Dog bit me - my fault - then I kicked it - need (much) better strategy

BBP

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I don’t always like what you write or how you say things, but you’re obviously really upset right now, I’m guessing about Ace? I hope he’s ok and that you can find the funds to help him. I’m just posting to offer you a virtual hug as my gut tells me you need one. And the same to the original poster who clearly knows they did absolutely the wrong thing and feels horrible about it.
 
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jenniehodges2001

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Dogs move on really quickly, try to do the same.
What is is Caesar says? 'Dogs live in the moment'. It will be forgotten about ten mins later, don't beat yourself up. Blimey I've smacked/directed my dog with my toe (not kicked as such) and I smack my horse and they have both lived to tell the tale.
 

Sandstone1

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Dogs do not forget bad treatment sadly. Someone who lashes out at a animal should not really have one. we all have bad days but you shouldnt take it out on a animal. Get some help with training or rehome the dog.
Do not listen to Caeser Milan. The mans a idiot.
 

honetpot

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I know you say that the dogs share happily but I would want separate bowls. What if you need to mix medication with food for one of them? And I would be wary of causing a resource guarding issue, if one of them is a bit unsettled for some reason. It really isn't hard to put 2 bowls down at the same time and is another opportunity to emphasise that your word is law. Ours are taught to finish their meal then sit and wait until they have all finished when they can lick up one another's crumbs if they so desire.
I feed separately, and make the more controllable dog dominate, by feeding it first, then the other has to wait.
 

Cortez

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How is Dog's demeanour after "the incident"? As you are obviously not routinely kicking your dogs around the place I would not worry too much that you are now likely to resort to daily beatings to get your point across. I didn't realise that we were now all supposed to not be using the old fashioned corporal route any more; I haven't had to smack a dog for years but wouldn't hesitate to do so if the situation warranted it, same as with a horse.
 

Sandstone1

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How is Dog's demeanour after "the incident"? As you are obviously not routinely kicking your dogs around the place I would not worry too much that you are now likely to resort to daily beatings to get your point across. I didn't realise that we were now all supposed to not be using the old fashioned corporal route any more; I haven't had to smack a dog for years but wouldn't hesitate to do so if the situation warranted it, same as with a horse.
Its sad that people still resort to violence.
 

Bellasophia

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Hang on...I. agreed with each and every paragraph of the posters laborious three years with this dog and her attempts to remedy the problems..
Poster has worked extremely hard and followed every protocol that she could to get results...
UNTIL,, she stepped in and took a huge bone off an ex rescue dog..and got bitten..and then she kicked it...failures on each side..but, perfectly understandable....and so you move on..no bones ,or prize toys left on the floor. next time use a broom stick to remove bone..
.......what I don’t think is fair is to use Board pack mentality to swoop on Levrier to nip at her heels for her comments and refer back to her own previous experiences with her own dogs.( But totally unrelated posts to this scenario)
This smacks of bullying.( edit..did I really say smacks. Lol)
.We all have an opinion.I-love posting here for the freedom of expression I believe it gives ..I don’t believe in old grudges ,I do believe in open discussion, not sniping.
 
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Sandstone1

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Does a swift tap on the nose (or bum) really count as "violence"? Do you believe the same re horses? Beating the holy crap out of any animal isn't ever going to be advocated by anyone who knows how to train.
If you know how to train you should not need violence. It depends what you mean by a "tap" Yes I do believe the same with horse as a rule.
 

Cortez

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If you know how to train you should not need violence. It depends what you mean by a "tap" Yes I do believe the same with horse as a rule.
By "tap" I mean a tap. Same thing with horses, it's not to cause pain - it's to get attention and focus. Sometimes it's to correct an unwanted action. If I got bitten while attempting to take food or a bone from a dog I would also place the blame at my own door, but I would still reprimand the dog for doing it, and quite firmly too.
 

Sandstone1

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By "tap" I mean a tap. Same thing with horses, it's not to cause pain - it's to get attention and focus. Sometimes it's to correct an unwanted action. If I got bitten while attempting to take food or a bone from a dog I would also place the blame at my own door, but I would still reprimand the dog for doing it, and quite firmly too.
So you would punish the dog for your mistake?
 

skinnydipper

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By "tap" I mean a tap. Same thing with horses, it's not to cause pain - it's to get attention and focus. Sometimes it's to correct an unwanted action. If I got bitten while attempting to take food or a bone from a dog I would also place the blame at my own door, but I would still reprimand the dog for doing it, and quite firmly too.
The poster I disagreed with said she "smacked" her dog. Not something I have ever done, tbh.
 

Pearlsasinger

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I feed separately, and make the more controllable dog dominate, by feeding it first, then the other has to wait.


Ours know the order in which they get their bowls, Rotter first, then Labs at the same time. They all have separate bowls but eat near to each other. If there is a problem for some reason and the Lab bowls can't be put down at the same time, they know to wait because they trust that no other dog will be allowed to eat their food from the wrong dish.

It would never occur to me to have weaned dogs sharing bowls. The dogs need to know that humans are in charge of the food. We regularly feed 'extra' dogs and have never had any problems doing so because they have all been trained to eat from their own bowl in a mannerly way. We have had up to 9 dogs all eating out of separate bowls and behaving themselves in our kitchen.
 

Bellasophia

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Let’s read again...
Poster says...
“Queue Dog dropping bone, biting hand and then picking bone back up again. In between the biting and the picking up again I kicked the dog. Not hard (which, whilst I don't want to do it, might have possibly been effective). So, worst of both worlds. Skin was broken and hand hurt like h*ll. So, there was also an (involuntary) 'oww' as well as a fierce 'no'.”


sounds like the poster came off worse than the dog,has reflected that this isn’t the way to go.....
...this isn’t a case of violence towards an animal,but a gut reaction to being bitten.On reflection The poster realizes she’s left a bone on the floor that became a guarding resource for her rescue dog that reacted instinctively to guard the bone..
The way forward is probably to do training with teach. ...drop and leave ....then reward..etc..
 

skinnydipper

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I had between 8 and 9 dogs for many years. They were all trained to wait at their "spot" and to stay at that spot until all dogs had finished eating before checking out each others bowl. This enabled all the dogs to relax and eat their food without being worried about someone (greedy lurcher Layla) eating it for them.

The original poster made an impulsive mistake when she tried to take a highly valued prize from the dog, I am sure she won't do it again. She also knows that kicking the dog was wrong and was asking for help.
 
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Tiddlypom

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sounds like the poster came off worse than the dog,has reflected that this isn’t the way to go.....
Yup, an instinctive but understandable reaction which the OP regrets. She has been brave enough to post a thread asking for advice on how to move forwards from this set back.

Some posters seem to think that she is now unfit to own any dog :rolleyes:.
 

Sandstone1

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Anyone can make a mistake or react on the spur of the moment but hitting or kicking a dog is not going to teach it anything except to be afraid of you. Dogs do not bite out of the blue or for no reason. They give lots of warnings but we often just do not read their body language.
 

jenniehodges2001

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Yup, an instinctive but understandable reaction which the OP regrets. She has been brave enough to post a thread asking for advice on how to move forwards from this set back.

Some posters seem to think that she is now unfit to own any dog :rolleyes:.
And some posters would argue that the sky is purple with pink spots just for a rise.
She made a mistake, was brave/stupid enough to come on here and get slaughtered. Time to move on and help the poor OP instead of everyone slagging her off for the so called injustice she showered on her dog. We all make mistakes, none of us are saints although evidently there are many on here that feel they should wear a halo.
 

skinnydipper

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Good of the OP to put that in the title of the thread so there is no confusion.
I was referring to the post by jenniehodges who said she smacks her dog and horse.

This is what I wrote about the the OP

The original poster made an impulsive mistake when she tried to take a highly valued prize from the dog, I am sure she won't do it again. She also knows that kicking the dog was wrong and was asking for help.
 
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skinnydipper

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I also occasionally smack my dogs and horses, rarely, but as required: does that make me a bad trainer?
I am an amateur, not a professional. (I only have experience of training my own dogs)

If a dog is not doing as I ask then I feel it is a failure on my part because I have not helped them to understand what it is that I am asking them to do.
 
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