please show me pictures of your horse's head

cptrayes

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Please can you post or point me to pictures of horses' heads without a head collar or bridle on?

My horse with the head traumas has developed swollen veins on his cheeks. I know these are not normal for him, but I need to know if they are normal at all, because I've never seen them, that I remember, on any other resting horse. If you could tell me what breed the horse is too, that will help.

Thank you.
 

Fides

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I'm of the mind that a vet's opinion would be better given the history of your horse.
 

cptrayes

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I'm of the mind that a vet's opinion would be better given the history of your horse.

I already have it. How stupid do you think I am? My vet's opinion is to put the horse down of the non licensed pain killers we are about to give him do not work, or if the pain returns when they stop. He cannot be kept on them for life because the effect wears off and the dose has to be increased. But thanks for your support anyway.
 
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Elsiecat

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485476_185222541630053_1362025474_n.jpg


Thoroughbred. On this picture she was 14 (but a week off being 15).
 

Fides

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I already have it. How stupid do you think I am? My vets opinion is to put the horse down of the nnn licensed pain killers we are about to give him do not work. But thanks for your support anyway.

That's a bit uncalled for.

I'd follow the vet's advice :(
 
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Clava

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Thank you. The viens you can see on yours are probably twice the size on Ace, but my memory of that they weren't there at all before a week ago.

Recently I bought Belle (the TB) in and also thought her veins looked bigger than normal, that day she had a mild episode of headshaking (which is something we have largely overcome, but I had taken her off the salt which does the trick while she was on antibiotics).
 

cptrayes

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Recently I bought Belle (the TB) in and also thought her veins looked bigger than normal, that day she had a mild episode of headshaking (which is something we have largely overcome, but I had taken her off the salt which does the trick while she was on antibiotics).


How interesting. I'm not sure if you are aware, but two head fractures have left him with trigeminal nerve problems, which are often what cause head shaking, and he is a headshaker in everything except that he does not shake his head much. And I recently gave him a lump of rock salt that he is attacking with a vengeance.
 
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paddi22

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Uncalled for?

When your post suggested I was failing to obtain veterinary support for a horse which needs it?

I think not.

in fairness, you never mentioned you had called vet already. theres tons of posts here where people ask advice and haven't thought of calling vet, so its not out of the ordinary.
 

Clava

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How interesting. I'm not sure if you are aware, but two head fractures have left him with trigeminal nerve problems, which are often what cause head shaking, and he is a headshaker in everything except that he does not shake his head much. And I recently gave him a lump of rock salt that he is attacking with a vengeance.

Interesting. Yes, I feed salt to reduce potassium spikes which are linked to issues with the trigeminal nerve misfiring. She doesn't touch a salt lick and can't get enough, after removing all clover and feeding salt I got her down to just two days shaking last year (usually a couple of months) and this year we had that short bout (of an hour or so) and nothing since putting her back on the salt.
 

YasandCrystal

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OP have you taken a look at the Turmeric user group on facebook at all? I recommended turmeric for your new horse with the sarcoids. Turmeric is a powerful natural antiseptic, analgesic, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, it speeds up wound healing and is antiarthritic to name but a few of it's benefits. I have been using it on all of my horses - one has aggressive ringbone, another has chronic SI dysfunction and another has age related changes and windgalls. The windgalls have gone and the mobility in the old mare is amazing. The other 2 are moving so much better also. I take it myself for shoulder pain. There are some amazing stories of the results people have had using turmeric as a supplement and it forms the basis of many of the veterinary produced and herbalist produced remedy supplements.
 

cptrayes

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in fairness, you never mentioned you had called vet already. theres tons of posts here where people ask advice and haven't thought of calling vet, so its not out of the ordinary.

In fairness, she could have asked.

For goodness sake guys, can you not make allowances for how damned stressful this situation is for me, to have to watch a horse in pain day after day so that I can prove to myself and others that he is too ill to be allowed to live?????

I didn't ask for advice. I asked for photos. If you can't give me those then please, please leave me alone!
 
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PolarSkye

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in fairness, you never mentioned you had called vet already. theres tons of posts here where people ask advice and haven't thought of calling vet, so its not out of the ordinary.

To be fair, CPT is a seasoned poster and has proven that she knows what she is doing wrt her horses, and Fides has been a tad "random" of late with some of her responses. I can absolutely see how CPT is feeling more than a little raw and sensitive and could have taken what Fides said the wrong way.

P
 

PolarSkye

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In fairness, she could have asked.

For goodness sake guys, can you not make allowances for how damned stressedul this situation is for me, to have to watch a horse in pain day after day so that I can prove to myself and others that he is too ill to be allowed to live?????

I didn't ask for advice. I asked for photos. If you can't give me those then please, please leave me alone!

And breathe. This must be so stressful for you. Will dig up some pics for you.

P
 

Clava

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OP have you taken a look at the Turmeric user group on facebook at all? I recommended turmeric for your new horse with the sarcoids. Turmeric is a powerful natural antiseptic, analgesic, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, it speeds up wound healing and is antiarthritic to name but a few of it's benefits. I have been using it on all of my horses - one has aggressive ringbone, another has chronic SI dysfunction and another has age related changes and windgalls. The windgalls have gone and the mobility in the old mare is amazing. The other 2 are moving so much better also. I take it myself for shoulder pain. There are some amazing stories of the results people have had using turmeric as a supplement and it forms the basis of many of the veterinary produced and herbalist produced remedy supplements.

I was also feeding turmeric in the vague hope it would help, but I am almost certain it caused an ulcer and peritonitis (and was extremely ill) which is what I was giving her antibiotics for. I nolonger supplement her turmeric.
 

YasandCrystal

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Interesting. Yes, I feed salt to reduce potassium spikes which are linked to issues with the trigeminal nerve misfiring. She doesn't touch a salt lick and can't get enough, after removing all clover and feeding salt I got her down to just two days shaking last year (usually a couple of months) and this year we had that short bout (of an hour or so) and nothing since putting her back on the salt.

The interesting thing is that you cannot feed enough salt via a lick - it will not suffice. I feed all of my horses 2 tablespoons of sea salt per day (I buy it in bulk) This website explains potassium imbalance and it's effects very well.

http://www.calmhealthyhorses.com/

My WB

Tim_zps1f92131b.jpeg
 
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cptrayes

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I was also feeding turmeric in the vague hope it would help, but I am almost certain it caused an ulcer and peritonitis (and was extremely ill) which is what I was giving her antibiotics for. I nolonger supplement her turmeric.

I was just about to research turmeric, but this horse is very prior to ulcers, so thanks for that info.
 

YasandCrystal

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I said I don't use a salt lick. I feed her salt.

I know you did I was just using your reply to state how interesting the whole topic of salt and minerals is. The OP uses a lick, hence my statement that this does not suffice.:) I have recommended feeding salt to many people with itchy horses, spooky horses with great results.
 

Clava

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I know you did I was just using your reply to state how interesting the whole topic of salt and minerals is. The OP uses a lick, hence my statement that this does not suffice.:) I have recommended feeding salt to many people with itchy horses, spooky horses with great results.

Oh right :) yes I totally agree, salt licks just don't do it.

I find it sad that I know of a few headshakers and the owners all say that it is "hayfever" and are not prepared to try just removing from grass (although Belle is fine on anything not too rich) and feeding salt, it is a simple option worth trying and it has stopped my mare from headshaking which at one point I thought might require her to be pts.
 

cptrayes

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I know you did I was just using your reply to state how interesting the whole topic of salt and minerals is. The OP uses a lick, hence my statement that this does not suffice.:) I have recommended feeding salt to many people with itchy horses, spooky horses with great results.

Just started a rock salt lick and not heard before of a link between head shaking and salt, but I find it very interesting how much he is attacking the lick. I will add salt to his feed, and stop feeding alfalfa, but his problems started with physical injuries, so I am not expecting any miracles.
 
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cptrayes

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Thanks for the photos people. It's pretty clear so far that his veins are abnormal even for a very TB horse; just another indicator of how much trouble he's in to add to the list :(
 

Clava

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Just started a rock salt lick and not heard before of a link between head shaking and salt, but I find it very interesting how much he is attacking the lick. I will add salt to his feed, and stop feeding alfalfa, but his problems started with physical injuries, so I am not expecting any miracles.

There are many links to salt and headshaking on the phoenix forum I think. I've read quite a few discussions and articles on it in my search for an answer, I should have made a list of them all.

Here is one thread which I also talked about Belle on http://ihdg.proboards.com/thread/126659
 
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