The SNP and Mrs Nicola Sturgeon

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Sherwood Forest.
Anti-fracking campaigners protest against the plan by Ineos to do seismic surveys in public forests across Nottinghamshire, including Sherwood Forest. Photograph: Ian Francis/Alamy

The application by Ineos to explore for shale gas in South Yorkshire has been rejected by local councillors, bringing the number of planning decisions that have gone against fracking companies this year to seven.

Rotherham metropolitan borough turned the application by the UK-based petrochemicals firm to drill a well near the village of Woodsetts on grounds that it could harm wildlife and cause traffic problems.

Ineos had argued that the work would be small scale, have no significant impact and was on agricultural land with little ecological value.

However, the council’s planning board voted unanimously against the application, following a meeting on Thursday.

The rejection is the seventh this year by councils across the Midlands and the north of England against fracking companies’ applications to test existing wells, drill new ones and revise traffic plans, according to Drill or Drop, a site which monitors the shale industry.

While some of the councils are controlled by Labour, which has a national policy of banning fracking, several are controlled by the Conservatives, who promised to develop a shale industry in last year’s manifesto.

The only green light has been for Cuadrilla, to test for oil flows at an existing well near the village of Balcombe, in West Sussex.


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The planning delays are another headache on top of new financial tests that ministers have imposed on companies seeking government permission to frack, which were blamed on Wednesday for Third Energy postponing fracking to the autumn at a site in North Yorkshire.

The shale industry said it now took on average 58 weeks to get a planning decision on the drilling of a vertical well for exploration, up from 13 weeks five years ago.

Ineos is attempting to use fast-track powers created by the government in 2015 to get a decision on two separate shale drilling applications, one in Derbyshire and one near Rotherham. However, that process is still expected to take months.


Police in body armour assist a tanker heading for a test drill site operated by the British energy firm Cuadrilla, in Balcombe, Sussex. Photograph: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

Jim Ratcliffe, the billionaire owner of Ineos, has been a vocal advocate for extracting shale gas in the UK. Woodsetts is one of a handful of sites Ineos had hoped to drill.

Rotherham’s planning officials had recommended against the application on the basis that insufficient ecological surveys had been carried out, to protect birds and bats.

Fracking opponents told councillors they were concerned about noise, water and air pollution, as well as traffic problems created by HGVs.

Sue Gilversleve, a resident in the village and member of the group Woodsetts Against Fracking, said: “We know it sounds a bit like a disaster movie, but this disaster movie is coming to a village near you.”

Andy Tickell, of the regional branch for the Campaign to Protect Rural England, said: “Simply put, this is industrialisation of sensitive and attractive countryside.”


Fracking – the reality, the risks and what the future holds


Read more

During the sometimes heated meeting, the operations director of Ineos, Tom Pickering, had his microphone switched off by the chair, councillor Alan Atkin, for continuing to talk after being asked to stop. “I am not having anyone ridden roughshod over this planning board,” Atkin told Pickering. “Ineos has not covered itself in glory,” he added.

One councillor who attacked Ineos’s behaviour also retracted his comments, after being told by Atkin to apologise for the remarks.

Friends of the Earth said the rejection, the second by Rotherham within months, was deeply significant.

Ineos said it was disappointed by the decision. “We feel that the plans presented offer the right amount of ecological mitigation as part of what is a straightforward application. The fact that a majority of external statutory consultees agree that this is the case, exemplifies this point,” it said in a statement
 

ycbm

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Why don't you start a new thread for a new subject JM? No-one's going to find this here unless they follow your posts.
 
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A fracking thread in Current Affairs or Clubhouse.
I did initially consider an alternative venue, however there is a subtle point to this thread and my sources have indicated, that it has been picked up by the SNP.

Ms Sturgeon has taken on board one's displeasure and aggrieved position, concerning her's and the SNP's failure, to honour their undertaking, not to interfere with any vote in the House of Commons concerning the Hunting Act 2004.

Thereby supporting the matter of English votes for English laws.

Moreover it has been taken on board that this thread has generated over 110 thousand views.

Clearly Ms Sturgeon and the SNP now realise, that 'we' can be helpful in supporting their opposition to Fracking.

So on a quid pro quo basis, it is now in the SNP's interests to help any amendment in the House of Commons to the Hunting Act 2004. Whether that would be via abstaining under the proposed Statutory Instrument or indeed, voting in favor of any proposal remains to be seen.

Nevertheless, the SNP are grateful for our support and it is given with complete munificence.
 
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It seems folk are at last waking up to the issues of Fracking but too little too late.


CLA condemns fracking company’s approach to land access


Philip Clarke

Thursday 29 March 2018 6:00


Tim Breitmeyer, CLA President

The Country Land and Business Association (CLA) has written to leading fracking company Ineos, complaining about its recent approaches to farmers and landowners in relation to accessing land for seismic surveys and future shale gas extraction.

The letter, from CLA president Tim Breitmeyer (pictured), has been triggered by Ineos’s decision to seek High Court action against the National Trust over its refusal to grant access to one of its large estates in Nottinghamshire.

See also: Fracking firm to challenge National Trust in High Court

But a spokesman said the letter also reflected the CLA’s more general concern about Ineos’s recent behaviour, including its requests for farmers and landowners to grant access to their land to carry out seismic testing.

“Until recently, our members have been sympathetic to Ineos’s approach,” said Mr Breitmeyer in his letter. “A number of the larger estates with which you have been working report that they were able to negotiate mutually acceptable arrangements.

“However, the recent decision to take the National Trust to court, to force them to grant access for seismic surveys, and your comments that if there was sufficient gas Ineos could go back to court to force the Trust to allow it access to drill and extract it, completely undermines the positive approach you have taken to date.”

While insisting that the CLA takes no position for or against fracking, Mr Bretimeyer says the organisation is “clear in our defence of a landowner’s right to decide what activities take place on their land”.

He called on Ineos to retract the statement, or risk damaging relations with landowners.

Obligations

But Ineos insists it is pursuing the National Trust in the courts only to help it meet its obligation to complete its seismic surveys, which is part of its commitment to government.

“It is certainly the case that landowners have the right to say ‘no’ to seismic testing; and we do not need 100% access in the survey area, so we can certainly handle some objections,” said Ineos’s commercial director, Lynn Calder.

“But we can’t fulfil our obligation to government if whole organisations or groups of landowners say no.

“So we are able to challenge the National Trust using the Mines Act 1966, though we have to prove that we are being unreasonably impeded from fulfilling our duty. We certainly do not envisage taking every single landowner down that route if they say no to seismic testing.”

Meanwhile, Ineos has challenged a Scottish government ban on fracking, taking it to judicial review with the results expected in May.


The three stages of fracking
•Preparatory stage – involving seismic testing to see if the site looks promising
•Appraisal stage – including construction of a well pad, then hydraulic fracturing to assess gas flow rates
•Production stage – full extraction and gas processing established
 
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You are seriously delusional. Can you pass me some of whatever you're taking :D
In order to expand upon the question of Fracking, the SNP and the Scottish government, who plainly are wholly opposed to Fracking anywhere in Scotland and rightly so.

For the wishes of the Scottish government to be sustained, it has to be seen that Fracking is banned throughout the United Kingdom.

Currently it is permitted under licence in certain parts of England and Wales.

If the SNP were to shall we say, 'leap into bed' with the Conservatives, as have the DUP on the understanding there will be English Votes for English laws for example.

Also that the Conservatives will support the Scottish ban on fracking by mirroring the ban in England and Wales, along with a variety of other measures.

Bearing in mind the moves in Scotland concerning hunting and remembering that the Hunting Act 2004 does not apply to Northern Ireland.

Need one say more........well yes without the DUP Mrs May would not be in office and as I pointed out hunting the live quarry in Northern Ireland is perfectly legal. A fact not many folk realise.

I am told the league never venture to Northern Ireland and interfere will hunting. I wonder why that could be?

That however is a satellite issue.

No the real meat of the issue is the Fracking and it would not surprise me if a deal developed whereby the UK government supported a wholesale ban on Fracking and one or two other items on the shopping list, in return for an undertaking for the SNP to agree to English votes for English laws.

Especially as the issue of BREXIT is somewhat shaky in the House of Commons and what the government might concede to Mrs Sturgeon.
 
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In order to expand upon the question of Fracking, the SNP and the Scottish government, who plainly are wholly opposed to Fracking anywhere in Scotland and rightly so.

For the wishes of the Scottish government to be sustained, it has to be seen that Fracking is banned throughout the United Kingdom.

Currently it is permitted under licence in certain parts of England and Wales.

If the SNP were to shall we say, 'leap into bed' with the Conservatives, as have the DUP on the understanding there will be English Votes for English laws for example.

Also that the Conservatives will support the Scottish ban on fracking by mirroring the ban in England and Wales, along with a variety of other measures.

Bearing in mind the moves in Scotland concerning hunting and remembering that the Hunting Act 2004 does not apply to Northern Ireland.

Need one say more........well yes without the DUP Mrs May would not be in office and as I pointed out hunting the live quarry in Northern Ireland is perfectly legal. A fact not many folk realise.

I am told the league never venture to Northern Ireland and interfere will hunting. I wonder why that could be?

That however is a satellite issue.

No the real meat of the issue is the Fracking and it would not surprise me if a deal developed whereby the UK government supported a wholesale ban on Fracking and one or two other items on the shopping list, in return for an undertaking for the SNP to agree to English votes for English laws.

Especially as the issue of BREXIT is somewhat shaky in the House of Commons and what the government might concede to Mrs Sturgeon.
Coupled to all this, is the matter of the border betwixt the Republic and the north, which Charlie Fox has a habit of crossing without a passport. Along with the hounds, field and masters etc. on every hunting day throughout the season. Again a fact and subject that does not get readily aired in Brussels or Westminster. There is no way the DUP will alter the status quo, which generally and in the highest of diplomatic terms is laughably discussed in terms of milk tankers collecting milk in the north for the creameries in the republic.
 
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Coupled to all this, is the matter of the border betwixt the Republic and the north, which Charlie Fox has a habit of crossing without a passport. Along with the hounds, field and masters etc. on every hunting day throughout the season. Again a fact and subject that does not get readily aired in Brussels or Westminster. There is no way the DUP will alter the status quo, which generally and in the highest of diplomatic terms is laughably discussed in terms of milk tankers collecting milk in the north for the creameries in the republic.
39 packs of hounds in Northern Ireland that hunt the live quarry. Where the Hunting Act 2004 does not apply.
 
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Well would you believe it, the irrepressible Nicola Surgeon has reappeared. I had quite forgotten about Ms Sturgeon.

Suppose she had to gain some attention, but has only succeeded by saying everybody is mad who supports BREXIT.

Thing is we have a saying down yer in the West Country, "everybody about these parts has gone Bodmin, except thee and me, and I sometimes wonder about thee".

https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/9...on-Boris-Johnson-Jacob-Rees-Mogg-Michael-Gove

Nicola Sturgeon brands Johnson, Rees-Mogg and Gove 'MAD-Brexiteers' in SHOCKING interview

NICOLA STURGEON took a massive swipe at leading Brexit supporters Boris Johnson, Jacob Rees-Mogg and Michael Gove during an interview in Brussels, branding them 'mad-Brexiteers'.

By Darren Hunt

PUBLISHED: 12:00, Mon, May 28, 2018 | UPDATED: 18:15, Mon, May 28, 2018

Sturgeon lashes out at Brexiteers for 'peddling myths'

Nicola Sturgeon, who has threatened to reignite her relentless push for Scottish independence, criticised Brexiteers Boris Johnson, Michael Gove and Jacob Rees-Mogg.

The Scottish First Minister headed to Brussels on Monday to meet with the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier.

During an interview with Politico, Ms Sturgeon took the swipe at the leading Brexiteers.

She said: “What I am about to say is not necessarily the statement of opinion or how I might like the world to be, it is just a statement of fact.

“The EU has been pretty clear from day one. There can’t be a ‘pick n mix’ approach, after Brexit the UK is a third country, and it will be dealt with and certain things will follow.

Nicola Sturgeon, Mr Rees-Mogg, Mr Johnson, Mr Gove

Brexit news: Nicola Sturgeon called Mr Rees-Mogg, Mr Johnson and Mr Gove mad-Brexiteers


“You can’t be in the club and ignore all of the founding rules of the club.

“I don’t think there has ever been a point from the EU’s side where that has not been made clear.

“But there has been, on the part of some people, the hard Brexiteers, a sort of willful refusal to accept that because they think they can still peddle all the myths they peddled during the referendum campaign."

She added: “It goes back to the point, two years ago you could possibly be a fantasist and have the moment of truth appearing to be quite far down the road.

“The moment of truth is now staring people in the face and sooner rather than later that moment of truth has to force a choice on the UK Government.”

Ms Sturgeon also claimed Westminster was not listening to a range of opinions on Brexit when she targeted Mr Johnson, Mr Gove and Mr Rees-Mogg.

“One of the problems for the UK Government right now, in my view, is that they are not really listening to anybody apart from the mad-Brexiteers,” she said.

“For the avoidance of doubt I am talking about people like Boris Johnson, just in case people thought I wasn’t naming names. Jacob Rees-Mogg, Michael Gove, I think we know who we are talking about here.

Rees-Mogg: May should use 'strongest card' in Brexit talks

One of the problems for the UK Government right now, in my view, is that they are not really listening to anybody apart from the mad-Brexiteers

Nicola Sturgeon

“That’s the problem, even though I don’t think these people speak for a majority in there of their support for a hard-Brexit, they are the ones who are being listened too.”

The Scottish First Minister also claimed the UK was entering a “critical stage” in the next few weeks in Brexit negotiations.

She said: “To cut to the chase, reality at some point has to bite for the UK.

“Currently the Government is trying to reconcile a whole plethora of irreconcilable issues. At some point, it has to choose.

“At the point, it has to choose, I think there is a prospect that choice, because of the dynamic in the House of Commons and the country more generally that choice takes us in the direction of the customs union and single market.”

Nicola Sturgeon's most outrageous quotes
Sun, April 9, 2017
The nationalist chief always has plenty to say

'Men - the colour of their tie is the most difficult decision they have to make every day'


'Men - the colour of their tie is the most difficult decision they have to make every day'

Ms Sturgeon’s visit to Brussels comes just days after she launched her economic blueprint for Scottish independence, although voters are still in the dark over the timing of any second referendum.

Ms Sturgeon said: “People and businesses are desperate for clarity on Brexit but with just months to go before the withdrawal agreement has to be signed the UK Government still cannot agree a position.

“This damaging uncertainty could come to an immediate end if only the UK Government would put jobs and living standards first and agree to continuing Single Market and Customs Union membership – for Scotland and the whole of the UK.”

Perhaps Ms Sturgeon needs to go to Bodmin
 
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