserves a humane end and if prices go up, then people need to support the good practises and buy the more expensive meat /poultry and eat it less often. i think we need more media coverage of the treatment of all animals... the racehorse industry needs to put much more money into welfare after the track...as there are so many racehorses being sent for slaughter the racehorse industry should shell out for facilities to end their lives in a better way..
 

palo1

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I think if we are talking about the general public, even among those who follow racing, they probably have no idea of the scale of the problem- I think as you say a lot of them don't think.

I remember when Kauto Star was possibly going to enter second career, there was a lot of outrage from some racing fans about him being "forced" to do dressage, as though it was somehow demeaning to the horse. I think they felt he should have earned a happy retirement in a field somewhere, and that this was some kind of very unusual situation. I don't think there was the understanding that a) retirement of that kind doesn't suit every horse and b) that most racehorses will need a second career and what Kauto Star's retraining could have done for the profile of ex-racers.

I definitely don't think that people who have a passing interest in racing have any idea about the number of ex-racers, or those who never quite make it, and the scale of the problem. I actually think a lot of them would be keen to help, and if there was some kind of "home of rest" for ex-racers, some might be keen to visit and donate, for example.

I genuinely think for the average member of the racing public, the idea that any thoroughbred (perhaps even that any horses) end up at slaughter will be a huge shock.

And I genuinely doubt those without much knowledge of or interest in racing at all ever think about it.

As you say, a lot of people in this country eat very low welfare meat, and don't really like to think about how the animal may have lived or died.
Yes, I am not trying to knock anyone for eating meat btw just for the lack of joined up thinking about our relationship with animals really. If we engage with animals there are always costs to that and I do feel quite strongly that we have a culture that divorces us from that and increasingly so. It just seems really important to me for us all to face up to what we contribute to and either accept that cost or change our ways. The popularity of coloured cobs/traditionals is another area where there is appalling wastage and neglect too as low end breeders churn out the poor things and when they are not sold, where do people think they go? There is a particularly unpleasant hypocrisy or paradox in the racing scenario though - where there is the most money, status and glamour there is also this awful wastage and lack of care for those animals.
 

honetpot

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Would this be it? All guesswork.

Cost to shoot and cremate £200 per horse. 10 horses £2000.

Cost to transport 10 to an abattoir in one lorry, (paperwork filled out either to be NI origin riding horses for sale valued at £5000 a piece, or temporary crossing for competition), £300.

Price at abattoir £300 per horse, £3000.

Net saving £5000.
This only works if they are going in the fit for human consumption, food chain. It costs far less to have a horse shot for rendering, as there is some profit in the rendering. I know in Newmarket the JC used to subside horse disposal, for trainers.
https://jockeyclubestates.co.uk/newmarket/equine-disposal-scheme
You would only get £300, if it has a clean passport, well it should have.
Perhaps will make it less viable,
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/importi...mal-origin#live-animals-and-germinal-products
 

palo1

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i think the issue is not just with horses being killed. the general public need to know where their meat is coming from, how it has been bought up and what sort of end it has. we are all passionate about horses and we feel upset as horses are sensitive beings but so are all other creatures that are killed for us to eat, even the humble chicken is a little character and those who keep them know... although this country is supposed to have higher welfare customs than others, we are still not good enough IMO,. every animal deserves a humane end and if prices go up, then people need to support the good practises and buy the more expensive meat /poultry and eat it less often. i think we need more media coverage of the treatment of all animals... the racehorse industry needs to put much more money into welfare after the track...as there are so many racehorses being sent for slaughter the racehorse industry should shell out for facilities to end their lives in a better way..
Yes. It always makes me really cross that some of those people who are so outraged about aspects of animal welfare are quite happy to go to the pub for steak and ale pie, pork chops, bacon sandwiches etc etc and it sort of suggests that they have no clue about what they are talking about...
 

Wishfilly

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Yes, I am not trying to knock anyone for eating meat btw just for the lack of joined up thinking about our relationship with animals really. If we engage with animals there are always costs to that and I do feel quite strongly that we have a culture that divorces us from that and increasingly so. It just seems really important to me for us all to face up to what we contribute to and either accept that cost or change our ways. The popularity of coloured cobs/traditionals is another area where there is appalling wastage and neglect too as low end breeders churn out the poor things and when they are not sold, where do people think they go? There is a particularly unpleasant hypocrisy or paradox in the racing scenario though - where there is the most money, status and glamour there is also this awful wastage and lack of care for those animals.
Completely agree with all of this.
 

Tiddlypom

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Joint statement issued from Bransby and other equine welfare organisations.

Joint statement from British Horse Society, Blue Cross, Bransby Horses, Horse World, Redwings, RSPCA and World Horse Welfare

As welfare charities we were disturbed and deeply concerned by Monday’s (19/07/2021) BBC Panorama programme. It highlighted a number of issues that are not solely connected to racing, many of which the welfare charities have long been trying to bring to public and Government attention.

It showed horses being transported for slaughter over many miles, across country borders and in some cases while suffering with injuries such as severe lameness, in direct contravention of horse transport regulations. It also showed falsification of passports and failures in the equine ID and traceability system and the concerning treatment of horses in a slaughterhouse.

The racing world can help to drive improvements and we understand the British Horseracing Authority and other representatives of the industry including the Horse Welfare Board will be meeting to discuss the programme in more detail. However, we believe there are wider questions that need to be answered: why did it take undercover footage to reveal these issues when CCTV is now standard in abattoirs? How we can have confidence that abattoirs are consistently following legislation already in place which is intended to protect animal welfare? How can our equine ID system be shored up to prevent fraud and profiteering from these vulnerable animals at the end of their lives?

We would encourage all equine owners to make plans and provision for their own animal’s end of life care and we are calling on the Government through Defra’s Action Plan for Animal Welfare to act on promises to improve our Equine ID system – making sure the system is fit for purpose, enforceable and enforced – and ensure welfare is paramount both in horse transport and during their end-of-life care.

Please see our recent Britain’s Horse Problem Report for more detail on many of the issues raised by the programme.

To find out more about Bransby Horses’ advice and guidance on euthanasia, please visit our Equine Advice page

 

eahotson

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If this is the case, the problem is with the slaughter houses and not the racing industry.
Do you not think that the hugely wealthy racing industry can't if necessary fund and make frequent checks on slaughter houses.Its the least they can do for the animals that they bred and used.This is the underbelly of horse sport.
 

ycbm

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Do you not think that the hugely wealthy racing industry can't if necessary fund and make frequent checks on slaughter houses.Its the least they can do for the animals that they bred and used.This is the underbelly of horse sport.
Agreed, driver could stay to watch them properly shot, but we are also back round to why can that industry not put them down at home?
.
 

tristar

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Agreed, driver could stay to watch them properly shot, but we are also back round to why can that industry not put them down at home?
.
they would not have the stomach for that

taking a heathly 3 to 5 y r old round the corner to pop it off
 
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